1 FAM 440

BUREAU OF ARMS CONTROL, VERIFICATION AND COMPLIANCE (AVC)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)
(Office of Origin:  AVC)

1 FAM 441  ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ARMS CONTROL, VERIFICATION AND COMPLIANCE (AVC)

1 FAM 441.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC):

(1)  Reports directly to the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security (T);

(2)  Has as his or her principal responsibility the overall supervision (including oversight of policy and resources) within the Department of all matters relating to verification and compliance with international arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements or commitments;

(3)  Leads U.S. efforts to develop arms control policies for the implementation of existing agreements and the negotiation of future agreements;

(4)  Leads efforts to promote the vision of a safe, secure world through the development, negotiation and implementation of bilateral and multilateral arms control and disarmament, transparency and confidence-building measures;

(5)  Advances national and international security through the negotiation and implementation of effectively verifiable and diligently enforced arms control and disarmament agreements involving weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery as well as some categories of conventional weapons;

(6)  Leads efforts for developing U.S. policy relative to existing and prospective Euro-Atlantic arms control, disarmament, and security arrangements concerning conventional and nuclear weapons and forces;

(7)  Advances missile defense and space policy in support of U.S. national security policies and objectives;

(8)  Leads efforts to develop new verification and transparency technologies in support of arms control agreements and arrangements;

(9)  Leads efforts to enhance strategic stability;

(10) Coordinates policy recommendations within the U.S. Government regarding verification of compliance with international arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments, and assists the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security in developing verification and compliance policies and negotiating and implementing verifiable agreements or commitments;

(11) Supervises three deputy assistant secretaries, who, in turn, manage the day-to-day operations of their portion of AVC, exercising principal oversight over the management and staffing of the subordinate organizations and the development of policies and programs to assure responsiveness to Administration and Departmental priorities:

(a)  Designates one of the three deputy assistant secretaries as his or her principal deputy assistant secretary (PDAS); and

(b)  The PDAS supports the Assistant Secretary’s management of the bureau and serves as Acting Assistant Secretary in the absence of the Assistant Secretary, performing all functions of that position that have been properly delegated;

(12) Serves as the principal policy representative to the Intelligence Community on verification and compliance matters (22 U.S.C. 2652c(c)(3)).  In this regard, the Assistant Secretary articulates requirements for intelligence assets and sensor programs critical to verifying compliance with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments, and supports efforts to ensure that such programs and technologies are developed, deployed, maintained, and adequately funded;

(13) Participates in all Departmental and interagency groups or organizations within the executive branch that assess, analyze, or review U.S. planned or ongoing policies, programs, or actions that have a direct bearing on verification and compliance.  These include intelligence committees concerned with developing or exploiting measurement or signals intelligence or other national technical means of verification (22 U.S.C. 2652c(c)(2));

(14) Leads the Department’s development of verification proposals and assessments for prospective arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments; and negotiates verification measures and leads related consultations.  On behalf of the Secretary, the Assistant Secretary prepares verifiability assessments for submission to Congress on the degree to which the components of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements can be verified, as required under 22 U.S.C. 2577 or by direction;

(15) Leads the Department’s assessment of the compliance of other countries with their arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments; leads compliance diplomacy efforts; and engages in diplomatic consultations to address compliance policy and concerns.  The Assistant Secretary is responsible for verifying of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)-related bilateral and multilateral agreements and commitments;

(16) Prepares the President’s Annual Report to Congress on “Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments” (22 U.S.C. 2593a), other congressional reports on compliance, and other reports prepared by the Department relating to arms control, nonproliferation, or disarmament verification or compliance matters;

(17) Prepares the President’s Annual Report on compliance with the Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Flank Document consistent with Condition 5(C) of the Senate CFE Resolution of Advice and Consent to Ratification;

(18) Prepares the President’s Annual Report on compliance with the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) consistent with Condition 10(C) of the Senate CWC Senate Resolution of Advice and Consent to Ratification;

(19) Prepares the President’s Annual Report on the New START Treaty (NST) consistent with Condition 10, and the President’s Annual Report on Nonstrategic (Tactical) Nuclear Weapons consistent with Condition 12(B) of the Senate Resolution of Advice and Consent to Ratification of the New START Treaty, dated December 22, 2010;

(20) Evaluates and executes, from the perspective of verification and compliance, the implementation of existing and future arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments and related transparency measures;

(21) Leads the Department in all matters related to the implementation of existing and prospective international arms control and disarmament agreements and commitments related to strategic and intermediate-range missiles and conventional weapons issues.  Agreements include:  the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START); Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty; the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT); the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT); Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling, and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction (CWC); Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE); Vienna Document 2011 Confidence-and Security-Building Measures (CSBMs); Treaty on Open Skies; and arms control elements of the Dayton Peace Accords;

(22) Leads efforts to promote the global ban on chemical weapons embodied in the CWC and manages the U.S. National Authority that oversees U.S. implementation of the CWC;

(23) Serves as the Department’s lead and principal policy representative to the U.S.-European Union’s (EU) regular dialogues on verification, compliance and related issues—meeting at (27+1)—in a continued effort to strengthen our strategic partnership with the EU and work together on issues of common interest in the areas of Euro-Atlantic security, arms control implementation, verification, compliance, space and compliance enforcement;

(24) Leads efforts to promote U.S. arms control and disarmament objectives in UN and UN-related venues, to include the UN First Committee (Nonproliferation and Disarmament), the Conference on Disarmament, and the UN Disarmament Commission;

(25) Ensures that verification, compliance, and compliance enforcement implications are factored into the development of U.S. policies to strengthen existing and develop new arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and arrangements (related to nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons and missiles and other delivery systems);

(26) Develops and reviews the verification and compliance performance of countries being considered for membership in multilateral nonproliferation agreements and arrangements, including the Australia Group and the Missile Technology Control Regime; and oversees bureau participation in Department efforts related to these treaty organizations and other multilateral and regional organizations;

(27) Manages the “Key Verification Assets Fund” (Section 1111 of Public Law 106-113).  The “V Fund,” established by Congress, authorizes the Secretary to transfer funds to other agencies for retaining, researching, developing, or acquiring technologies or programs relating to the verification of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments.  As the coordinating entity for the U.S. Government, the bureau ensures that the V Fund supports projects facilitating achievement of Administration priorities and leverages the use of Department funds to assist other agencies in the development of technologies and programs critical for detecting WMD activities and for verifying compliance;

(28) Manages the External Research Board (REB) on behalf of the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security;

(29) Serves as the Director of the Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (NRRC), which operates dedicated government-to-government communications systems on a 24-hour basis, and is charged with transmitting and disseminating, for the U.S. Government, government-to-government notifications required under various arms control and security agreements.  The Assistant Secretary leads negotiations related to existing and prospective arms control and other security agreements involving this center;

(30) Maintains on behalf of the Department of State, which is the designated U.S. Government archivist, a comprehensive diplomatic record of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament negotiations, as well as a comprehensive database on verification and compliance information (22 U.S.C. 2578 and 22 U.S.C. 2577a);

(31) Manages the Department’s Foster Fellows program, which brings visiting scholars from the faculties of recognized institutes of higher learning to work in the Department in the fields of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament (22 U.S.C. 2568); and

(32) Analyzes military expenditures and arms transfers and prepares a comprehensive unclassified annual report on “World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers,” pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2593b.

1 FAM 441.2  Organization

(CT:ORG-235;   02-14-2011)

An organization chart of the Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC) is found at 1 FAM Exhibit 441.2.

1 FAM 441.3  Definitions

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

Bilateral Consultative Commission (BCC):  The Bilateral Consultative Commission was created to promote the objectives and implementation of the provisions of the New START Treaty.

Biological Weapons Convention (BWC):  The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction entered into force March 26, 1975.  The BWC was the first multilateral disarmament treaty banning an entire category of weapons.  It effectively prohibits the development, production, acquisition, transfer, retention, stockpiling, and use of biological and toxin weapons.  The treaty currently has 155 state parties and 16 signatory parties.

Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC):  The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling, and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction entered into force April 29, 1997.  The CWC obligates states’ parties to never under any circumstances develop, produce, or otherwise acquire, stockpile, or retain chemical weapons, or transfer, directly or indirectly, chemical weapons to anyone.  The Treaty currently has 188 member states.

Chemical weapons (CW):

(1)  Toxic chemicals and their precursors, except where intended for purposes not prohibited under the Chemical Weapons Convention, as long as the types and quantities are consistent with such purposes;

(2)  Munitions and devices, specifically designed to cause death or other harm through the toxic properties of those toxic chemicals specified in subparagraph (1) of this definition, which would be released as a result of employing such munitions or devices; and

(3)  Any equipment specifically designed to be used directly in connection with the employment of the munitions and devices specified in subparagraph (2) of this definition.

Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT):  The CTBT bans nuclear test explosions in any environment and, in so doing, aims at eliminating nuclear weapons by constraining the development and qualitative improvement of new types of nuclear weapons.  It was drafted at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva and opened for signature in New York on September 24, 1996.  The CTBT will enter into force 180 days after it has been ratified by the 44 states listed in Annex 2 of the Treaty.  The Treaty provides for a comprehensive global verification regime, which consists of an International Monitoring System, consultation and clarification procedures, provisions for requesting on-site inspections, and confidence-building measures.

Confidence-and-security-building measures (CSBMs):  Measures requiring effective and concrete actions concerning the military activities and force structures of the states concerned and aimed at reducing tension and strengthening confidence and security among those states.  For example, the Vienna Document 2011 contains CSBMs developed by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).

Conventional Armed Forces in Europe Treaty (CFE):  A 30-nation international treaty that establishes limitations on conventional armaments and equipment and provides for transparency about the conventional armed forces of the states’ parties.  The Treaty entered into force in July 1992 and its limitations took effect in November 1995.

Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT):  This proposed international treaty would ban the further production of fissile material for use in nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices.  Major related issues include dealing with existing national stocks of fissile material, the identification of effective measures for the verification of treaty compliance, requirements for treaty entry into force, and treaty duration.

Forum for Security Cooperation (FSC):  The body of the Vienna-based Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) that negotiates and reviews implementation of agreements related to arms control, disarmament, and confidence-and-security-building measures, as well as other military and security issues.

Foster Fellowship Program:  The program that brings noted academics to the State Department for 1-year assignments.  Section 202 of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act, as amended (22 U.S.C. 2568), provides that "[a] program for visiting scholars in the fields of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament shall be established in order to obtain the services of scholars from the faculties of recognized institutes of higher learning."  The law states that the purpose of the program is to give specialists in the physical sciences and other disciplines an opportunity for active participation in the arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament activities of the Department of State and to enable the Department to gain the perspective and expertise such persons can offer.  Foster Fellows serve for 1 year in the Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance; the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation; and the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs.  Scholars are named in honor of William C. Foster, the first director of the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, who served from 1961 to 1969.  Over 60 scholars have served since the program began in 1984.

High-Level Task Force (HLTF):  The NATO body responsible for addressing issues related to Euro-Atlantic conventional arms control.

Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty:  The Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles entered into force on June 1, 1988.  The Treaty is of unlimited duration.

Joint Consultative Group (JCG):  The implementing body for the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe.  The JCG meets in Vienna, Austria.

Limited Test-Ban Treaty (LTBT):  The Treaty Banning Nuclear Weapon Tests in the Atmosphere, in Outer Space and Under Water entered into force October 10, 1963.  The treaty prohibits nuclear weapons tests or any other nuclear explosion in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water.  While not banning tests underground, the treaty does prohibit nuclear explosions in this environment if they cause “radioactive debris to be present outside the territorial limits of the state under whose jurisdiction or control” the explosions were conducted.  The treaty is of unlimited duration.

Moscow Treaty:  The treaty was superseded by the New START Treaty upon its entry into force on February 5, 2011.

The national technical means (NTM):  All data available to a nation from all sources and exploitation techniques, whether classified or unclassified, to use in assessing the actions and behavior of other nations.  The term is frequently applied to compliance determinations, but can be used to assess threats emanating from hostile nations.  NTM can include data from sensors/devices on the surface, under the surface, in the air, or in space, as well as data reported by individuals and groups.

Publicly available dataData from international inspectorates (such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons), defector reports, news media, and various sources on the Internet.

New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START):  The Treaty between the United States of America and the Russian Federation on Measures for the Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms.  The treaty was signed on April 8, 2010 in Prague, the Senate provided advice and consent to ratification on December 22, 2010, and the treaty entered into force on February 5, 2011.  The New START Treaty superseded the Moscow Treaty and succeeds the original START Treaty, which expired on December 5, 2009.

Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technology Working Group:  The Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technology Working Group (NPAC TWG) was created by Presidential Decision Directive (PDD-27) in 1994 as the mechanism to coordinate the research and development response to challenges in arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament.  The President has designated the Department of State, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Defense as the co-chairing agencies for the NPAC TWG.  The Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach in the Bureau of Arms Control, Verification and Compliance represents the Department of State in this capacity as co-chair and as the Executive Secretary for the NPAC TWG.

Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT):  The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, also known as the NPT, entered into force on March 5, 1970.  The Treaty is designed to:  prevent the spread of nuclear weapons; provide assurance, through international safeguards, that the peaceful nuclear activities of states which have not already developed nuclear weapons will not be diverted to making such weapons; promote, to the maximum extent consistent with the other purposes of the treaty, the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, to include the potential benefits of any peaceful application of nuclear explosion technology being made available to nonnuclear parties under appropriate international observation; and express the determination of the parties that the treaty should lead to further progress in comprehensive arms control and nuclear disarmament measures.  On May 11, 1995, more than 170 countries attending the NPT Review and Extension Conference decided to extend the treaty indefinitely and without conditions.

Open Skies Consultative Commission (OSCC):  The implementing body for the Treaty on Open Skies.  The OSCC meets in Vienna, Austria.

Open Skies Treaty:  A 34-nation international treaty that establishes a regime of unarmed aerial observation flights over the entire territories of the states’ parties in order to gather information about military forces and activities as a means of promoting openness and transparency.  The treaty entered into force on January 1, 2002.

Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE):  The Vienna-based regional security organization composed of 57 participating states from Europe, Central Asia, and North America that deals with and promotes dialogue on military security, early warning, conflict prevention, crisis management, and post-conflict rehabilitation as well as democratization and human rights issues.

Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW):  This implementing body of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) has the mandate to achieve the object and purpose of the Convention to ensure the implementation of its provisions, including those for international verification of compliance with it, and to provide a forum for consultation and cooperation among states’ parties.

Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty (PNET):  The Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on Underground Nuclear Explosions for Peaceful Purposes, also known as the PNET, was signed in on May 28, 1976.  The PNET governs all nuclear explosions carried out at locations outside the weapons test sites specified under the Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT).  The parties agree not to carry out any individual nuclear explosions having a yield exceeding 150 kilotons; not to carry out any group explosion having an aggregate yield exceeding 1,500 kilotons; and not to carry out any group explosion having an aggregate yield exceeding 150 kilotons unless the individual explosions in the group could be identified and measured by agreed verification procedures.  The treaty entered into force December 11, 1990.  The treaty remains in force for a period of 5 years from entry into force and is automatically extended for successive 5-year periods.  However, neither party may withdraw from the PNET while the TTBT remains in force; conversely, either party may withdraw from the PNET upon termination of the TTBT.

Special Verification Commission (SVC):  The forum established by the Treaty between The United States of America and The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles (also known as the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty) to address implementation and compliance issues for that Treaty.

Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START):  The Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms.  The treaty was signed on July 31, 1991, entered into force December 5, 1994, and expired on December 5, 2009.

Threshold Test-Ban Treaty (TTBT):  The Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Limitation of Underground Nuclear Weapon Tests, also known as the TTBT, was signed on July 3, 1974.  It establishes a nuclear “threshold,” by prohibiting tests having a yield exceeding 150 kilotons.  The protocol to the TTBT limits nuclear weapon testing to specific designated tests sites to assist verification.  The United States and the Soviet Union began negotiations in November 1987 to reach agreement on additional verification provisions that would make it possible for the United States to ratify the treaty.  The TTBT verification protocol provides for the use of the hydrodynamic yield measurement method with respect to all tests having a planned yield measurement method with respect to all tests having a planned yield exceeding 50 kilotons, as well as seismic monitoring and, with respect to all tests having a planned yield exceeding 35 kilotons, on-site inspections.  The treaty entered into force December 11, 1990.  The treaty remains in force for a period of 5 years from entry into force and is automatically extended for successive 5-year periods unless either party notifies the other of its termination or the parties achieve a solution to the problem of the cessation of all underground nuclear weapon tests.

1 FAM 441.4  Authorities

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

Authorities include:

(1)  The Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, Public Law 105-277, amended the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (Public Law 87-297), and abolished the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.  Its functions and personnel were incorporated into the Department of State;

(2)  Section 1112 of the Arms Control and Nonproliferation Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-113; 22 U.S.C. 2652c), which established the position and principal functions of the Assistant Secretary of State for Verification and Compliance.  In the Department’s reorganization of the T bureaus in 2005, the bureau’s name was changed to Verification, Compliance, and Implementation (VCI) and additional implementation responsibilities were added to the bureau’s portfolio.  In the Department’s reorganization of the T bureaus in 2010, the bureau’s name was changed to Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC);

(3)  The Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Bureau is responsible within the Department for fulfilling various congressional reporting requirements (22 U.S.C. 2652c(c)(4)).  These include:

(a)  All reports required pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2577, which encompass verifiability assessments in connection with arms control, nonproliferation, or disarmament agreements or proposals; and reports required in the case of any significant degradation in the capacity of the United States to verify compliance of the components of such agreements;

(b)  The President’s Annual Report to Congress entitled “Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments”—referenced as “so much of the report required under paragraphs (4) through (6) of Section 403(a) of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (22 U.S.C. 2593a(a)(4) through (6)) as relates to verification and compliance matters” (also referred to as the Compliance Report (CR));

(c)  Specialized reports on compliance by U.S. treaty partners as required by Senate Resolutions of Advice and Consent to Ratification for the Conventional Armed Forces in Europe Flank Document (Condition 5(C)), the Chemical Weapons Convention (Condition 10); and

(d)  Other reports being prepared by the Department of State as of November 29, 1999, relating to arms control, nonproliferation, or disarmament verification or compliance matters (22 U.S.C. 2652c(c)(4)(C));

(4)  Section 1111 of Public Law 106-113 establishes the ‘Key Verification Assets Fund” (V Fund) and authorizes the Secretary of State “to transfer funds available to the Department of State under this section to the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, or any agency, entity, or component of the Intelligence Community, as needed, for retaining, researching, developing, or acquiring technologies or programs relating to the verification of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements or commitments.”  The Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Bureau has the responsibility in the Department for overseeing the V Fund and advising the Secretary;

(5)  22 U.S.C. 2578 requires the Secretary of State to establish and maintain a comprehensive negotiation record archive for each arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreement under negotiation or in force after January 1, 1990.  At the direction of T, the Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance has the responsibility within the Department for fulfilling this requirement;

(6)  22 U.S.C. 2577a requires the Department to maintain a comprehensive information database on verification concepts, research, technologies, and systems.  At the direction of T, the Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Bureau has the responsibility in the Department for fulfilling this requirement;

(7)  Pursuant to National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 301 (1988) and the 1987 Soviet-American Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (NRRC) Agreement (as revised in 2000), the Department established the NRRC on a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week basis, for the U.S. Government to facilitate government-to-government communications in connection with measures to reduce the risk of nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union (extends to the Parties of the expired START Treaty—the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine).  The role of the NRRC has subsequently been expanded to encompass notifications and exchanges involving a wide range of bilateral and multilateral arms control agreements.  The Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance serves as Director of the NRRC;

(8)  22 U.S.C. 2571 requires the Department to coordinate research, development, and other studies conducted in the fields of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament by or for other government agencies.  At the direction of T, the Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Bureau has the responsibility in the Department for fulfilling this requirement;

(9)  22 U.S.C. 2593b requires the Secretary of State to publish an annual unclassified report on world military expenditures and arms transfers.  At the direction of T, the Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Bureau has the responsibility in the Department for preparing this report;

(10) Executive Order 13128 and NSPD 70 with respect to the implementation of the CWC;

(11) Delegation of Authority 293-2, dated October 23, 2011, Section 2(a)(13), which delegated from the Secretary of State to the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T) all of the functions that were vested in the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) before it was merged, by statute, with the Department of State, including any functions conferred on the Director or any officer or employee of ACDA.  As noted in this subchapter, many of those authorities are now exercised by the Arms Control, Verification and Compliance Bureau, at the direction of T; and

(12) Other authorities, as appropriate.

1 FAM 442  TREATY COMMISSIONERS AND REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING DIRECTLY TO THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY

1 FAM 442.1  U.S. Representative for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (AVC/OPCW)

(CT:ORG-235;   02-14-2011)

The U.S. Representative for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (AVC/OPCW):

(1)  Serves as the U.S. Representative to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW);

(2)  Maintains close confidential relationships with the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security and the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation;

(3)  As the Representative to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, has the lead responsibility for all matters within the Department of State on issues directly involving U.S. participation in the organization;

(4)  In coordination with AVC, develops and implements executive branch policy with respect to the prohibition of chemical weapons and is responsible for developing strategies to implement this policy; and

(5)  In coordination with the bureaus of Legislative Affairs and Public Affairs, serves as a principal spokesperson for the Administration and the Department of State before Congress and the public on all matters directly involving U.S. participation in the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

1 FAM 442.2  U.S. Representative for the Conference on Disarmament (AVC/CD)

(CT:ORG-235;   02-14-2011)

The U.S. Representative for the Conference on Disarmament (AVC/CD):

(1)  Serves as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament (CD);

(2)  Maintains close relationships with the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security and the Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC);

(3)  As the Permanent Representative to the Conference on Disarmament, has the lead responsibility within the Department of State on all matters directly involving U.S. participation in that organization;

(4)  In coordination with AVC, develops executive branch policies with respect to all issues within the purview of the Conference on Disarmament, including strategies for implementing those policies;

(5)  In coordination with AVC, the Bureau of International Organization Affairs, and the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, leads the United States Delegation to the annual meeting of the First (Disarmament and International Security) Committee of the United Nations General Assembly; and

(6)  In coordination with the bureaus of Legislative Affairs and of Public Affairs, serves as a principal spokesperson for the Administration and the Department of State before Congress and the public on all matters directly involving U.S. participation in the Conference on Disarmament.

1 FAM 442.3  U.S. Commissioners, INF Treaty and the New START Treaty

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The U.S. Commissioners, INF Treaty and the New START Treaty:

(1)  Contribute to overall policy direction and coordination for all activities related to the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty’s Special Verification Commission; and the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty’s (New START) Bilateral Consultative Commission.  The commissioners advise the Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security on all matters related to the implementation of the INF, and New START Treaties.  The commissioners also provide general advice on potential follow-on agreements and commitments; further reductions of nuclear weapons; and verification and transparency related to those reductions;

(2)  Head the interagency U.S. delegations to the INF and New START Treaties’ implementation commissions.  Upon request of the National Security Council, the commissioners chair the interagency Policy Committee and, as permitted by the respective treaties, negotiate agreements and formal statements in the Commissions on issues arising from implementation of the INF and New START Treaties.  The commissioners, working with the relevant interagency committee, provide leadership and advice to the interagency discussions and implementation efforts related to the INF and New START treaties;

(3)  Liaise with offices in the State Department, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Intelligence Community, Department of Energy, and National Security Council involved in INF and New START Treaty implementation; and

(4)  Set goals and objectives for U.S. delegations, and monitors and directs the use of delegation staff and other resources to achieve bureau priorities for INF and New START Treaty implementation and compliance assessment.

1 FAM 442.4  Chief U.S. Arms Control Delegate, U.S. Mission to the OSCE

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Chief U.S. Arms Control Delegate, U.S. Mission to the OSCE:

(1)  Performs duties under the direction of the U.S. Representative to the Organization for Security and Cooperation (OSCE) and the Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance;

(2)  Contributes to overall policy development and coordination for all activities related to the Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty’s Joint Consultative Group (JCG); the Open Skies Treaty’s Open Skies Consultative Commission (OSCC); and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s (OSCE) Forum for Security Cooperation (FSC); and for purposes of Articles IV and V of Annex 1B of the Dayton Accords.  This delegate advises the Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance on all matters related to the management of these treaties and agreements in these bodies, and also provides advice on treaty implementation involving verification and compliance issues;

(3)  Heads the interagency U.S. delegation to sessions of the JCG, OSCC, FSC, the Dayton Accords Article V Commission, and overseas delegation activities related to Article IV of Annex 1B of the Dayton Accords.  As instructed by the National Security Council-chaired interagency policy committee on Arms Control, the delegate negotiates agreements and makes formal statements in these bodies on issues arising from implementation of the treaties and agreements.  The delegate has responsibility for liaison with the State Department and representatives from other agencies serving on the U.S. delegation from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other agencies as appropriate;

(4)  Based on guidance, prepares and presents policy, position papers, and statements to the three arms control implementation forums in Vienna.  The delegate is responsible for reporting on all official meetings and other delegation meetings as they relate to implementation issues.  In this capacity, the delegate participates in interagency discussion and implementation efforts related to the CFE and Open Skies Treaties; the Vienna Document 2011 on Confidence and Security-Building Measures (CSBMs); and many other FSC-agreed CSBMs; and

(5)  Sets goals and objectives for the U.S. arms control delegation to the OSCE and monitors and directs the use of staff and other resources in Vienna to achieve bureau priorities for U.S. treaty implementation objectives.

1 FAM 442.5  Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission (AVC/CTBT)

(CT:ORG-235;   02-14-2011)

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission (AVC/CTBT):

(1)  Contributes to interagency development of the overall policy direction and coordination for all activities related to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) Preparatory Commission and advises the Assistant Secretary on all matters related to the CTBT;

(2)  Heads the interagency U.S. delegation to the CTBT Preparatory Commission and its subordinate bodies in sessions with other signatories to the treaty and negotiates agreements and formal statements in the Commission on issues arising from implementing this treaty.  The AVC/CTBT participates in interagency discussions and implementation efforts related to the CTBT;

(3)  Has responsibility for liaison with State Department, OSD, JCS, DOE, and NSC offices involved in the Commission; and

(4)  Sets goals and objectives, and monitors and directs the use of mission unit staff and other resources to achieve bureau priorities for CTBT implementation and compliance.

1 FAM 443  DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARIES

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

a. Three deputy assistant secretaries report to the Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance.

b. The deputy assistant secretaries advise the Assistant Secretary on arms control, verification, and compliance policy formulation, negotiation, implementation, and reporting.

c.  The deputy assistant secretaries also help set bureau goals and objectives, and direct and oversee the use of staff and other resources to pursue and achieve bureau, Department, and U.S. Government priorities.

d. The deputy assistant secretaries assist the Assistant Secretary in the management of the bureau in the development and implementation of U.S. Government arms control, verification, and compliance policy, including with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments.

e. The deputy assistant secretaries monitor other countries’ compliance with their arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments and support the bureau’s preparation of the President’s annual Report on “Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments” (also referred to as the Compliance Report).

f.  As designated by the Assistant Secretary, the deputy assistant secretaries lead international discussions and diplomacy efforts related to arms control, verification, compliance, and compliance enforcement, and implementation of arms control and disarmament agreements and commitments as appropriate.

g. At the direction of the Assistant Secretary, the deputy assistant secretaries ensure that verification and compliance policies are factored into U.S. efforts to strengthen existing and developing new, arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament regimes and arrangements.

h. The deputy assistant secretaries coordinate and/or consult on arms control, verification, and compliance policy with other U.S. Government departments and agencies, and meet with Congress, foreign governments, and international entities to explain and build support for U.S. arms control, verification, and compliance policies.

i.  As required, the deputy assistant secretaries testify before Congressional Committees and brief congressional staff.

j.  The Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary supervises the work of the following offices:

(1)  Office of Multilateral and Nuclear Affairs (AVC/MNA); and

(2)  Office of Strategic Stability and Deterrence Affairs (AVC/SSD).

k. The Deputy Assistant Secretary for Verification, Planning, and European Security (AVC/FO) supervises the work of the following offices:

(1)  Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO);

(2)  Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs (AVC/ESA); and

(3)  Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (AVC/NRRC).

l.  The Deputy Assistant Secretary for Emerging Security Challenges and Defense Policy (AVC/FO) supervises the work of the following offices:

(1)  Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs (AVC/CBW); and

(2)  Office of Emerging Security Challenges (AVC/ESC).

1 FAM 444  OFFICES REPORTING TO THE DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARIES

1 FAM 444.1  Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs (AVC/CBW)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs (AVC/CBW):

(1)  Leads efforts to promote the global ban on chemical weapons embodied in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); manages the U.S. National Authority for the CWC; and assesses compliance with the CWC and the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC).  The office also implements efforts to impede and roll back the threat of chemical and biological weapons and to dissuade and impede states and entities from pursuing, using, and/or proliferating these weapons and related equipment and technology;

(2)  Specifically, the office has lead responsibility within the U.S. Government for bilateral and multilateral efforts to implement the CWC and promotes measures on the future of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).  It provides direct guidance and support to the U.S. Delegation to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and manages the U.S. National Authority, which oversees U.S. implementation of the CWC.  The office chairs the U.S. Government-wide CWC Backstopping Group;

(3)  The office also has lead responsibility within the Department for developing policy and addressing verification and compliance aspects of existing and prospective agreements and commitments involving biological or chemical weapons;

(4)  The office has the lead on U.S. compliance assessments of other countries’ chemical and biological activities, as well as on developing approaches and leading negotiations to resolve U.S. concerns and chairs the U.S. Government-wide Verification, Compliance and Analysis Working Group (VCAWG);

(5)  The office prepares those sections of the congressionally-mandated annual report on Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments relating to chemical and biological weapons;

(6)  In addition, with respect to the CWC, the office prepares the Annual Condition 10(C) Report on compliance with the CWC mandated by the Senate Resolution of Ratification;

(7)  The office is also responsible for preparing verifiability assessments of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements as required under 22 U.S.C. 2577 or by direction;

(8)  Represents the Department on these issues in contacts with the NSC, the Departments of Defense, Commerce, Homeland Security, Justice, the Intelligence Community, and other applicable entities, on issues involving chemical and biological weapons; and

(9)  Coordinates closely with the Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO) to ensure that current and projected collection and analytical requirements related to verification, compliance, and implementation in the above areas are clearly formulated, well understood, and given appropriate emphasis and attention.

1 FAM 444.2  Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Verification, Planning, and European Security;

(2)  Supports AVC bureau principals by providing concrete strategic planning support for all Congressional, public affairs, and public diplomacy activities:

(a)  Coordinates strategies and plans to inform key U.S. groups and opinion leaders on bureau objectives, including overseeing outreach to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs);

(b)  Serves as policy advisor to the Bureau’s Assistant Secretary (AVC) and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (AVC/PDAS) on all legislative, congressional, press, and public affairs relating to all issues within the AVC Bureau’s purview;

(c)  Coordinates with others within the Department of State and with appropriate representatives of other U.S. Government agencies, including the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Energy (DOE), National Security Council (NSC), and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) with respect to the presentation of policy issues before Congress, the media and the public;

(d)  Serves as the bureau’s GAO liaison to the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services (CGFS), ensuring adequate and appropriate representation of AVC equities; facilitating GAO requests for meetings and information; and providing feedback and follow-up to GAO as reports are drafted and released;

(e)  Integrates arms control, disarmament and compliance issues into U.S. foreign policy, and, in coordination with the Bureau of Public Affairs (PA), develops and delivers key messages on these issues to the media, NGOs, the private sector and the Congress;

(f)   Coordinates AVC bureau-wide analyses of cross-cutting issues and works with other offices in the bureau to better align positions in various forums to advance U.S. interests.  AVC/VPO coordinates and works with the Department’s Bureau of Public Affairs;

(g)  Coordinates bureau efforts on strategic dialogues and regional processes involving multiple AVC issues;

(h)  Collaborates with regional and functional bureaus in preparation of policy papers and briefing material for meetings and trips by AVC principals and visits of senior foreign officials;

(i)   Oversees the full range of Congressional activities for the bureau, including activities relating to legislation and preparation of Congressional testimony, hearings and briefings by bureau principals, staff, and other U.S. Government officials on the full range of AVC topics and manages preparation of Congressional correspondence;

(j)   Supervises the submission of reports mandated by Congress;

(k)  Develops and maintains relationships with key Congressional interlocutors and relevant media outlets;

(l)   Reviews and analyzes legislation involving Department and AVC equities and keeps the Assistant Secretary and appropriate bureau staff informed of Congressional activities;

(m) Provides advice and counsel H on AVC issues and works closely with H contacts to coordinate options and strategies and to formulate Department positions on AVC issues;

(n)  Recommends legislative options and strategies to advance AVC goals;

(o)  Oversees and coordinates the preparation of statements and briefing materials for testimony by the Assistant Secretary and other senior Department of State principals on substantive arms control, disarmament and compliance issues, as well as responses to Congressional inquiries in written, spoken, or briefing form;

(p)  Develops, plans, coordinates, and executes a broad range of outreach efforts, both foreign (public diplomacy) and domestic (public affairs), in support of Department and U.S. Government international security and nonproliferation priorities to inform and influence key foreign groups and opinion leaders, NGOs, academia, youth audiences, and the general public;

(q)  Formulates and implements public affairs and public diplomacy for the bureau, including speeches, press guidance, opinion-editorials, and web content;

(r)   Plans and oversees the execution of public affairs initiatives and media and press activities, advising the Assistant Secretary and bureau principals on media contacts and appearances;

(s)  Responds to direct media inquiries, coordinating with PA and serves as the single point of contact for AVC interaction with foreign and domestic press to include coordination and the timely preparation and dissemination of daily press guidance for AVC, working closely with PA and press officers throughout the Department;

(t)   Maintains and facilitates broad clearance of a wide range of current AVC talking points for use by AVC principals and other Department officials; and

(u)  Monitors online media activity and maintains the bureau’s online, electronic information sites;

(3)  Provides policy guidance to senior members of the Department of State and advises the Assistant Secretary and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T) on technology issues and requirements:

(aParticipates in interagency groups that promote and guide the research and development of promising verification and transparency technologies and assets (pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2571);

(b)  Represents the Department at the interagency Counterproliferation Program Review Committee to address improvements in the U.S. Government’s efforts to combat WMD and the means of their delivery;

(c)  Supports the Assistant Secretary’s official role as the Department's principal policy representative to the Intelligence Community and its constituent parts by participating in interagency and Intelligence Community boards, committees, and working groups concerned with developing, retaining, and strengthening national technical means (NTM) necessary for verifying compliance with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments, and with respect to other verification and compliance matters;

(d)  Develops the annual AVC Research and Development Requirements document and ensures widest external distribution for articulating bureau technology requirements for sensor programs and assets critical for verifying compliance with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments and supports efforts to ensure that these programs are developed, deployed, maintained, and adequately funded;

(e)  Assesses the capability of technologies, systems, devices, and techniques to promote verification with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments, as required under 22 U.S.C. 2577 or as otherwise directed;

(f)   Coordinates technologies supporting NTMs with the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the Intelligence Community (IC) to support efforts to ensure that critical sensor systems are properly researched, developed, funded, operated, and deployed to detect and identify weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the means of their delivery;

(g)  Serves as the bureau manager of the "Key Verification Assets Fund” (V Fund); advises the Assistant Secretary and the deputy assistant secretaries on the disposition of the V Fund; and advocates annual funding requests;

(h)  Assists in the development of verification measures and regimes in order to support negotiations for existing and prospective agreements and commitments (and related consultations);

(i)   Coordinates closely with the relevant offices in the bureau to ensure that current and projected collection and analytical requirements related to arms control, verification, and compliance in their respective areas are clearly formulated, well understood, and given appropriate emphasis and attention; and

(j)   As required, briefs Congressional Committees and staff; and

(4)  Supports and houses the executive directorate responsibilities for the Secretary of State’s International Security Advisory Board (ISAB) under the direction of the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T).

1 FAM 444.3  Office of Multilateral and Nuclear Affairs (AVC/MNA)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Office of Multilateral and Nuclear Affairs (AVC/MNA):

(1)  Leads efforts to promote the vision of a safe, secure world without nuclear weapons through the identification, negotiation, assessment, and implementation of global and multinational arms control, transparency, and confidence building measures, and other measures;

(2)  In support of its mission, the office:

(a)  Promotes U.S. and international ratification of and entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty and effective implementation of the treaty’s verification regime;

(b)  Leads the development of U.S. policy on a Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (and on fissile material production moratoria) and leads the negotiation of such an agreement in this area;

(c)  Manages U.S. engagement in relevant international and multilateral discussions and negotiations;

(d)  Manages development of U.S. policy and international engagement on such other international multilateral arms control/disarmament agreements not within the specific purview of other AVC offices, such as the Seabed Arms Control Treaty, and the Environmental Modification Convention;

(e)  Assesses international compliance with relevant associated nuclear agreements and commitments; and

(f)   Promotes measures to establish consequences for violation of international agreements;

(3)  More generally, the office coordinates U.S. policy on arms control, verification and compliance issues before the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva; the First (Disarmament and International Security) Committee of the United Nations General Assembly (UNFC) in New York; the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO PrepCom) in Vienna; and the United Nations Disarmament Commission (UNDC) in New York;

(4)  The Office has lead responsibility within the U.S. Government for bilateral and multilateral efforts to implement nuclear disarmament-associated efforts and measures, including the CTBT and future multilateral treaties, agreements, and commitments.  It provides direct policy guidance and support to the U.S. delegations to multilateral organizations established to negotiate such agreements and commitments, including the CD, UNFC, CTBTO PrepCom, and UNDC.  Additionally, the office leads bilateral and multilateral consultations on matters within the purview of these bodies, including with the European Union’s Committee on Disarmament in the UN (CODUN) and other regional organizations;

(5)  The office also has lead responsibility within the Department for assessing the verifiability of prospective global and multilateral nuclear-related arms control and disarmament agreements and commitments and addressing the adequacy of monitoring and verification resources for existing global and multilateral nuclear-related arms control and disarmament agreements and commitments;

(6)  The office has the lead on U.S. assessments of other countries’ activities in terms of their compliance with specific global and multilateral nuclear-related arms control and disarmament agreements and commitments, as well as on developing the diplomatic approaches and leading the negotiations to resolve U.S. compliance concerns;

(7)  The office prepares those sections of the congressionally-mandated annual Compliance Report relating to multilateral and bilateral nuclear-related arms control and disarmament agreements and commitments, specifically the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, the Threshold Test Ban Treaty, the Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty, and unilaterally-declared nuclear testing moratoria;

(8)  MNA also advances relevant Administration policies before the Congress, the American public, and foreign audiences in coordination with the bureaus of Legislative Affairs, Public Affairs, and relevant regional/functional bureaus; and

(9)  Coordinates closely with the Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO) to ensure that current and projected collection and analytical requirements related to arms control, verification, and compliance in the above areas are clearly formulated, well understood, and given appropriate emphasis and attention.

1 FAM 444.4  Office of Strategic Stability and Deterrence Affairs (AVC/SSD)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Office of Strategic Stability and Deterrence (AVC/SSD):

(1)  Represents the Assistant Secretary and serves as lead within the Department for strategic arms control treaties; leads in the policy formulation for, and oversight of, negotiation, ratification, verification, compliance, and implementation aspects of current and prospective arms control agreements involving strategic, intermediate-range, and nonstrategic nuclear weapons systems;

(2)  Represents the Assistant Secretary and serves as lead within the Department for diplomatic engagement on strategic military issues through the formulation, negotiation, and oversight of policy initiatives that improve strategic stability and create the international security environment necessary to reduce the worldwide salience of nuclear arsenals.  The office engages with potential treaty partners to gauge interest in, and feasibility of, pursuing new arms control proposals;

(3)  Represents the Assistant Secretary as the lead within the Department and chairs interagency committees for reviewing and assessing compliance by foreign countries with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments involving nuclear warheads and strategic, intermediate-range and nonstrategic nuclear forces; incorporates compliance analyses and assessments into the President’s Annual Report to Congress on “Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments,” pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2593a and other reports, as appropriate, and, prepares verifiability assessments of arms control and nonproliferation agreements and commitments, as required under 22 U.S.C. 2577, or by direction;

(4)  The office has the following specific functions with respect to diplomatic engagement:

(a)  Represents the Assistant Secretary as the lead in the Department for initiatives on arms control, transparency, and confidence-building related to the development and deployment of delivery vehicles for weapons of mass destruction;

(b)  Represents the Assistant Secretary as the lead in the Department for issues related to the United States Nuclear Force Posture and related issues such as declaratory policy and deterrence, including the Extended Deterrence Dialogue with Japan and the Deterrence Strategy Committee with the Republic of Korea;

(c)  Together, with the Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs, shares responsibility for initiatives related to nonstrategic nuclear forces associated with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO);

(d)  Serves as the contact point for the Department with the United States Strategic Command (STRATCOM);

(e)  Represents the Assistant Secretary as the lead in the Department for initiatives related to the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives and similar, new transparency efforts; and

(f)   Builds relationships with nongovernmental organizations to foster exchanges on strategic issues; and

(5)  Coordinates closely with the Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO) to ensure that current and projected collection and analytical requirements related to arms control, verification, and compliance in the above areas are clearly formulated, well understood, and given appropriate emphasis and attention.

1 FAM 444.5  Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (AVC/NRRC)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (AVC/NRRC):

(1)  Operates the United States’ direct, dedicated, government-to-government communications systems on a 24-hour basis pursuant to National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 301 (1988) and the 1987 Soviet-American Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (NRRC) Agreement (as revised in 2000), to support implementation of arms control and other security agreements;

(2)  Acts as the focal point within the U.S. Government for message receipt and handling of notifications and other communications required by, in connection with, and in support of, existing nuclear, chemical, conventional, and cyber arms control treaties and security-building agreements between the United States and over 55 foreign governments and international organizations on a 24-hour basis;

(3)  Translates incoming notifications and other messages; disseminates the notifications and messages received to appropriate U.S. Government departments and agencies; and executes operational alerts, as necessary, for time-sensitive notifications requiring immediate attention;

(4)  Executes final review, handling, and transmission of outgoing U.S. Government notifications and other messages to counterpart foreign governments or international organizations, pursuant to the same arms control and security-building agreements; disseminates these notifications and messages to other U.S. Government agencies and departments; and executes operational alerts, as necessary, for time-sensitive notifications requiring immediate attention;

(5)  Participates in interagency policy groups responsible for existing and prospective arms control and other security agreements requiring communications support in order to ensure effective technology infrastructure; translation support; and message formatting, receipt, handling, and dissemination;

(6)  Advises Department policy and operational offices on communications issues affecting new arms control and international security agreements, assessing possible NRRC roles in implementing communication protocols for new agreements while adhering to national security and presidential directives;

(7)  Participates, as necessary, in negotiations related to existing and prospective arms control and other security-building agreements requiring communication support;

(8)  Provides technical assistance to, and conducts technical exchanges with, foreign governments and international organizations on the operation of national communication systems for arms control and other security-building agreements; and

(9)  Provides guidance in developing U.S. Government communications procedures and technology to ensure that NRRC operational readiness can support national security goals and objectives.

1 FAM 444.6  Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs (AVC/ESA)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs (AVC/ESA):

(1)  Provides policy guidance to senior members of the Department of State and advises the Assistant Secretary for Arms Control, Verification and Compliance and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security on the matters described herein;

(2)  Represents the Assistant Secretary as the lead within the Department for developing U.S. policy relative to existing and prospective European and Euro-Atlantic arms control agreements and security arrangements concerning conventional and nuclear weapons and forces, including the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE); the Vienna Document 2011 Confidence-and Security-Building Measures (CSBMs); the Treaty on Open Skies; and arms control elements of the Dayton Peace Accords; develops tactics for achieving that policy; chairs related interagency committees; and drafts negotiating instructions on European and Euro-Atlantic arms control issues; is responsible for leading U.S. ratification of such treaties to which the U.S. is a party; coordinates U.S. participation in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe’s (OSCE) Forum for Security Cooperation (FSC); supports the U.S. Chief Arms Control Delegate in the U.S. Mission to the OSCE and provides delegation members on a rotating basis from Washington; supports the U.S. Mission to NATO; supports the AVC Bureau Assistant Secretary as U.S. Chair of the NATO Arms Control Committee; provides the U.S. Representative to the NATO High-Level Task Force (HLTF) and the NATO Verification Coordinating Committee; provides the U.S. Representative to NATO committees on nuclear weapons forces and arms control; supports the US Mission to the EU; and represents the United States, as appropriate, on these issues at international meetings and conferences;

(3)  Represents the Assistant Secretary as the lead within the Department for addressing the verification, compliance, compliance diplomacy, and compliance enforcement aspects of existing and prospective Euro-Atlantic arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and commitments; leads international negotiations and consultations related to the verification, compliance, and compliance enforcement aspects of these agreements and commitments; reviews the verification and compliance performance of countries being considered for membership in multilateral nonproliferation regimes and arrangements; prepares verifiability assessments of these agreements as required under 22 U.S.C. 2577, or by direction; and prepares compliance analyses and assessments for the President’s Annual Report on “Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Disarmament Agreements and Commitments,” pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2593a, as well as specialized compliance reports required under Senate Resolutions of Ratification, and other reports, as appropriate;

(4)  Supports efforts to promote Confidence-and-Security-Building Measures (CSBMs) in regions of the world beyond Europe, in connection with OSCE efforts at wider sharing of OSCE norms, principles, and commitments with Mediterranean and Asian states;

(5)  Analyzes military expenditures and arms transfers by foreign countries and prepares, pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2593b, the annual report, "World Military Expenditures and Arms Transfers";

(6)  As required, briefs Congressional Committees and staff; and

(7)  Coordinates closely with the Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO) to ensure that current and projected collection and analytical requirements related to arms control, verification, and compliance in the above areas are clearly formulated, well understood, and given appropriate emphasis and attention.

1 FAM 444.7  Office of Emerging Security Challenges (AVC/ESC)

(CT:ORG-375;   10-06-2015)

The Office of Emerging Security Challenges (AVC/ESC):

(1)  Provides analysis, options, and recommendations to senior members of the Department of State and advises the Assistant Secretary and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security on all policy, programmatic, technical, and threat issues related to missile defense systems and cooperation, outer space security issues and transparency and confidence building measures, cyber strategic stability, and Arctic and Antarctic security issues;

(2)  Leads the State Department’s efforts to enhance ballistic missile defense cooperation among Allies and Partners including in bilateral and multilateral fora, including at NATO, the NATO-Russia Council and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and also leads efforts to promote predictability related to missile defense deployments with Russia and China;

(3)  Provides the Department of State representative or the “technical advisor” to numerous U.S. interagency delegations involved in consultations and negotiations on missile defense cooperation with allies, friends, and Russia;

(4)  Leads the Department of State’s efforts to promote outer space security efforts, including transparency and confidence building measures (TCBMs) on all issues related to strategic space arms control and military-related space policy issues, including bilateral Space Security Dialogues and multilateral issues such as the European Union’s International Code of Conduct on Outer Space.  AVC/ESC supports the formulation and implementation of military- and intelligence-related space policies, including the space-situational awareness information sharing and maritime domain awareness activities of the Department of Defense.  AVC/ESC supports the efforts of the Bureau of Oceans, and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs at the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, including the Working Group on the Long-term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities.  AVC/ESC supports the efforts of the Bureau of Intelligence and Research to formulate Department of State positions on  intelligence-related space policy issues;

(5)  Plays a leading role in the efforts of the Department of State to promote transparency, enhance cooperation, and build confidence in cyber security issues.  AVC/ESC supports the Office of the Department of State Coordinator for Cyber Issues in negotiating and implementing bilateral and regional confidence-building and clarifying international norms of behavior for state conduct in cyber space;

(6)  Leads the Department’s efforts to ensure peace and stability in the Polar regions, including seeking to maintaining and preserving the Arctic as a region free of conflict and the arms control provisions contained in the Antarctic Treaty;

(7)  Leads the Department’s public diplomacy effort with regard to related missile defense, space policy, cyber security, and Arctic/Antarctic issues and prepares materials (e.g., fact sheets) for use by Department of State officials, and provides public speakers for domestic and overseas forums; and

(8)  Briefs Congressional Committees and staffs on related missile defense, space policy, cyber security and Arctic/Antarctic security issues.


1 FAM Exhibit 441.2  
Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance (AVC)

U.S. Representative for the Conference on Disarmament
(AVC/CD)
 - Title: U.S. Representative for the Conference on Disarmament (AVC/CD) - Description: U.S. Representative for the Conference on Disarmament (AVC/CD)U.S. Commissioners to the INF Treaty and New START Treaty  - Title: U.S. Commissioners to the INF Treaty and New START Treaty  - Description: U.S. Commissioners to the INF Treaty and New START Treaty Chief U.S. Arms Control Delegate, U.S. Mission to the OSCE
(AVC/OSCE)
 - Title: Chief U.S. Arms Control Delegate, U.S. Mission to the OSCE (AVC/OSCE) - Description: Chief U.S. Arms Control Delegate, U.S. Mission to the OSCE (AVC/OSCE)Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs
(AVC/CBW)
 - Title: Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs (AVC/CBW) - Description: Office of Chemical and Biological Weapons Affairs (AVC/CBW)Office of Multilateral and Nuclear Affairs 
(AVC/MNA)

 - Title: Office of Multilateral and Nuclear Affairs (AVC/MNA)  - Description: Office of Multilateral and Nuclear Affairs 
(AVC/MNA) 
Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs 
(AVC/ESA)
 - Title: Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs  - Description: Office of Euro-Atlantic Security Affairs 
(AVC/ESA)
Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (AVC/NRRC) - Title: Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (AVC/NRRC) - Description: Nuclear Risk Reduction Center (AVC/NRRC)DAS for Emerging Security Challenges and Defense Policy 
(AVC/FO)
 - Title: DAS for Emerging Security Challenges and Defense Policy  - Description: DAS for Emerging Security Challenges and Defense Policy 
(AVC/FO)
Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary - Title: Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary - Description: Principal Deputy Assistant SecretaryAssistant Secretary
(AVC)
 - Title: Assistant Secretary (AVC) - Description: Assistant Secretary (AVC)DAS for Verification, Planning and European Security
(AVC/FO)
 - Title: DAS for Verification, Planning and European Security - Description: DAS for Verification, Planning and European Security
(AVC/FO)
Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach
(AVC/VPO)
 - Title: Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO) - Description: Office of Verification, Planning, and Outreach (AVC/VPO(CT:ORG-307;   05-09-2013)
Office of Strategic Stability and Deterrence Affairs (AVC/SSD) - Title: Office of Strategic Stability and Deterrence Affairs (AVC/SSD) - Description: Office of Strategic Stability and Deterrence Affairs (AVC/SSD),Office of Emerging Security Challenges 
(AVC/ESC)
 - Title: Office of Emerging Security Challenges (AVC/ESC) - Description: Office of Emerging Security Challenges (AVC/ESC),U.S. Representative for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons
(AVC/OPCW)
 - Title: U.S. Representative for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons - Description: U.S. Representative for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons
(AVC/OPCW)
,Comprehensive Nuclear – Test Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission 
(AVC/CTBT)
 - Title: Comprehensive Nuclear – Test Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission  - Description: Comprehensive Nuclear – Test Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission 
(AVC/CTBT)
,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line,Line