1 FAM 450 

BUREAU of INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND NONPROLIFERATION (ISN)

(CT:ORG-452;   05-30-2018)
(Office of Origin:  ISN/EX)

1 FAM 451  ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND NONPROLIFERATION (ISN)

1 FAM 451.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

The Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN):

(1)  Reports directly to the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security;

(2)  Assists the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security in discharging their responsibilities for continuous supervision and general direction of international security and nonproliferation issues;

(3)  Serves as principal adviser to Department principals relating to international security and nonproliferation.  To this end, the Assistant Secretary oversees development and implementation of U.S. policies to curb the proliferation to both state and nonstate actors of all types of weapons of mass destruction, missiles for WMD delivery, and conventional weapons by using the full array of diplomatic, financial, defense, law enforcement, rapid response, and other measures;

(4)  Supervises three deputy assistant secretaries, who, in turn, manage the day-to-day operations of ISN, exercising principal oversight over the management and staffing of subordinate organizations and the development of policies and programs to assure responsiveness to shifting Administration and Departmental priorities;

(5)  Directs ISN staff in providing policy guidance and liaison with all relevant U.S. Government agencies on nonproliferation, counterproliferation, and other matters related to international security policy;

(6)  Represents the United States in negotiations, in bilateral and multilateral settings, on issues related to nonproliferation, counterproliferation, and other matters concerning international security policy;

(7)  Ensures effective coordination between the Department and Congress on international security and nonproliferation issues; and

(8)  Engages in public diplomacy and outreach to domestic and international audiences to support U.S. Government and Department international security and nonproliferation objectives.  The Assistant Secretary oversees bureau budget planning and operations to ensure efficient achievement of operational goals and stewardship of financial resources and oversees the drafting and coordination of the bureau’s strategic resource plan, as well as other budget documents and justifications.

1 FAM 451.2  Organization

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

An organization chart of the Bureau for International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN) is found at 1 FAM Exhibit 451.2.

1 FAM 451.3  Definitions

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

Biological Weapons Convention (1975) (BWC):  The global treaty banning the development, production, stockpiling, and acquisition of biological weapons.

Chemical Weapons Convention (1997) (CWC):  The global treaty outlawing developing, producing, acquiring, stockpiling, retaining, transferring, or using chemical weapons.

Confidence-building measures (CBMs):  Measures requiring effective and concrete actions concerning the military activities and force structure of the states concerned and aimed at reducing tension and strengthening confidence and security among those states.

G8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (G8 Global Partnership; GP):  The G8 Global Partnership is an initiative to counter the spread of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) worldwide, to which the United States has pledged significant funding.  The GP has been extended beyond 2012 to address global terrorism and proliferation threats.

Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT):  The Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism is a global effort that aims to enhance partner capacity to prevent, protect against, and respond to the threat of a nuclear terrorism event.

Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (GNDA):  The GNDA is a framework for detecting (through technical and non-technical means), analyzing, and reporting on nuclear and other radioactive materials that are out of regulatory control.

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA):  The international organization established by treaty (the IAEA Statute) in 1957 to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy and apply safeguards against its diversion to military purposes.

Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI):  The Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) is a global effort that aims to stop trafficking of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), their delivery systems, and related materials to and from states and nonstate actors of proliferation concern.

Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; also known as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT):  The treaty that commits its 190 parties to prevent nuclear proliferation.  It acknowledges five parties as “nuclear-weapon states” and commits them not to assist non-nuclear-weapon states parties to obtain nuclear weapons.  The latter states commit not to receive such weapons and to accept IAEA safeguards on all of their nuclear activities.  The treaty also commits parties to the peaceful use of nuclear energy that is consistent with its nonproliferation obligations and to negotiate “effective measures” on nuclear, as well as general and complete, disarmament.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540:  Established, for the first time, binding obligations on states under Chapter VII of the UN Charter to develop and enforce appropriate legal and regulatory measures against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and their means of delivery.

Weapons of mass destruction (WMD):  Nuclear, chemical, biological, or radiological weapons.

1 FAM 451.4  Authorities

1 FAM 451.4-1  Constitutional and Executive Authorities

(CT:ORG-452;   05-30-2018)

Constitutional and executive authorities include:

(1)  The President’s constitutional authority for conducting foreign affairs (Article II; see also 22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.);

(2)  The most current edition of the National Security Strategy issued by the White House;

(3)  The National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction issued by the White House in December 2002;

(4)  The National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats issued by the White House in December 2009;

(5)  Executive Order (E.O.) 13637 as modified by E.O. 13284 – foreign policy authorities, and the following Executive Orders, including any amendments thereto:

·         E.O. 12851

·         E.O. 12938

·         E.O. 12959

·         E.O. 12981

·         E.O. 13059

·         E.O. 13313

·         E.O. 13458

·         E.O. 13551

(6)  Executive Order (E.O.) 12938 as modified by E.O. 13094 – Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction and E.O. 13382 – Blocking Property of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferators and Their Supporters;

(7)  Export Administration Regulations Parts 736, 738, 740, 742, 744, 746, 750, 752, 772, 774; and

(8)  National Security Presidential Directives 17, 19, 20, 23, and 57 (classified).

1 FAM 451.4-2  Legislative Authorities

(CT:ORG-452;   05-30-2018)

Legislative authorities include:

(1)  Secretary of State’s authority for the day to day conduct of foreign relations (22 U.S.C. 2656);

(2)  Section 504 of the FREEDOM Support Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-511), 22 U.S.C. Chapter 67, Subchapter IV, Section 5854);

(3)  The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended;

(4)  Non-Proliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs (NADR) heading of the annual Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Acts;

(5)  Section 620H, Foreign Appropriations Act of 1961, as amended, and annual Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Acts;

(6)  Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (AEA);

(7)  Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978;

(8)  Export-Import Bank Act, section 2(b)(4);

(9)  Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 1994;

(10) Taiwan Relations Act;

(11) Section 1523 of the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999;

(12) Iran-Iraq Arms Non-Proliferation Act of 1992, sections 1604-1608;

(13) Iran, North Korea, and Syria Nonproliferation Act (originally Iran Nonproliferation Act of 2000);

(14) Arms Export Control Act:

(a)  Missile licensing and sanctions, sections 71-74 (22 U.S.C. 2797);

(b)  Chemical and Biological weapons sanctions section 81 (22 U.S.C. 2798); and

(c)  Nuclear sanctions, sections 101-103 (“Symington amendment” and “Glenn amendment”), 22 U.S.C. 2799aa;

(15) Export Administration Act of 1979, as it may be extended by act of Congress or authorized by Executive Orders pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, in particular:

(a)  Export controls on missile technology (section 6(l)) and chemical and biological weapons (section 6(m));

(b)  Missile technology sanctions (section 11B); and

(c)  Chemical and biological weapons proliferation sanctions (section 11C);

(16) Land Remote Sensing Policy Act of 1992;

(17) Public Law 104-201, Section 1064, National Defense Authorization Act of 1997 (“Kyl-Bingaman” for remote sensing);

(18) Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 212(1)(3)(A) (Visa Mantis), 8 U.S.C. 1182 (a)(3)(A);

(19) Arms Control and Disarmament Act, in particular 22 U.S.C. 2551 (Congressional Statement of Purpose); 22 U.S.C. 2573 (Policy Formulation); 22 U.S.C. 2574 (Negotiation Management ); 22 U.S.C. 2578 (Negotiating Records); 22 U.S.C. 2576 (Arms Control Information); and 22 U.S.C. 2577 (Verification of Compliance);

(20) 22 U.S.C. 2785 (End-use Monitoring);

(21) CBW Control and Warfare Elimination Act of 1991, 22 U.S.C. 5601-5606;

(22) Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003, Section 1308 (Public Law 107-228);

(23) International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA), section 204(c); National Emergencies Act (NEA), section 401(c); 50 U.S.C. 1641(c) (expenditures for national emergencies declared under IEEPA); and 50 U.S.C. 1703(c) (6-month reports on national emergencies declared under IEEPA);

(24) Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 (limiting applicability of sanctions to agricultural commodities);

(25) The Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act of 1998, including 22 U.S.C. 6711 (Designation of U.S. National Authority); and 22 U.S.C. 6712 (Transfer of Functions from ACDA);

(26) United States Additional Protocol Implementation Act (Public Law 109-401);

(27) Henry J. Hyde United States-India Peaceful Atomic Energy Cooperation Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-401); and the United States-India Nuclear Cooperation Approval and Nonproliferation Enhancement Act, 2008 (Public Law 110-369);

(28) Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-172), regarding WMD-related sanctions;

(29) Iran Freedom and Counter Proliferation Act of 2012; and

(30) Comprehensive Iran Sanctions Accountability and Divestment Act, 2010, (Public Law 111-195), expanding sanctions under the Iran Sanctions Act and establishing additional sanctions.

1 FAM 451.4-3  Authorities under Treaties, Conventions, and Agreements

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

Authorities under Treaties and conventions include:

(1)  Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.  The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) was ratified by the United States in 1969 and entered into force on March 5, 1970.  Among the obligations of the United States under the NPT are not to assist nonnuclear-weapon states (as defined by the Treaty) to acquire nuclear weapons; to ensure IAEA safeguards are applied to specified nuclear exports; to work toward nuclear disarmament; and to cooperate in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy consistent with the NPT’s nonproliferation obligations.  The United States is one of the three Depositary Governments for the NPT;

(2)  Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.  Protocols I and II of this Treaty were ratified by the United States in 1981 and 1971, respectively.  Among the obligations of the United States under these Protocols are not to deploy nuclear weapons in U.S. territories in the Treaty zone and not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against Treaty parties;

(3)  South Pacific Nuclear-Free Zone Treaty, entered into force August 6, 1985.  The United States has signed but not yet ratified Protocols 1, 2 and 3 to the Treaty, which would obligate the United States not to manufacture, station, or test nuclear weapons in any U.S. territories in the Treaty zone and not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against Treaty parties;

(4)  African Nuclear-Weapon Free Zone Treaty, entered into force April 11, 1996.  The United States has signed but not yet ratified Protocols I and II to the Treaty, which would obligate the United States not to test or assist or encourage the testing of any nuclear explosive device in the Treaty zone and not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against Treaty parties;

(5)  The Southeast Asian Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (SEANWFZ) of 1995, entered into force on March 28, 1997.  The United States has not signed or ratified the Protocol to the Treaty, which would obligate the United States not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against Treaty parties;

(6)  The Central Asian Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone (CANWFZ) treaty, entered into force March 21, 2009.  The United States has signed but not yet ratified the Protocol the Treaty, which would obligate the United States not to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against Treaty parties.

(7)  The Agreement between the United States and the IAEA for the application of safeguards in the United States was ratified and entered into force in 1980.  The primary obligation of the United States under this agreement is to permit the IAEA to apply safeguards at facilities in the United States, excluding only those facilities associated with activities with direct national security significance to the United States;

(8)  The Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States of America, with Annexes.  The Protocol obligates the United States to accept the measures in the Model Additional Protocol, excluding only information, activities and locations with direct national security significance to the United States.  It was signed at Vienna June 12, 1998, the U.S. Senate gave its advice and consent to ratification on March 31, 2004, and it entered into force on January 6, 2009;

(9)  The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction.  The Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) was ratified by the United States on March 26, 1975, and entered into force on that same date.  The primary obligations of the United States under this Convention are not to develop, produce, stockpile, or otherwise acquire or retain biological weapons; and not to transfer, assist, encourage, or induce the manufacture or acquisition of biological weapons

(10)The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction.  The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) was ratified by the United States on April 25, 1997, and entered into force on April 29, 1997.  The primary obligations of the United States under this Convention are to destroy and not use, develop, produce, otherwise acquire, stockpile or retain chemical weapons; and not to assist, encourage or induce, in any way, anyone to engage in chemical weapons activities;

(11)International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism, entered into force July 7, 2007, that the United States signed but has not yet ratified;

(12)Protocol of 2005 to the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation entered into force July 28, 2010, that the United States signed but has not yet ratified;

(13)Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and its Amendment of July 8, 2005, signed by the United States but not yet ratified (also has not entered into force);

(14)Convention on Nuclear Safety;

(15)Joint Treaty on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management;

(16)Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, an instrument of ratification deposited by the United States May 21, 2008, but has not yet entered into force;

(17)Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident; and

(18)Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident.

1 FAM 451.4-4  Authorities under Multilateral Nonproliferation Regimes

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

Authorities under multilateral nonproliferation regimes include:

(1)  Australia Group Guidelines for Transfers of Sensitive Chemical or Biological Items;

(2)  Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) Guidelines;

(3)  Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) Guidelines for nuclear and nuclear-related exports;

(4)  Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies Basic Elements;

(5)  Hague Code of Conduct Against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCOC); and

(6)  Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism Statement of Principles.

1 FAM 451.4-5  United Nations Authorities

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

United Nations authorities include:

(1)  Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency.  The Statute that established the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an independent international organization related to the United Nations system, came into force on July 29, 1957.  The United States was an original member of the IAEA and serves as the Depositary Government.  Among the obligations of the United States as a member of the IAEA are to provide annual assessed financial resources and to adhere to the provisions of the Statute in regard to U.S. activities, such as the supply of nuclear material through the IAEA, and U.S. participation in meetings such as the IAEA Board of Governors and the annual General Conference;

(2)  Proliferation-related UN Security Council Resolutions (UNSCR):  UNSCRs 1540, 1673, 1810, 1887, and future Resolutions related to proliferation.  ISN has direct policy authority for all matters related to implementation of these resolutions;

(3)  North Korea-related UNSCRs 1695, 1718, 1874, and future Resolutions related to North Korea proliferation; and

(4)  Iran-related UNSCRs 1696, 1737, 1747, 1803, 1835, 1929, and future Resolutions related to Iran proliferation.

1 FAM 451.4-6  Other Authorities

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

Other authorities include:

(1)  Nuclear Cooperation Agreements pursuant to the AEA with Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Norway, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, South Africa, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, Euratom, the IAEA, and, through appropriate channels, Taiwan, and any future such agreements.  Euratom comprises the following Member States:  Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxemburg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom; and

(2)  PSI Bilateral Shipboarding Agreements:  These agreements facilitate bilateral cooperation to prevent illicit shipments of weapons of mass destruction, their delivery systems, or related materials, by establishing procedures to board and search vessels registered in the United States or the partner country that are suspected of carrying such shipments in international waters.

(3)  U.S.-Russian Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.  This agreement provides the framework for subsequent negotiations and cooperation regarding each Party’s obligations to dispose of excess weapon-grade plutonium.

1 FAM 452  OFFICES DIRECTLY ATTACHED TO THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY

1 FAM 452.1  U.S. Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation (ISN/SRNN)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The U.S. Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation (ISN/SRNN):

(1)  Serves as a U.S. Special Representative on the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) and in support of activities to strengthen the global nuclear nonproliferation regime;

(2)  Maintains close relationships with the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Affairs, and the Director of the Office of Multilateral Nuclear and Security Affairs in the Bureau for International Security and Nonproliferation;

(3)  In coordination with ISN and ISN/MNSA, develops and coordinates executive branch policy with respect to the NPT and strengthening the global nuclear nonproliferation regime, and develops strategies to implement these policies;

(4)  Coordinates with and is supported by the NPT interagency working group.  The U.S. Special Representative represents the Department of State on matters related to the NPT and other nuclear nonproliferation matters as assigned by the Assistant Secretary or Under Secretary, including their negotiation, ratification, and implementation.  ISN/SRNN conducts bilateral and multilateral discussions and negotiations on matters pertaining to the NPT and other nuclear nonproliferation matters as assigned by the Assistant Secretary or Under Secretary;

(5)  Serves as U.S. representative at the NPT preparatory committee meetings and at NPT review conferences; and

(6)  In coordination with the bureaus of Legislative Affairs and Public Affairs, serves as a principal spokesperson for the Administration and the Department of State before Congress and the public on NPT matters and other nuclear nonproliferation matters as assigned by the Assistant Secretary or Under Secretary.

1 FAM 452.2  Coordinator for Threat Reduction Programs (ISN/TR)

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

The Coordinator for Threat Reduction Programs (ISN/TR):

(1)  Oversees the Department’s participation in interagency efforts to coordinate between State’s threat reduction programs and those of other agencies;

(2)  Represents State’s threat reduction programs to foreign, Congressional, and public audiences;

(3)  Engages with foreign governments on cooperative threat reduction, promoting coordination and cooperation with the United States and its cooperative threat reduction efforts;

(4)  Serves as U.S. representative to the G-8 working group on the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, and leads international diplomacy, Congressional advocacy, and interagency coordination related to the Global Partnership; and

(5)  Oversees coordination of Department efforts in, and leads international diplomacy for, the President’s 4-year effort to secure all vulnerable nuclear materials worldwide; and leads Department efforts in support of nuclear security summits and follow-on activities.

1 FAM 452.3  Fissile Material Negotiator (ISN/FM)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Fissile Material Negotiator (ISN/FM):

(1)  Negotiates arrangements necessary to secure the proper disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium in Russia, including the associated verification agreement;

(2)  Oversees coordination of Department involvement in interagency and international efforts, and leads in international diplomacy, related to this mission; and 

(3)  Works with the Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security (ISN/NESS) and other offices in support of these objectives.

1 FAM 452.4  Special Negotiator for Nonproliferation (ISN/SN)

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

The Special Negotiator for Nonproliferation (ISN/SN):

(1)  Leads negotiations and representational activities as directed by the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation; and

(2)  Works with relevant ISN offices in support of these objectives.

1 FAM 452.5  Office of the Executive Director (ISN/EX)

(CT:ORG-252;   10-26-2011)

The Office of the Executive Director (ISN/EX):

(1)  Reports to the Assistant Secretaries for the bureaus of International Security and Nonproliferation, Political-Military Affairs, and Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance.  This office is housed administratively in the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation;

(2)  Assists the Assistant Secretaries in managing the three bureaus through the centralized provision of executive management and administrative services, including financial management, general services, human resources management, and information technology.  ISN/EX provides direction for all administrative and management activities, including program development for the bureaus, and participation in various delegations; and

(3)  Acts as the coordinator and communicator with the various bureau offices to provide an awareness of, and assistance on, overall Department administrative policy requirements.

1 FAM 452.5-1  Human Resources Division (ISN/EX/HR)

(CT:ORG-238;   04-28-2011)

The Human Resources Division (ISN/EX/HR) coordinates personnel services for each bureau, including advising and processing documents pertaining to position classification; recruitment and appointments; assignments; reassignments and transfers; equal employment opportunity; career development counseling; training; employee services; awards; reporting; and special projects.  ISN/EX/HR supervises the control and monitoring of staffing levels and the distribution of permanent and temporary employees within the organizational units of each bureau.

1 FAM 452.5-2  General Services Division (ISN/EX/GS)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The General Services Division (ISN/EX/GS):

(1)  Provides administrative support services for each bureau including procurement, asset, and space management.  ISN/EX/GS works with the Department’s internal service providers to address contracts, office space, security, safety, communications, equipment and furnishings, parking, and other services, as appropriate.  ISN/EX/GS utilizes the Department’s strategic sourcing acquisition application to achieve economies and conducts periodic process analyses to measure performance and to ensure efficiencies through continuous-process improvements;

(2)  Provides travel management services for each bureau including office allocations, authorization approvals and advances, voucher reviews, and payment processing; and

(3)  Division chief serves as the Management Control Coordinator for the three bureaus; coordinates the Management Control Statement of Assurance in accordance with reporting requirements under the Federal Manager's Financial Integrity Act (FMFIA), and serves as the overseas liaison.

1 FAM 452.5-3  Resource Management Division (ISN/EX/RM)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Resource Management Division (ISN/EX/RM):

(1)  Formulates and prepares detailed budget materials required through the Department's annual Bureau Resource Request/OMB Budget Submission/Congressional Budget Submission cycle for the three bureaus.  ISN/EX/RM coordinates annual bureau budget hearings and ad hoc resource meetings with various offices within the ISN, AVC, and PM Bureaus and the Bureau of Budget and Planning (BP).  Serves as T Bureau liaison with various offices within the ISN, PM, and AVC bureaus and Bureau of Budget and Planning (BP) on resource matters; and

(2)  Develops administrative policies for the management of the bureaus’ financial resources and provides management analysis and services to the bureaus to improve resource utilization and promote efficiencies and economies.  The division coordinates department inspections and audits, reprogramming, and other administrative reporting requirements and ensures that execution of domestic diplomatic engagement resources is in accordance with applicable regulations and that internal controls are applied accordingly.  ISN/EX/RM manages the processing of interagency agreements, resource allocations, allotment transfers, suballotments, overseas allotments, and representation; and

(3)  Manages the processing of interagency agreements, resource allocations, allotment transfers, sub allotments, overseas allotments, representation, and diplomatic engagement and foreign operations accounts.

1 FAM 452.5-4  Technology Division (ISN/EX/TD)

(CT:ORG-252;   10-26-2011)

The Technology Division (ISN/EX/TD):

(1)  Provides general and specialized information technology systems for office automation, communications, decision support (i.e., collaboration and data modeling, and data management services) for the International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN); Political-Military Affairs (PM); and Arms Control, Verification and Compliance (AVC) bureaus.  The office provides information technology and computer support to the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security as needed;

(2)  Implements high-quality information technology supporting verification, transparency, compliance research, and analysis for all arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament regimes, which includes the following:  automated data-exchange-based confidence-building measures and initiatives, electronic licensing data standards for industry and interagency review, Web site collaboration with Department of Defense partners, and technical consultative support as needed to international organizations supporting arms control agreements and treaties, e.g., the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW);

(3)  Develops and implements mechanisms for efficient and secure electronic exchange of information among partners pursuant to arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements, commitments, and other control regimes;

(4)  Maintains on behalf of the Department of State, which is the designated U. S. Government archivist, a comprehensive diplomatic record of arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament negotiations, as well as a comprehensive database on verification and compliance information pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2577a and 22 U.S.C. 2578;

(5)  Coordinates with the Nuclear Risk Reduction Center to leverage bilateral and multilateral communication and collaboration systems that support government-to-government communication exchanges; and

(6)  Performs such other tasks, as needed or as directed by the Assistant Secretary, related to the development, employment, or improvement of information technology systems or software for purposes related to verification, compliance, compliance diplomacy, compliance enforcement, and implementation and provides support to the T bureaus pursuant to paragraph b of this section.

1 FAM 453  DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR NON-NUCLEAR AND COUNTER-PROLIFERATION (ISN/NNCP)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-2013)

The Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation (ISN/NNCP):

(1)  Reports to the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation;

(2)  As required, serves as Acting Assistant Secretary in the absence of the Assistant Secretary, performing all functions of that position;

(3)  Advises the Assistant Secretary on the formulation and development of resource requirements for the bureau;

(4)  Supervises the offices of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction (CATR), Counter-Proliferation Initiatives (CPI), Missile, Biological, and Chemical Nonproliferation (MBC), and the Biological Policy Staff (BPS).  ISN/NNCP coordinates the bureau’s work on related issues; provides policy advice to the Assistant Secretary, the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, and other senior U.S. Government officials on these issues; represents the Department in interagency considerations of these matters; and organizes and chairs international negotiations with other governments in these areas;

(5)  As required, testifies before Congressional committees; and

(6)  Engages in public diplomacy and outreach to domestic and international audiences to support Administration and Department nonproliferation objectives.

1 FAM 453.1  Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction (ISN/CATR)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-2013)

The Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction (ISN/CATR):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation;

(2)  Implements policies and programs to curb irresponsible or destabilizing transfers of conventional weapons, including the proliferation of major weapons systems and heavy military equipment (e.g., tanks, aircraft, missiles), and such advanced conventional weapons as man-portable air-defense systems (MANPADS), sensors and lasers, and precision-guided munitions;

(3)  Leads U.S. efforts to develop and implement policy to promote bilateral and multilateral coordination in export control policy for conventional weapons and related dual-use technology.  ISN/CATR leads U.S. participation in the Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual Use Goods and Technologies and U.S. participation in the Arms Trade Treaty process.  ISN/CATR serves as the U.S. National Point of Contact on the UN Register of Conventional Arms;

(4)  Coordinates State Department support for Commerce Department National Security export controls, including policy formulation and implementation, and the development of State views on Commerce export license applications and export control regulations.  ISN/CATR supports the Department’s participation in the Advisory Committee on Export Policy and Export Administration Review Board;

(5)  Reviews proposed U.S. exports to ensure they do not inadvertently contribute to conventional weapons proliferation and reviews, screens, and provides recommendations on visa applications for conventional proliferation concerns and consistency with U. S. nonproliferation policy;

(6)  Leads development and implementation of U.S. policy on the export of commercial space technologies, including remote-sensing technology and products.  ISN/CATR chairs the Remote Sensing Interagency Working Group (RSIWG) and negotiates and implements government-to-government agreements concerning exports of remote-sensing satellites and technology, and Technology Safeguards Agreements establishing security arrangements for launch of U.S.-licensed satellites and third-party satellites.  ISN/CATR represents the bureau on issues related to Commercial Space Launch Agreements;

(7)  Implements U.S. laws and Executive Orders relating to sanctions for the transfer of conventional weapons and related technologies, to include preparing recommendations for Department decision makers and related reports for Congress;

(8)  Leads U.S. Government efforts to impede and interdict specific shipments of conventional weapons and related sensitive dual-use items of concern worldwide.  ISN/CATR chairs the interagency Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG) and works with the Office of Counterproliferation Initiatives (ISN/CPI) on relevant in-transit shipments; and

(9)  Drafts sections of nonproliferation reports to Congress related to the proliferation of conventional weapons.

1 FAM 453.2  Office of Counterproliferation Initiatives (ISN/CPI)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Counterproliferation Initiatives (ISN/CPI):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation;

(2)  Develops, implements, and enhances policies to promote and implement the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI); leads outreach to gain additional adherents to the PSI; acts as PSI focal point to provide assistance and information to all PSI participants; and supports the Operational Experts Group and the PSI exercise program;

(3)  Develops, implements, and enhances efforts to interdict or deny in-transit shipments of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and their means of delivery, working with other ISN offices as appropriate.  ISN/CPI supports the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation in the role of the Department’s representative at NSC-chaired interdiction meetings held pursuant to Presidential Directive;

(4)  Through the Special Coordinator for UNSCR 1540, provides guidance and instruction to the USUN on all matters related to implementation of the resolution; serves as the U.S. Government National Point of Contact to the 1540 Committee; and leads interdisciplinary teams within the Department, interagency, and international community to provide policy direction and coordination on implementation of the Resolution;

(5)  Promotes efforts to ensure that countries are complying with their obligations under UN Security Council Resolutions relating to nonproliferation sanctions, including UNSCRs 1695, 1696, 1718, 1737, 1747, 1803, 1874, 1887, 1929, 2094 and future such resolutions;

(6)  Establishes a direct relationship on counterproliferation issues with the National Counterproliferation Center and other Intelligence Community organizations in coordination with INR.

(7)  Leads U.S. Government efforts to impede and interdict specific foreign transfers of items to nuclear programs and end-users of concern and chairs the interagency Nuclear Interdiction Action Group (NIAG);

(8)  Implements U.S. nuclear sanctions under all relevant laws and Executive Orders.  The office’s duties include initiating cases, seeking intelligence support and interagency advice, preparing the required decision memoranda, and implementing the decisions taken;

(9)  Implements the Department of State’s responsibilities under Executive Order 13382, including developing and clearing State Department designation evidentiary packages; coordinating the clearance of Treasury Department designation evidentiary packages; developing and implementing roll-out strategies; and coordinating public affairs activities;

(10) Co-chairs with Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, the Executive Order 13382 Working Group and supports the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation in the role of the Department’s representative at NSC-chaired counterproliferation finance meetings held pursuant to Presidential Directive;

(11) Identifies and tracks proliferant procurement networks and related critical technologies and suppliers; implements targeted strategies to disrupt and permanently shut down such networks supplying nation-state programs and nonstate actors of proliferation concern; and works to ensure that steps are taken to close the loopholes exploited by such networks; and

(12) Develops and implements targeted strategies to counter proliferation worldwide, including financial and/or diplomatic measures.  ISN/CPI is responsible for counterproliferation dialogues held with key regional partners and efforts to identify strategies designed to address problems associated with exports, reexports, and transshipments of cargo of proliferation concern.

 1 FAM 453.3  Office of Missile, Biological, and Chemical Nonproliferation (ISN/MBC)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Missile, Biological, and Chemical Nonproliferation (ISN/MBC):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation;

(2)  Develops and implements policies and programs to impede, roll back, and eliminate the proliferation of chemical and biological weapons (CBW), missile delivery systems for WMD, and related equipment, materials, and technology;

(3)  Leads the development and implementation of, and U.S. participation in, missile, biological, and chemical nonproliferation regimes and arrangements, including the Australia Group (AG); the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR); and the Hague Code of Conduct Against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCOC).  ISN/MBC provides guidance to the U.S. representative to the monthly MTCR meetings in Paris and chairs the interagency Missile Annex Review Committee (MARC) that interprets and reviews proposals for amending the MTCR Annex (control list), and determines the MTCR categorization of missile systems;

(4)  Leads U.S. Government efforts to impede and interdict specific foreign transfers of items to missile, biological, and chemical programs and end-users of concern.  ISN/MBC chairs the interagency Missile Trade Analysis Group (MTAG) missile interdiction and the SHIELD CBW interdiction working groups and works with ISN/CPI on relevant in-transit shipments;

(5)  Implements U.S. missile and CBW sanctions under all relevant laws and Executive Orders, and oversees preparation of the Iran, North Korea, and Syria Nonproliferation Act (INKSNA) report on behalf of the Department.  ISN/MBC duties include initiating cases, seeking intelligence support and interagency advice, preparing the required decision memoranda, and implementing the decisions taken;

(6)  Leads U.S. Government efforts to ensure that proposed U.S. exports do not inadvertently contribute to missile, biological, or chemical proliferation.  Chairs the Missile Technology Export Control (MTEC) missile licensing and the SHIELD CBW licensing working groups, coordinates with EB on Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) licenses, and works with ISN/CATR on overall export control policy issues;

(7)  Reviews, screens, and provides recommendations on visa applications for chemical, biological, and missile proliferation concerns and consistency with U. S. nonproliferation policy.  ISN/MBC serves as the ISN coordinator for the Visas Mantis program; and

(8)  Prepares relevant Congressional reports, including the INKSNA, the annual report on “Proliferation of Missiles and Essential Components of Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Weapons,” as well as the semi-annual report on the national emergency with respect to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

1 FAM 453.4  Biological Policy Staff (ISN/BPS)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-2013)

The Biological Policy Staff (ISN/BPS):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Non-Nuclear and Counter-Proliferation;

(2)  Works to impede and roll back the threat of acquisition or use of biological weapons by state and nonstate actors by:

(a)  Overseeing U.S. implementation of the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), to include chairing backstopping meetings, coordinating the preparation and submission of annual confidence-building measures, and promoting effective implementation of the Convention by other countries;

(b)  Coordinating Department efforts in support of the National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats;

(c)  Developing and promoting measures to prevent misuse of advances in the life sciences, to include participation in U.S. Government and international groups on health security issues; outreach to the scientific community and private industry; and promoting international standards and norms; and

(d)  Developing policies to use nonproliferation tools to impede and prevent bioterrorism; and

(3)  Chairs the U.S. Government Biological Defense Working Group.

1 FAM 454  DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR NUCLEAR AFFAIRS (ISN/NA)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Affairs (ISN/NA):

(1)  Reports to the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation;

(2)  As required, serves as Acting Assistant Secretary in the absence of the Assistant Secretary, performing all functions of that position;

(3)  Advises the Assistant Secretary on the formulation and development of resource requirements for the bureau;

(4)  Supervises the offices of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security (NESS); Multilateral Nuclear and Security Affairs (MNSA); and Regional Affairs (RA).  ISN/NA coordinates the bureau’s work on related issues; provides policy advice to the Assistant Secretary, the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, and other senior U.S. Government officials on these issues; represents the Department in interagency considerations of these matters; and organizes and chairs international negotiations with other governments in these areas;

(5)  Has lead responsibility within the Department of State on general matters pertaining to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and serves as an advisor to the U.S. Representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors and to the U.S. head of delegation to the annual IAEA General Conference.  ISN/NA may represent the United States and the Department of State in other international forums and leads U.S. and international efforts to implement a strengthened IAEA safeguards system;

(6)  Organizes bureau and Department policy in collaboration with the President’s Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation on matters related to the NPT (including the NPT review process);

(7)  Oversees nonproliferation efforts related to the nuclear fuel cycle.  ISN/NA manages Department policy on promoting peaceful nuclear energy cooperation, including cooperation on nuclear energy development and U.S. nuclear and nuclear-related exports and oversees bureau and Department efforts to promote nuclear safety worldwide;

(8)  As required, testifies before Congressional committees; and

(9)  Engages in public diplomacy and outreach to domestic and international audiences to support Administration and Department nonproliferation objectives.

1 FAM 454.1  Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security (ISN/NESS)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-2013)

The Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security (ISN/NESS):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Affairs;

(2)  Develops U.S. policy relating to peaceful nuclear cooperation, nuclear safety, nuclear export controls, and the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities, in furtherance of U.S. nuclear nonproliferation goals, concentrating on technical aspects of nuclear technology and the dangers of nuclear proliferation;

(3)  Consults multilaterally and bilaterally with other nations to advance U.S. interests, including within the relevant portions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).  ISN/NESS coordinates multilateral efforts to improve nuclear nonproliferation export controls, including by leading U.S. Government participation in the NPT Exporters Committee (Zangger Committee), the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), and the NSG’s Dual Use Regime (DUR);

(4)  Analyzes and manages all aspects of peaceful nuclear cooperation including coordinating and negotiating nuclear cooperation agreements, and leads U.S. Government efforts in bilateral dialogues involving Joint Standing Committees on Nuclear Energy Cooperation (JSCNECs) with other countries;

(5)  Coordinates for the Department and has a leading role interagency-wise in developing policy for cooperating with Russia and others on the disposition of excess weapons plutonium, including negotiations on the associated monitoring regime for Russia’s disposition program.  ISN/NESS supports ISN’s Fissile Material Negotiator and Senior Cut-off Coordinator;

(6)  Provides technical advice and recommendations on sensitive fuel-cycle developments, in particular with regard to U.S. policy at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and advises ISN/MNSA and U.S. delegations to the IAEA and other international bodies on nuclear energy issues, including safety and security;

(7)  Leads Department efforts in developing policy on converting highly enriched uranium (HEU)-fueled research reactors to low-enriched uranium (LEU); repatriating fresh and spent HEU fuel; transporting, securing, or minimizing the use of HEU and related materials (e.g., plutonium) in civil applications, including coordinating the international aspects of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program under the Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative;

(8)  Develops and coordinates bilateral and multilateral efforts to secure radioactive sources, including providing technical advice to the IAEA;

(9)  Coordinates and develops U.S. Government nuclear safety and security policies within various forums, including the IAEA and the G-8 Nuclear Safety and Security Group, and oversees U.S. Government technical nuclear safety assistance to European and NIS states.  ISN/NESS leads efforts to implement the 1995 G-7/Ukraine Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Closing Chernobyl; and

(10) Secures entry into force of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage.  ISN/NESS secures entry into force of the Amendment of July 8, 2005, strengthening the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material.

1 FAM 454.2  Office of Multilateral Nuclear and Security Affairs (ISN/MNSA)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-20)

The Office of Multilateral Nuclear and Security Affairs (ISN/MNSA):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Affairs;

(2)  Formulates, coordinates, and implements U.S. policy relating to the global nuclear nonproliferation regime;

(3)  Has lead responsibility for formulating, coordinating, and implementing U.S. policy relating to:

(a)  the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), including the NPT review process; and

(b)  international safeguards and monitoring, as well as for implementing U.S. policy relating to IAEA safeguards in the United States.

(4)  Formulates, coordinates, and implements policy relating to the U.S. Government’s extrabudgetary contribution to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) designated for nuclear safeguards, security, and technical cooperation programs, including the IAEA’s Peaceful Uses Initiative (PUI), as well as for the IAEA’s Board of Governors and General Conference;

(5)  Formulates, coordinates, and leads U.S. bilateral safeguards consultations with other states and the IAEA, and provides policy support for the promotion of safeguards agreements and additional protocols;

(6)  Formulates, coordinates, and implements U.S. policy relating to:

(a)  Fissile material control measures other than the negotiation of a global fissile material cutoff treaty;

(b)  Those aspects of such a treaty that would involve the IAEA and IAEA safeguards; and

(c)  Joint management with the Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance of the augmentation of such a treaty with political measures concerning existing stocks;

(7)  Formulates, coordinates, and implements U.S. policy relating to nuclear-weapon-free-zone treaties and protocols, and nuclear-related security assurances;

(8)  Serves on U.S. delegations to meetings of the IAEA’s Board of Governors and General Conference; the NPT review process; and

(9)  Coordinates ISN's participation in the G7/G8 Nonproliferation Directors Group (NPDG) and in EU nonproliferation dialogues.

1 FAM 454.3  Office of Regional Affairs (ISN/RA)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Regional Affairs (ISN/RA):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Affairs;

(2)  Develops, coordinates, and implements policies to promote the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons and strategic security and stability in the Asia-Pacific region.  ISN/RA develops and promotes confidence building and transparency measures for the region and develops and coordinates strategic and nonproliferation dialogues with China.  This office leads the bureau’s involvement in the Six-Party Talks and other broad diplomatic initiatives towards North Korea;

(3)  Develops, coordinates, and implements policies to promote the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons and strategic security and stability in the Middle East region, including threats posed by Iran and Syria, and encourages confidence building and transparency measures for the region;

(4)  Develops, coordinates, and implements policies to promote the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons and strategic security and stability in the South Asian region, particularly relating to Pakistan and India, and encourages confidence building and transparency measures for the region.  ISN/RA develops and supports strategic dialogues with India and Pakistan;

(5)  Coordinates nonproliferation dialogues with NATO, Russia, and the newly-independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union; and

(6)  Develops, coordinates, and implements policies to promote the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons and strategic security and stability in Sub-Saharan Africa; North, Central, and South America; and other key states or groups of states for which the lead role is not assigned elsewhere within ISN.

1 FAM 455  DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR NONPROLIFERATION PROGRAMS (ISN/NP)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-2013)

The Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Programs (ISN/NP):

(1)  Reports to the Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation;

(2)  As required, serves as Acting Assistant Secretary in the absence of the Assistant Secretary, performing all functions of that position;

(3)  Advises the Assistant Secretary on the formulation and development of resource requirements for the bureau;

(4)  Supervises the offices of Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR), Export Control Cooperation (ECC), Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (NDF), Strategic Communications and Outreach (SCO), and Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism (WMDT).  ISN/NP coordinates the bureau’s work on related issues; provides policy advice to the Assistant Secretary, the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, and other senior U.S. Government officials on these issues; represents the Department in interagency considerations of these matters; and organizes and chairs international negotiations with other governments in these areas;

(5)  As required, testifies before Congressional committees; and

(6)  Engages in public diplomacy and outreach to domestic and international audiences to support Administration and Department nonproliferation objectives.

1 FAM 455.1  Office of Cooperative Threat Reduction (ISN/CTR)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Cooperative Threat Reduction (ISN/CTR):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Programs;

(2)  Develops and implements policies, programs, and strategies to engage cooperatively with countries, institutions, and individuals having access to weapons of mass destruction (WMD)- and missile-relevant items and expertise to prevent acquisition by terrorists, other nonstate actors, and proliferant states worldwide;

(3)  Manages, develops, and implements nonproliferation programs, including providing program allocations under the NADR Global Threat Reduction (GTR) account, for activities to:

(a)  Partner with foreign government stakeholders – including officials in the military, law enforcement, and life science, chemical, and nuclear communities - to enhance capabilities to detect, prevent, and disrupt chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear incidents.

(b)  Improve global biosecurity and biosafety; enhance laboratory capacity for safe, secure surveillance of infectious diseases; and engage biological scientists worldwide;

 (c) Engage chemical scientists, technicians, and engineers in academia and the chemical industry to improve chemical security and safety and prevent terrorists and proliferant states from procuring expertise, materials, and technologies that could enhance a chemical weapons capability or increase the likelihood of a toxic industrial chemical attack;

(d)  Engage nuclear scientists, technicians, and engineers to decrease the risk that a terrorist group could create and use an improvised nuclear device or that proliferant states could acquire needed nuclear expertise; and

(e)  Engage scientists, technicians, and engineers with WMD- and missile-applicable expertise, including through the management of U.S. participation in the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) in Moscow; the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU); and similar organizations;

(4)  Establishes and implements internal controls to ensure that NADR funds are utilized in a programmatically sound, fiscally responsible manner consistent with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and procedures; and

(5)  Leads the process at State for concurrence packages on Secretary of Defense CTR determinations.

1 FAM 455.2  Office of Export Control Cooperation (ISN/ECC)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Export Control Cooperation (ISN/ECC):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Programs (ISN/NP);

(2)  Develops U.S. strategic trade and border-control assistance priorities in order to stem the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and their delivery systems, and prevent illicit and irresponsible transfers of other weapons and related goods and technologies;

(3)  Chairs the Interagency Working Group for Nonproliferation Export and Border Control Assistance.  Reviews, evaluates, and makes policy recommendations on projects that other U.S. Government agencies (including the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, Justice, and Homeland Security) are prepared to undertake to assist foreign governments with improving strategic trade and border-control systems. ;

(4)  Assesses the effectiveness of foreign countries’ national strategic trade control systems;

(5)  Develops, implements, and manages the Export Control and Related Border Security (EXBS) program to assist existing and potential proliferation supply, transit, and transshipment countries with strengthening their strategic trade controls and border security capabilities.  ISN/ECC develops the global portion of the Export Control and Related Border Security (EXBS) NADR budget request; and collaborates with appropriate posts, bureaus, and offices to develop bilateral and regional portions of the NADR-EXBS budget request.  ISN/ECC plans for, executes, and oversees expenditure of all NADR-EXBS funds and establishes and implements internal controls to ensure that EXBS funds are utilized in a programmatically sound, fiscally responsible manner consistent with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and procedures.  ISN/ECC advises appropriate Department principals on EXBS matters and prepares required documentation and correspondence, such as notifications to Congress, with respect to NADR-EXBS funds;

(6)  Oversees and manages EXBS training activities in, and equipment donations to, EXBS partner countries; leads delegations to foreign countries and multilateral conferences to initiate and oversee strategic trade-control assistance programs; and coordinates program activities with EXBS advisers stationed at U.S. embassies in partner countries; and

(7)  Coordinates strategic trade control and border security assistance to EXBS partner countries with other international donors.

1 FAM 455.3  Office of Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (ISN/NDF)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (ISN/NDF):

(1)  Reports to the Assistant Secretary of State for International Security and Nonproliferation under the day-to-day policy guidance of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Programs;

(2)  Advises the Chairman and Members of the Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (NDF) Review Panel and the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security on the most effective use of NDF assets to accomplish U.S. Government nonproliferation and disarmament objectives;

(3)  Works closely within ISN and with other relevant bureaus and U.S. Government agencies to develop and evaluate proposals to use NDF funds to accomplish U.S. Government nonproliferation and disarmament policies;

(4)  Executes NDF projects approved by the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security and notified to Congress;

(5)  Negotiates with foreign governments, foreign contractors, U.S. Government agencies, and U.S. private contractors, to implement NDF proposals; secure permission to execute NDF projects; and promote appropriate burden sharing;

(6)  Works closely with the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services (CGFS), the Director for Foreign Assistance (F), the Deputy Secretary for Management and Resources, OMB, and Congress to secure ongoing funding for NDF activities and manages the Congressional appropriation for the NDF, to include allotments, suballotments, transfers, obligating, de-obligating, or reprogramming NDF funds; and

(7)  Establishes and implements internal controls to ensure that NDF funds are utilized in a programmatically sound, fiscally responsible manner consistent with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and procedures.  ISN/NDF provides travel management for NDF staff, processes and monitors NDF expenditures, invoices, payments, grants, contracts, Memoranda of Understanding, Memoranda of Agreement, Memoranda of Discussions, interagency money transfers, Interagency Acquisition Agreements, program recommendations, decisions, and Congressional notifications and inquiries, and briefs Congress on the use of NDF funds and on the results of projects undertaken by the NDF.

1 FAM 455.4  Office of Strategic Communications and Outreach (ISN/SCO)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Strategic Communications and Outreach (ISN/SCO):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Programs;

(2)  Develops, plans, coordinates, and executes a broad range of outreach efforts, both foreign (public diplomacy) and domestic (public affairs), in support of Department and U.S. Government international security and nonproliferation priorities.  Potential audiences include but are not limited to key foreign groups and opinion leaders, NGOs, academia, youth audiences, and the general public;

(3)  Responds to direct media inquiries, coordinating with the Bureau of Public Affairs and serving as the single point of contact for ISN interaction with foreign and domestic press.  ISN/SCO coordinates the timely preparation and dissemination of daily press guidance for ISN, working closely with the Bureau of Public Affairs and press officers throughout the Department;

(4)  Maintains and facilitates broad clearance of a wide range of current ISN talking points for use by ISN principals and other Department officials.  ISN/SCO monitors online media activity and maintains the bureau’s online, electronic information sites;

(5)  Develops and ensures effective implementation of the bureau’s legislative agenda, and serves as the bureau’s liaison with the Bureau of Legislative Affairs (H) and with Congressional staffs; and

(6)  Serves as the bureau’s GAO liaison to the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services (CGFS), ensuring adequate and appropriate representation of ISN equities; facilitating GAO requests for meetings and information; and providing feedback and follow-up to GAO as reports are drafted and released.

1 FAM 455.5  Office of Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism (ISN/WMDT)

(CT:ORG-350;   10-31-2014)

The Office of Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism (ISN/WMDT):

(1)  Reports to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nonproliferation Programs;

(2)  Develops policy and plans; directs initiatives; and coordinates partner capacity-building activities to detect, prevent, protect against, and respond to the illicit trafficking of nuclear or radiological material and to the threat or use of nuclear or radiological weapons by terrorists;

(3)  Leads implementation of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT), represents the U.S. GICNT Co-Chair, and oversees management of content posted on the GICNT's Global Initiative Information Portal (GIIP);

(4)  Develops U. S. Government policies to address the threat of nuclear smuggling and leads efforts to combat illicit trafficking in nuclear or highly radioactive materials through diplomatic engagement via the Nuclear Smuggling Outreach Initiative (NSOI); assistance via the Preventing Nuclear Smuggling Program; leading dialogues relating to Counter Nuclear Smuggling (CNS) teams; and chairing the Nuclear Trafficking Response Group established under Presidential directive to coordinate U. S. Government nonproliferation, law enforcement, and, in coordination with INR,  intelligence responses to smuggling of nuclear and radioactive material abroad;

(5)  Chairs the Forensics Engagement Working Group (FEWG), which coordinates U.S. government engagement with foreign partners on nuclear forensics;

(6)  Coordinates U. S. Government support to foreign governments in preparing for and responding to the consequences of incidents occurring abroad that involve the use of chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) contaminants;

(7)  Oversees Department activity related to the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (GNDA) framework and with the Departments of Energy and Defense, leads U.S. Government activity on the exterior layer of the GNDA;

(8)  Establishes and implements internal controls to ensure that Non-Proliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs (NADR) funds are utilized in a programmatically sound, fiscally responsible manner consistent with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and procedures;

(9)  Maintains the ISN Bureau Emergency Action Plan and manages mission-critical team activities, as needed; and

(10)Coordinates all Department activity supporting the implementation of NSPD-28, “U.S Nuclear Weapons Command and Control Safety and Security”

1 FAM 456  through 459  unassigned


1 FAM EXHIBIT 451.2  
BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND NONPROLIFERATION (ISN)

(CT:ORG-297;   01-23-2013)