UNCLASSIFIED (U)

9 FAM 302.11 

(U) Ineligibility based on Previous removal and unlawful presence in the united States - INA 212(a)(9)  

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)
(Office of Origin:  CA/VO)

9 FAM 302.11-1  (U) Statutory and Regulatory Authority

9 FAM 302.11-1(A)  (U) Immigration and Nationality Act

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

(U) INA 101(g) (8 U.S.C. 1101(g)); INA 212(a)(9)(A) (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(9)(A)); INA 212(a)(9)(B) (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(9)(B)); INA 212(a)(9)(C) (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(9)(C)); INA 212(d)(3) (8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(3)); INA 235 (8 U.S.C. 1225).

9 FAM 302.11-1(B)  (U) Code of Federal Regulations

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

(U) 8 CFR 212.7(e); 22 CFR 40.93.

9 FAM 302.11-2  (U) Individuals Previously Removed - INA 212(a)(9)(A)

9 FAM 302.11-2(A)  (U) Grounds

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) makes inadmissible, and therefore ineligible for a visa, any individual who has been ordered removed  under INA 235(b)(1) or INA 240 as an arriving traveler, and who seeks admission within 5 years (or 20 years if second or subsequent removal or at any time if convicted of an aggravated felony) of the date of such removal, unless prior permission has been granted (see 9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(5))

b. (U) INA 212(a)(9)(A)(ii) makes inadmissible, and therefore ineligible for a visa, anyone who has been ordered removed from the U.S. or departed while an order of removal was outstanding and who seeks admission within 10 years (or within 20 years if it is after a second or subsequent removal or at any time if the individual is convicted of an aggravated felony) from the date of such departure or removal, unless prior permission has been granted (see 9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(5)).

9 FAM 302.11-2(B)  (U) Application

9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(1)  (U) Five-Year Bar

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) An individual who has been found to be inadmissible upon arrival, whether as a result of a summary determination of inadmissibility by an immigration officer at the port of entry under INA 235(b)(1) – (“Expedited Removal”) or as a result of a finding of inadmissibility by an Immigration Judge during a hearing in Immigration Court under INA 240 (“Removal Proceedings”) that DHS initiated upon their arrival in the United States, is inadmissible under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) unless they have remained outside of the United States for five consecutive years since the date of deportation or removal.  Under INA 101(g), someone who departs the United States while a final removal order is in effect is deemed to have been removed, even if the alien leaves on his or her own.

9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(2)  (U) Ten-Year Bar

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

(U) An individual who has been removed from the United States under any provision of law, or who departed while an order of removal was in effect, is ineligible under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(ii) unless the individual has remained outside of the United States for 10 consecutive years since the date of removal or departure.

9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(3)  (U) Twenty Year Bar

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) An  who has been removed from the United States two or more times is ineligible under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) or INA 212(a)(9)(A)(ii), as appropriate, unless they have remained outside of the United States for 20 consecutive years since the date of such removal or departure while a removal order was outstanding.

9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(4)  (U) Permanent Bar

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) An individual who has been removed and has also been convicted of an aggravated felony is permanently ineligible for a visa under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) or 212(a)(9)(A)(ii), as appropriate.  "Aggravated felony" is defined in INA 101(a)(43) (see 9 FAM 102.3-1)).  For purposes of this permanent bar, it does not matter whether the individual was convicted of an aggravated felony in the United States or elsewhere.  It also does not matter whether the conviction itself resulted in the removal of the individual, or whether the individual was convicted prior to or after removal.

9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(5)  (U) Permission to Reapply or Consent to Reapply (CTR)

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) An individual is not ineligible under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) or (ii) if the Secretary of Homeland Security has consented to the individual reapplying for admission.  The individual must file Form I-212 (Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal) to obtain "Consent to Reapply" (CTR) before he/she can lawfully return to the United States.  "Consent to Reapply" is also called "permission to reapply."  If the Secretary of Homeland Security consents, then the ineligibility no longer applies.  Although the consent to reapply removes the ground of ineligibility, it does not remove the factual circumstances which led to the original finding of ineligibility, nor does it affect any other ground of ineligibility.

b. (U) NIV Applicants:

(1)  (U) DHS will consider CTR to have been granted for ineligibility under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) or (ii) with the approval of a consent to reapply through the Admissibility Review Information Service (ARIS) via an “ARIS Waiver Request Form”.  You may favorably recommend an NIV applicant ineligible under INA 212(a)(9)(A)(i) or (ii) at any time within the applicability period of the 5, 10, 20 year, or permanent bar.  Therefore, when posts are recommending a waiver through ARIS for NIV applicants, the applicant should not file an I-212.

(2)  (U) When submitting the ARIS request for a 9A ineligibility, post must clearly state, “Post recommends consent to reapply” and provide the reason for recommending in the written comments of the ARIS request.

9 FAM 302.11-2(C)  (U) Advisory Opinions

(CT:VISA-1150;   09-14-2020)

(U) An AO is not required for a potential INA 212(a)(9)(A) ineligibility; however, if you have a question about the interpretation or application of law or regulation, you may request an AO from L/CA.

9 FAM 302.11-2(D)  (U) Reserved

(CT:VISA-347;   04-18-2017)

9 FAM 302.11-2(E)  Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-2(E)(1)  Unavailable

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

a. Unavailable

b. Unavailable

c.  Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-2(E)(2)  Unavailable

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

a. Unavailable

b. Unavailable

c.  Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-3  (U) Individuals Unlawfully Present - INA 212(a)(9)(B)

9 FAM 302.11-3(A)  (U) Grounds

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021) 

(U) INA 212(a)(9)(B) makes ineligible, and therefore ineligible for a visa individuals who have, since April 1, 1997, been “unlawfully present” in the United States for more than 180 days.

9 FAM 302.11-3(B)  (U) Application

9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(1)  (U) Interpretation of “Unlawful Presence”

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) INA 212(a)(9)(B)(ii) states that "unlawful presence" occurs when  “… the individual is present in the United States after the expiration of the period of stay authorized by the [Secretary of Homeland Security] or is present in the United States without being admitted or paroled."  Under this construction, an individual generally would be unlawfully present if he or she entered the United States without inspection, stayed beyond the date specified on the Form I-94, Arrival and Departure Record, or was found by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), an immigration judge (IJ), or the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) to have violated status.  However, even individuals fitting into one of these categories may be deemed to be in a period of authorized stay in certain circumstances, as noted below.

b. (U) DHS has interpreted "period of stay authorized by the Secretary of Homeland Security," as used in this context, to include:

(1)  (U) For individuals inspected and admitted or paroled until a date specified on the Form I-94 or any extension, any period of presence in the United States up until either:

(a)  (U) the expiration of the Form I-94 (or any extension); or

(b)  (U) a formal finding of a status violation made by DHS, an IJ, or the BIA in the context of an application for any immigration benefit or in removal proceedings, whichever comes first.

(2)  (U) For individuals inspected and admitted for "duration of status" (DOS), any period of presence in the United States, unless DHS, an IJ, or the BIA makes a formal finding of a status violation, in which case unlawful presence will only being to accrue the day after the formal finding is made;

(3)  (U) For individuals granted "voluntary departure" (VD), pursuant to INA 240B, the period between the granting of VD and the date of their departure, if the individual departs according to the terms of the grant of VD;

(4)  (U) For individuals who have applied for extension of stay or change of nonimmigrant classification and who have remained in the United States after expiration of the I-94 while awaiting DHS's decision, the entire period of the pendency of the application, provided that:

(a) (U) the individual does not work unlawfully while the application is pending and did not work unlawfully prior to filing the application; and

(b)  (U) the individual did not otherwise fail to maintain his or her status prior to the filing of the application (unless the application is approved at the discretion of USCIS and the failure to maintain status is solely a result of the expiration of the Form I-94), and further provided either:

(i)     (U) that the application was subsequently approved; or

(ii)    (U) if the application was denied or the individual departed while the application was still pending, that the application was timely filed and nonfrivolous.

(5) (U) For individuals who have properly filed an application for adjustment of status to LPR, the entire processing period of the application, even if the application is subsequently denied or abandoned, provided the individual (unless seeking to adjust status under NACARA or HRIFA) did not file for adjustment "defensively" (i.e., after deportation proceedings had already been initiated);  

(6)  (U) For individuals covered by Temporary Protected Status (TPS), the period after TPS went into effect and prior to its expiration; and

(7)  (U) For individuals granted deferred action, the period during which deferred action is authorized.

c.  (U) Unauthorized presence accrued prior to the filing of an application for adjustment of status, the granting of voluntary departure, or the filing date of a TPS an application with prima facie of eligibility was filed (if the application is approved) is not "cured" by the subsequent period of authorized stay that result from the approval of these applications.  Additional unauthorized presence will resume accruing after these authorized periods lapse.

d. (U) For persons who have been admitted for duration of status (DOS) (as is usually the case with individuals in A, G, F, J, and I visa status), unlawful presence will not accrue unless DHS, IJ, or the BIA finds a status violation in the context of a request for an immigration benefit or during removal proceedings.  This finding of status violation by the DHS, an IJ, or the BIA will cause a period of "unlawful presence" to begin.  In DOS cases where DHS or an IJ or the BIA makes a formal status violation finding, the individual begins accruing unlawful presence on the day after the finding (i.e., the date the finding was published /communicated).  For example, if an applicant presents a letter from DHS dated December 1, 2008, that says the applicant was out of status starting on May 28, 2001, the applicant began to accrue unlawful presence as of December 2, 2008, not May 28, 2001.

e. (U) A finding of a status violation by DHS, an IJ, or the BIA is not required in the case of an illegal entrant or an individual who admitted to a date certain overstays the specified period of stay indicated on their Form I-94.  If you find that an individual entered without inspection and admission or stayed beyond the date on the Form I-94, and remained in the United States more than 180 days after entering without admission or after the expiration of his or her Form I-94, a determination of ineligibility under INA 212(a)(9)(B) would be warranted (unless some exception to INA 212(a)(9)(B) applies in the particular case).

f.  (U) When calculating unlawful presence, the actual date that the Form I-94 (or any extension) expires is considered authorized and is not counted.  In addition, the date of departure from the United States is not counted as unlawful presence. 

9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(2)  (U) Time Frames

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) In General:  

(1)  (U) INA 212(a)(9)(B) went into effect on April 1, 1997, and the statute is not retroactive.  Periods prior to April 1, 1997, therefore, cannot be considered when calculating the period of unlawful presence accrued for purposes of 212(a)(9)(B).

(2)  (U) Neither of the INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) (180+ days but less than a year) or INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II) (one year+) time frames is cumulative across trips.  The unlawful presence must occur in the same trip to the United States, and periods of unlawful presence accrued on separate trips cannot be added together.  However, separate periods of unlawful presence occurring during the same overall period of stay (e.g., unlawful presence before and after a period of voluntary departure) should be added together to calculate total unlawful presence during a particular stay.

(3)  (U) Both provisions are triggered by departure from the United States, and the bar against reentry applies from the date of departure. 

b. (U) INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) Departure Prior to Commenced Proceedings Required:  The three-year bar of INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) applies only to individuals who left the United States voluntarily before the DHS commenced proceedings against them.  If the individual was unlawfully present for a period of more than 180 days but less than a year and was placed in proceedings before the individual's departure but those proceedings concluded without a removal, the individual would not be ineligible under the three-year bar of INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I). 

c.  (U) INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II) Departure at Any Time:   The 10-year bar under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II) does not contain the same language as the three-year bar under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) relating to the individual having departed voluntarily prior to commencement of removal proceedings.  Thus, an individual who departs the United States after having been unlawfully present for a period of one year or more after April 1, 1997, is barred from returning to the United States for 10 years, whether the departure was before, during, or after removal proceedings and regardless of whether the individual departed on his or her own initiative or under removal order. 

d. (U) Departure Pursuant to a Grant of Advance Parole:  An alien who has left and returned to the United States under a grant of advance parole has not made a “departure . . . from the United States” within the meaning of INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i).  See Matter of Arrabally and Yerrabelly, 25 I&N Dec. 771 (BIA 2012).  Note that this does not preclude a trip under a grant of advance parole from being considered a “departure” for any other purposes under the INA, nor does it call into question the applicability of any other ineligibility ground.  On the contrary, it is well settled that an individual who leaves the United States and returns under a grant of advance parole is subject to those grounds of ineligibility that may apply, rather than grounds of deportability once parole is terminated. 

9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(3)  (U) Asylee Exception

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) In General:  INA 212(a)(9)(B)(iii)(II) provides that no period in which an individual has a bona fide application for asylum pending should be considered when calculating the period of unlawful presence, unless during such period the individual was employed in the United States without authorization.   DHS has determined that an application for asylum that has an arguable basis in law or fact, and is not frivolous, whether or not approvable, is a bona fide application for purposes of the exception set forth in INA 212(a)(9)(B)(iii).  The decision regarding whether an asylum claim is frivolous is made by an Immigration Judge or the Board of Immigration.  (See 8 CFR 208.20.)

b. (U) Confirming Bona Fide Application for Asylum: 

(1)  (U) If a visa applicant who would otherwise be ineligible for a visa under INA 212(a)(9)(B) claims the benefit of the bona fide asylum exception, you should first determine whether the applicant engaged in unauthorized employment while the asylum claim was pending, and if any part of such employment occurred on or after April 1, 1997.  (See paragraph c below.)  If so, the applicant would not be eligible for the bona fide asylum exception, and they should be refused under INA 212(a)(9)(B).  If the applicant did not engage in authorized employment, it will then be necessary to determine whether DHS determines the asylum claim was not “bona fide.” 

(2)  Unavailable

(a)  (U) The applicant's complete name, date of birth, and "A" number;

(b)  (U) When and where the applicant lived in the United States;

(c)  (U) When and where the applicant filed the asylum application;

(d)  (U) Whether the applicant worked in the United States;

(e)  (U) If the applicant worked in the United States, whether DHS had authorized such employment and, if so, what type of authorization documents the applicant had been given;

(3)  (U) You may presume the application to have been bona fide if the post receives no report from the "HQDHS for Asylum Office" within 60 days from the date of the referral.

c.  (U) Work Without Authorization After April 1, 1997, Bars Use of Asylee Exception: 

(1)  (U) Under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(iii)(II), an individual is entitled to the exception for bona fide asylum applicants only if the individual has not worked without authorization while such application is/was pending.  Because INA 212(a)(9)(B) only went into effect on April 1, 1997, however unauthorized employment prior to that date should not count against the individual.  Therefore, only unauthorized employment occurring on or after April 1, 1997, will disqualify the individual from being eligible for the bona fide asylum exception in INA 212(a)(9)(B)(iii)(II).

(2)  (U) Prior to seeking the DHS confirmation that the asylum application was bona fide, you should interview the applicant with particular attention to questions relating to possible unauthorized employment by the individual.  If the individual has engaged in unauthorized employment during the pendency of the asylum application, and if any portion of the unauthorized employment occurred on or after April 1, 1997, then the individual would be ineligible for the exception and no purpose would be served in submitting the case to DHS for a determination of whether the asylum claim was bona fide.

(3)  (U) You should note that individuals who apply for asylum may be able to obtain work authorization from DHS if their application is pending for more than 180 days even if they are not in a status that would normally allow employment.  In such cases, the individual will receive an “employment authorization document” (EAD) from DHS.  Posts should, therefore, examine the facts carefully when determining whether a particular employment was not authorized. 

9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(4)  (U) Other Exceptions

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) Minors:  Any period that an individual spends unlawfully in the United States while under the age of 18 does not count toward calculating the accrual of unlawful presence for purposes of INA 212(a)(9)(B). 

b. (U) Family Unity:  Any period in which an individual is the beneficiary of the family unity protection of Section 301 of the Immigration Act of 1990 (IMMACT 90) would not count toward calculating the accrual of unlawful presence for purposes of INA 212(a)(9)(B).  Individual beneficiaries of such protection must maintain their status by regularly applying to re-register. 

c.  (U) Battered Spouses and Children:  Battered spouses and children benefitting under INA 204(a)(1)(A)(iii)(I) and INA 212(a)(6)(A)(ii) for immigrant visas may not accrue unlawful presence if there is a substantial connection between the battering or cruelty and the violation of the terms of the individual’s nonimmigrant visa.  In this context, the abuse must have started before and led to the individual's accrual of unlawful presence.  This requires, at a minimum, establishing the dates of arrival and termination of the authorized stay, as well as the timing of the abuse and its relationship to the continued stay beyond that date. 

d. (U) Victims of Severe Form of Trafficking in Persons:  INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i) will not apply to an individual who demonstrates that a severe form of trafficking (as that term is defined in 22 U.S.C. 7102) was at least one central reason for the individual’s unlawful presence in the United States. 

9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(5)  (U) “Tolling” for Good Cause

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) “Tolling” is a legal doctrine which allows for the pausing or delaying of the running of the period set forth by a statute of limitations.  Subparagraph (iv) of INA 212(a)(9)(B) provides for "tolling" for up to 120 days of a possible period of unlawful presence during the pendency of an application to change or extend NIV status.  This subparagraph applies only to possible ineligibility under subsection INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I).  The tolling is only permitted if the individual is lawfully admitted to or paroled into the United States, has filed a nonfrivolous application for a change or extension of status prior to the date of expiration of the authorized period of stay, and has not been employed without authorization in the United States before or during the pendency of such application, but not to exceed 120 days.

b. (U) DHS has inferred that the "120 days" limitation was predicated on an assumption that they would be able to adjudicate applications for change or extensions of status within that time frame.  Due to DHS backlogs, however, some cases have been pending as long as six months or more, during which the applicants could incur the three or 10-year penalties through no fault of their own if only the first 120 days were tolled and the application was ultimately denied.  Therefore, for all cases involving potential ineligibility under INA 212(a)(9)(B) whether under the three-year bar of 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) or the 10-year bar of INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II), DHS has decided to consider all time during which an application for extension of stay (EOS) or change of nonimmigrant status (COS) is pending to be a period of stay authorized by the Secretary of Homeland Security provided:

(1)  (U) The application was filed in a timely manner; i.e., before the expiration date of the Form I-94, Arrival and Departure Record;

(2)  (U) The application was "nonfrivolous"; and

(3)  (U) The individual has not engaged in unauthorized employment (whether before or after April 1, 1997).

(4)  (U) Although INA 212(a)(9)(B) did not go into effect until April 1, 1997, and the law is not retroactive, unauthorized employment prior to April 1, 1997, will render an individual ineligible for the nonfrivolous COS and/or EOS exception because individuals who have engaged in unauthorized employment are generally not eligible for change or extension of nonimmigrant stay, and therefore, an application under such circumstances should generally be considered frivolous.

c.  (U) To be considered "nonfrivolous" you find that the application had an arguable basis in law and fact and must not have been filed for an improper purpose (e.g., as a groundless excuse for the applicant to remain in activities incompatible with his or her status).  It is not necessary to determine that the DHS would have approved the application for it to be considered nonfrivolous.

9 FAM 302.11-3(C)  (U) Advisory Opinions (AO)

(CT:VISA-1150;   09-14-2020)

(U) An AO is not required for a potential INA 212(a)(9)(B) ineligibility; however, if you have a question about the interpretation or application of law or regulation, you may request an AO from L/CA.

9 FAM 302.11-3(D)  (U) Waiver

9 FAM 302.11-3(D)(1)  (U) Waivers for Immigrants

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) In General: An applicant for an IV who is ineligible under INA 212(a)(9)(B) may seek a waiver from DHS under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(v) if the applicant is the spouse, son, or daughter of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident and DHS is satisfied that denying the applicant admission to the United States would result in extreme hardship to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident spouse or parent of the applicant.

b. (U) I-601-A Provisional Waiver of Unlawful Presence:

(1) (U) In General: Any IV applicant who is ineligible solely under INA 212(a)(9)(B) may apply for a provisional unlawful presence waiver (provisional waiver) of this ineligibility prior to leaving the United States for their immigrant visa interview.  Applicants seeking a provisional waiver must file a Form I-601-A provisional unlawful presence waiver application with USCIS.  On August 29, 2016, USCIS expanded the provisional unlawful presence waiver process to all IV categories with a qualifying relationship to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident.  If you identify any other ground(s) of ineligibility during the immigrant visa interview, the approved Form I-601-A is no longer valid.

(2)  (U) Eligibility:

(a)  (U) An applicant may be eligible to apply for a Form I-601-A provisional unlawful presence waiver with USCIS, if they meet the following criteria:

(i)     (U) Is physically present in the United States at the time of filing and appears for biometrics collection at a USCIS Application Support Center;

(ii)    (U) Is at least 17 years of age at the time of filing;

(iii)    (U) Is the beneficiary of an approved Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative, Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker or a Diversity Visa Program selectee. [Please note that fiancé(e) beneficiaries are ineligible to file Form I-601-A];

(iv)   (U) Has a case pending with the Department of State based on:

ˇ         (U) An approved immigrant visa petition, for which the Department of State IV processing fee has been paid;

ˇ         (U) Selection by the Department of State to participate in the Diversity Visa (DV) Program under INA 203(c) for the fiscal year for which the applicant is registered; or

ˇ         (U) Eligibility as a derivative beneficiary under INA 203(d) of an approved immigrant visa petition or of an individual selected to participate in the DV Program or other appropriate evidence.

(v)    (U) Is, or will be at the time of the IV interview, ineligible for an immigrant visa based solely on unlawful presence in the United States under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) or INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II);

(vi)   (U) Will depart from the United States to obtain the immigrant visa;

(vii)   (U) Has a U.S. citizen or LPR spouse or parent who would experience extreme hardship if DHS refused to admit the IV applicant to the United States and otherwise merit favorable exercise of discretion for a provisional waiver in accordance with INA 212(a)(9)(B)(v); and

(viii)  (U) Meets all other requirements for the provisional unlawful presence waiver as stated in 8 CFR 212.7(e), and the Form I-601-A and its instructions.

(b)  (U) An applicant is ineligible for a provisional unlawful presence waiver if they are otherwise ineligible in accordance with 8 CFR 212.7(e), or the Form I-601-A and its instructions.

(3)  (U) USCIS Processing and NVC Scheduling:

(a)  (U) Those intending to apply for the provisional unlawful presence waiver must submit the Form I-601-A directly to USCIS, which will use the Consular Consolidated Database (CCD) to confirm that a petition was filed or that an applicant is a selectee under the DV Program. 

(b)  (U) After a case file has been transferred to a consular section from NVC, it is no longer possible to submit an IV processing fee payment through CEAC.  Consequently, the IV applicant will be unable to submit a Form I-601A application because proof of an IV processing fee payment is required.  Individuals applying for a Form I-601A who are still residing in the United States may have a third party submit an IV processing fee on their behalf.  Consular cashiers (or the relevant GSS contractors) may process the fee and provide the third party a receipt with the IV case number, the applicant’s full name, and "A" number (if one exists) written on the receipt by consular staff.  This will allow the USCIS lockbox to associate the Form I-601A application with the correct IV fee receipt.   

(c)  (U) Upon receipt of an I-601-A application, USCIS will notify the NVC, or the Kentucky Consular Center (KCC) if related to a DV case, that an applicant has applied for an I-601-A provisional unlawful presence waiver.  NVC will notify the applicant that it will not schedule the case for an IV appointment until USCIS notifies NVC of its adjudication decision.  Once USCIS notifies the applicant and NVC of its decision on the I-601-A application, NVC will schedule the case of any documentarily qualified applicant for an IV appointment, notify the applicant of the appointment date, and forward the case to post for processing.  In the IV case file sent to post, NVC will include a post supplement report with information confirming whether USCIS processed an I-601-A for the applicant and whether USCIS approved or denied the provisional unlawful presence waiver.  IV case files will not include a stand-alone I-601-A approval or denial document.  NVC will also record the USCIS decision as a case note for consular officers to see in the CCD’s IVIS Beneficiary Report or PIVOT Case Summary report and posts may use the USCIS receipt number to verify the I-601-A decision in CLAIMS via the DHS Person Centric Query System (PCQS) under Other Agencies/Bureaus in CCD. USCIS will notify KCC of any I-601-A decision associated with a DV application.  KCC will, in turn, contact the appropriate consular section. 

(d)  (U) Follow-to-Join Applicants:  To qualify for an I-601-A waiver, an applicant must demonstrate an extreme hardship to a U.S. citizen or LPR spouse or parent would result if the U.S. government refused to admit the applicant to the United States. For this reason, a derivative spouse may only to be able to demonstrate a qualifying extreme hardship after the principal applicant obtains LPR status.  FTJ applicants are instructed to appear with a USCIS approval notice.  You will then verify I-601-A approval through PCQS.

(4)  Unavailable

(5)  (U) Revocation of Approved I-601-A:

(a)  (U) The approved provisional unlawful presence waiver is revoked automatically if:

(i)     (U) You determine that the applicant is ineligible to receive an IV under any section of law other than INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(I) or INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II); or

(ii)    (U) The immigrant visa petition approval associated with the provisional unlawful presence waiver is at any time revoked, withdrawn, or rendered invalid and not otherwise reinstated for humanitarian reasons or converted to a widow or widower petition; or

(iii)    (U) The immigrant visa registration is terminated and has not been reinstated in accordance with INA 203(g); or

(iv)   (U) The applicant, at any time after filing but before approval of the provisional unlawful presence waiver takes effect enters or attempts to reenter the United States without being inspected and admitted or paroled.

(b)  Unavailable 

(c)  (U) Posts with a question regarding a specific I-601-A decision should contact NVC (or KCC if it is a DV case), which will liaise with USCIS.  Only USCIS, however, has authority to adjudicate the I-601-A provisional unlawful presence waiver application and determine whether the grounds for extreme hardship submitted as justification for I-601-A approval merit favorable exercise of discretion by USCIS.

(6)  (U) Processing Applicants with Approved I-601-A:

(a)  Unavailable

(i)     Unavailable

(ii)    Unavailable   

(iii)    Unavailable

(b)  Unavailable

(7)  (U) Processing Applicants with Denied I-601-A: Those applicants denied an I-601-A may not appeal the USCIS decision, but may file a new I-601-A.  If the applicant chooses not to submit a new I-601-A to USCIS, the applicant must leave the United States to appear for his or her IV interview and submit a Form I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility, to USCIS after a consular officer has found the applicant ineligible for a visa under INA 212(a) or any other section of law. 

9 FAM 302.11-3(D)(2)  (U) Waivers for Nonimmigrants

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) Nonimmigrants who are ineligible under INA 212(a)(9)(B) may apply for an INA 212(d)(3)(A) waiver through the Admissibility Review Information Service (ARIS) via an “ARIS Waiver Request Form”.  (See 9 FAM 305.4.)

9 FAM 302.11-3(E)  Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-3(E)(1)  Unavailable

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

a. Unavailable

b. Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-3(E)(2)  Unavailable

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

Unavailable

Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-4  (U) Individuals Unlawfully Present After Previous Immigration Violation - INA 212(a)(9)(c)

9 FAM 302.11-4(A)  (U) Grounds

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) Under INA 212(a)(9)(C), any individual who:

(1)  (U) Has been unlawfully present in the U.S. for an aggregate period of more than one year, or

(2)  (U) Has been ordered removed under section 235(b)(1), or other provision of law and who enters or attempts to reenter the United States without being admitted or attempts to enter without inspection is ineligible

9 FAM 302.11-4(B)  (U) Application

9 FAM 302.11-4(B)(1)  (U) In General

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) This provision applies to individuals who, having previously been unlawfully present for more than a year or having been previously removed, subsequently enter, or try to enter the United States without being admitted.  See 9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(1) above for the interpretation of unlawful presence, although the exceptions for 9B at 9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(3) through 9 FAM 302.11-3(B)(5) above do not apply to 9C.  You should note that the aggregate year of illegal presence must have occurred after April 1, 1997 to support a 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(I) or 9C1 finding.  A prior removal, however, may have occurred at any time to support a 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(II) or 9C2 finding.  The triggering event for both—the entry or attempted entry into the United States without admission, must have occurred after April 1, 1997. 

b. (U) An “admission” in this context is preceded by an inspection by CBP.  Therefore, an individual who has either an aggregate year of illegal presence or a prior removal may trigger a 212(a)(9)(C)(i) ineligibility by making a false claim to U.S. citizenship at a Port of Entry (POE).  U.S. citizens are not subject to inspection and admission at POEs, therefore, the attempted entry via a false claim to citizenship has the same effect as an attempted entry without inspection outside of a POE.

9 FAM 302.11-4(B)(2)  (U) Effect of INA 212(a)(9)(C) Ineligibility

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) An individual subject to INA 212(a)(9)(C) is permanently ineligible and ineligible for a visa.  Such an individual may, however, seek permission to reapply or consent to reapply.  See 9 FAM 302.11-2(B)(5) above.

9 FAM 302.11-4(C)  (U) Advisory Opinions

(CT:VISA-1150;   09-14-2020) 

(U) An AO is not required for a potential INA 212(a)(9)(C) ineligibility; however, if you have a question about the interpretation or application of law or regulation, you may request an AO from L/CA.

9 FAM 302.11-4(D)  (U) Waiver

9 FAM 302.11-4(D)(1)  (U) Waivers for Immigrants

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

(U) An individual subject to INA 212(a)(9)(C) is permanently ineligible for a visa.  Such an individual may, however, after ten years seek the Secretary of Homeland Security's consent to reapply (CTR, also sometimes referred to as “permission to reapply”) which the individual can obtain through DHS by submitting Form 1-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal.  If the Secretary of Homeland Security consents, then the ineligibility no longer applies.  Although the consent to reapply removes the ground of ineligibility, it does not remove the factual circumstances which led to the original finding of ineligibility, nor does it affect any other ground of ineligibility.

9 FAM 302.11-4(D)(2)  (U) Waivers for Nonimmigrants

(CT:VISA-1345;   08-20-2021)

a. (U) For NIV applicants with a 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(I) or 9C1 ineligibility, you make seek temporary relief on behalf of the applicant by submitting an “ARIS Waiver Request Form” through the Admissibility Review Information Service (ARIS).  You may recommend an NIV applicant ineligible under 9C1 for temporary relief at any time. 

b. (U) If 9C1 is the applicant’s only ineligibility and more than ten years have passed since their  last departure, they may choose to apply for relief by filing form I-212 with DHS to obtain permanent relief, which, if granted, allows for issuance of a full validity visa.

c.  (U) NIV applicants with a 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(II) or 9C2 ineligibility, a visa applicant may apply for a waiver of ineligibility only after the ten-year bar has passed.  The applicant may apply for a waiver only by a filing form I-212 with DHS.  ARIS is not used for this waiver.  If the waiver is granted, it provides permanent relief which allows for issuance of a full validity visa.

9 FAM 302.11-4(E)  Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-4(E)(1)  Unavailable

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

Unavailable

9 FAM 302.11-4(E)(2)  Unavailable

(CT:VISA-272;   12-20-2016)

Unavailable

 

 

UNCLASSIFIED (U)