UNCLASSIFIED (U)

1 FAM 040 

THE UNDER SECRETARIES OF STATE

(CT:ORG-589;   09-30-2021)
(Office of Origin:  S/ES-EX)

1 FAM 041  UNDER SECRETARY FOR POLITICAL AFFAIRS (P)

1 FAM 041.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-323;   12-05-2013)

The Under Secretary for Political Affairs (P):

(1)  Reports directly to the Secretary of State (S);

(2)  In the absence of the Secretary and Deputy Secretaries, serves as Secretary of State as designated in Delegation of Authority 284-1, dated February 13, 2009; and as designated by Executive Order 13251 (67 FR 1599), dated December 28, 2001;

(3)  Assists the Secretary and the Deputy Secretaries in the formulation and conduct of U.S. foreign policy;

(4)  Assists the Secretary and the Deputy Secretaries in carrying out the former's authority and responsibility for the overall direction, coordination, and supervision of interdepartmental activities of the U.S. Government abroad;

(5)  Assists the Deputy Secretaries in providing recommendations to the Secretary on all principal personnel appointments;

(6)  Assists the Deputy Secretaries in giving overall direction to the substantive functioning of the Department;

(7)  Assists the Secretary and the Deputy Secretaries in giving foreign policy guidance to other departments and agencies;

(8)  Assists the Secretary and the Deputy Secretaries in ensuring that the Department's relations with other departments and agencies of the U.S. Government are effectively coordinated, including giving general direction within the Department to political-military and intelligence matters and to relations with other departments and agencies on such matters;

(9)  Serves as crisis manager for the Department;

(10) Undertakes assignments as requested by the Secretary and the Deputy Secretaries;

(11) Assists the Secretary, on request, in representing the United States at international meetings, on special missions, in performing other representational assignments, and in presenting the Department's position before congressional committees;

(12) Provides policy guidance to the Department units reporting to the Under Secretary;

(13) Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for 1 FAM 041—Under Secretary for Political Affairs (P); and

(14) Negotiates, signs, and terminates treaties and other international agreements and authorizes other U.S. Government officials to do so under the Circular 175 procedure of the Department.

1 FAM 041.2  Management Oversight

(CT:ORG-310;   06-10-2013)

The following Department of State units report directly to the Under Secretary for Political Affairs (P):

(1)  Bureau of African Affairs (AF);

(2)  Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs (EAP);

(3)  Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs (EUR);

(4)  Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA);

(5)  Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs (NEA);

(6)  Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs (SCA);

(7)  Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO);

(8)  Office of International Religious Freedom (J/IRF); and

(9)  Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism (J/SEAS).

1 FAM 041.3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

In addition to Delegation of Authority 284-1 (see 1 FAM 041.1, subparagraph (2)), the following authorities apply:

(1)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 124—functions related to the Peace Corps;

(2)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 311 —Circular 175 Procedure authority;

(3)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 193—functions under the FY 92-93 State Authorization Act;

(4)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 210—certain functions under the Immigration laws;

(5)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 214—reports on People's Mujaheddin of Iran, Russian military operations, Occupied Tibet, activities of Cambodian Genocide Investigation;

(6)  Executive Order 13251, dated December 28, 2001;

(7)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 280-2 – authority to submit certain reports to Congress; and

(8)  Other authorities, as appropriate.

1 FAM 042  UNDER SECRETARY FOR ECONOMIC Growth, ENERGY, AND the environment (E)

1 FAM 042.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-295;   01-23-2013)

The Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment (E):

(1)  Reports directly to the Secretary of State (S);

(2)  Serves as the principal adviser to the Secretary and Deputy Secretaries on matters of foreign economic, energy, environmental, science and technology policies.  This includes trade, investment, commerce, business, sanctions, agriculture, economic development, international health, oceans, and innovation policy.  He or she directs formulation of and/or coordinates Department policies on economic, energy, and environmental issues.  He or she supervises the execution of such policy within the Department of State and represents the Department on such matters with other agencies of the U.S. Government.  In pursuing these functions, the Under Secretary coordinates, as appropriate, with the Director of Foreign Assistance; the Under Secretary for Political Affairs; the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security; the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs; and the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights (J) on matters within the areas of responsibilities of those officers;

(3)  Assists the Secretary and the Deputy Secretaries in carrying out their responsibilities in the field of economic assistance, both bilateral and multilateral;

(4)  Undertakes assignments as requested by the Secretary and Deputy Secretaries;

(5)  Assists the Secretary, on request, in representing the United States at international meetings, in performing other representational assignments, and in presenting the Department's position before congressional committees on economic matters;

(6)  Assists the Secretary, on request, in representing the Department at interdepartmental meetings including at the National Security Council, National Economic Council, Homeland Security Council, Council on Environmental Quality, and in providing policy advice to the Secretary on matters under consideration by these groups;

(7)  Pursuant to nomination by the President and approval by the Senate, serves as Alternate Governor for:

(a)  The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD);

(b)  The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB);

(c)  The Asian Development Bank (ADB);

(d)  The African Development Fund (AFDB); and

(e)  The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD);

(8)  Pursuant to designation by the President, serves as board member of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC);

(9)  At the direction of the National Security Council, fulfills the role of Foreign Affairs Sous Sherpa relating to the activities of the Group of Eight Industrial Nations (G-8);

(10) Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for 1 FAM 042—Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment (E);

(11) Serves on the National Intellectual Property Law Enforcement Coordination Council; and

(12) Negotiates, signs, and terminates treaties and other international agreements and authorizes other U.S. Government officials to do so under the Circular 175 procedure of the Department.

1 FAM 042.2  Management Oversight

(CT:ORG-551;   06-08-2020)

a. The following Department of State units report directly to the Under Secretary for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment (E):

(1)  Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs (EB);

(2)  Bureau of Energy Resources (ENR);

(3)  Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES);

(4)  Office of the Science and Technology Adviser (STAS);

(5)  Office of the Chief Economist (OCE); and

(6)  Office of Global Partnerships (GP).

b. See 1 FAM Exhibit 042.2 for an organizational chart of E.

1 FAM 042.3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-460;   07-17-2018)

The following authorities apply:

(1)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 118-2—Presidential Permits for Cross-Border Facilities;

(2)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 214—resumption of assistance, and expropriation report;

(3)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 251—Consultations with Treasury on Certain Measures to Combat Money Laundering;

(4)  Delegation of Authority No. 311—Negotiation, Conclusion and Termination of Treaties and Other International Agreements;

(5)  Department of State Delegation of Authority (Unnumbered)—Certification to Congress Regarding Methods of Shrimp Harvesting; and

(6)  Other authorities, as appropriate.

1 FAM 042.4  Office of Global Partnerships (E/GP)

(CT:ORG-551;   06-08-2020)

The Managing Director for Global Partnerships (E/GP) and staff serve to advance the Department's foreign policy priorities through conducting private sector engagement and building public-private partnerships.

(1)  Serves as the entry point for collaboration between the U.S. Department of State, the public and private sectors, and civil society;

(2)  Expands private sector collaboration through a range of engagements that include elevating the role and contributions of the private sector to diplomacy and development and convening private sector stakeholders to explore collaboration on top policy priorities with relevant representatives within the Department;

(3)  Develops, pilots, and implements multi-stakeholder partnerships to measurably and meaningfully advance the Department's top policy priorities;

(4)  Develops and maintains the Department’s policy on doing public-private partnerships;

(5)  Promotes the use of innovative private sector engagement tools and mechanisms to advance the Department's priorities;

(6)  Conducts due diligence research on all potential partners and donors for the Department to help identify entities and individuals that may pose a conflict of interest for the Department in accordance with 2 FAM 960 and 2 FAM 970;

(7)  Provides training and consulting services to other bureaus and missions on private sector engagement and on how to build partnerships;

(8)  Advises senior leadership across the Department on how to integrate private sector engagement into strategic planning documents to promote and enable private sector collaboration.

1 FAM 043  UNDER SECRETARY FOR ARMS CONTROL AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY (T)

1 FAM 043.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-295;   01-23-2013)

The Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T):

(1)  Reports directly to the Secretary of State (S);

(2)  Serves as Secretary of State as designated by Executive Order 13251 (67 FR 1599), dated December 28, 2001;

(3)  Directs and coordinates arms control and international security policies for the Department, including oversight of negotiations and implementation and verification of international agreements in arms control and international security;

(4)  Directs and coordinates nonproliferation policy for the Department, including missile, nuclear, chemical, biological and conventional weapons proliferation.  By statute, he or she coordinates diplomatic efforts to obtain the agreement of all appropriate countries to the Missile Technology Control Regime and coordinates policies within the United States on strategies for restricting the export of components of missiles capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction.  By delegation, the Under Secretary exercises various authorities relating to the imposition of proliferation sanctions on foreign persons and countries as required by U.S. law.  He or she directs the negotiation of agreements with foreign countries to implement U.S. nonproliferation policies.  By delegation, the Under Secretary oversees and provides policy guidance for use of the Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund;

(5)  Directs and coordinates export control policy for the Department.  By delegation, he or she regulates the export and temporary import of defense articles and services under the Arms Export Control Act (including the issuance, revocation, or suspension of export licenses and related regulations) and determines which articles shall be deemed to be defense articles.  By delegation, he or she reviews, formulates policy with respect to, and reports as appropriate, unauthorized arms transfers or substantial violations of applicable military assistance agreements;

(6)  By delegation, he or she provides policy direction and coordination of selected foreign assistance programs (economic support funds, military assistance, including excess defense articles, and foreign military sales and loan programs).  This includes responsibility for the continuous supervision and general direction of all such programs to insure effective integration with each other and with economic assistance programs both at home and abroad.  In the exercise of this responsibility, the Under Secretary shall:

(a)  Ensure that all such assistance programs are planned, developed, and implemented in furtherance of U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives;

(b)  Direct a continuing system of planning and coordination of assistance programs in order to effect the fullest degree of integration in furtherance of the objectives of these programs;

(c)  Direct the development of an integrated presentation of such assistance programs; and

(d)  Determine whether there shall be such an assistance program in a certain country, and if so, the value thereof;

(7)  Assists the Secretary in representing the United States at international meetings, in performing other representational assignments, and in presenting the Department's position before Congressional committees;

(8)  Undertakes other additional duties as may be requested by the Secretary or the Deputy Secretaries; and

(9)  Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for 1 FAM 043—Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T).

1 FAM 043.2  Management Oversight

(CT:ORG-246;   06-07-2011)

The following Department of State units report directly to the Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security (T):

(1)  Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM);

(2)  Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN); and

(3)  Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance (AVC) report directly to the Under Secretary (T).

1 FAM 043.3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

The following authorities apply:

(1)  State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 sections 1 and 45, as amended in 22 U.S.C. 2651a;

(2)  Dire Emergency Supplemental Appropriations and Transfers, Urgent Supplementals, and Correcting Enrollment Errors Act section 407 (June 30, 1989);

(3)  Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 section 624(e) (22 U.S.C. 2384, 1961) (coordinating security assistance programs);

(4)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 214—Delegation of Responsibilities Under the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995, and Certain related Acts, 59 FR 50790 (September 20, 1994) (report on Middle East arms sales policy; prohibition on incentive payments under the Arms Export control Act; notification to Congress on certain events involving the missile technology control scheme; and advisory opinions regarding sanctions for nuclear proliferation);

(5)  Delegation of Authority 293-2, dated October 23, 2011 – delegating numerous responsibilities to T, including all responsibilities of the Director, Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, that were transferred to the Secretary;

(6)  Executive Order 13251, dated December 28, 2001;

(7)  Executive Order 13637 (arms control);

(8)  Executive Order 12163 section 1-201 (military assistance);

(9)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 311, Negotiation, Conclusion and Termination of Treaties and Other International Agreements; and

(10) Other authorities, as appropriate.

1 FAM 044  UNDER SECRETARY FOR MANAGEMENT (M)

1 FAM 044.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-246;   06-07-2011)

The Under Secretary for Management (M):

(1)  Reports directly to the Secretary of State (S);

(2)  Serves as a principal adviser to the Secretary of State on all matters involving the allocation of State Department resources in support of the President's foreign policy objectives;

(3)  Develops and executes management policies, including control of positions, funds, and other worldwide Department resources required to implement the foreign policies of the United States;

(4)  Directs Department management programs involving relations with the Congress, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and other foreign affairs agencies;

(5)  Is responsible for the organization, operations, and the assignment of functions within the Department;

(6)  Prescribes rules and regulations pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary by 22 U.S.C. 2651a, 22 U.S.C. 3926 and other relevant provisions of law, to the extent delegated to him or her and approves, when appropriate, re-delegations of such authority in order to carry out the functions conferred upon the Under Secretary for Management;

(7)  Oversees the Department's information security program;

(8)  Negotiates, signs, and terminates treaties and other international agreements and authorizes other U.S. Government officials to do so under the Circular 175 procedure of the Department;

(9)  Assists the Secretary, on request, in representing the United States at international meetings, in performing other representational assignments, and in presenting the Department's position before congressional committees;

(10) As the Department's designated OIG follow-up official, has personal responsibility for ensuring that:

(a)  Systems for follow-up, resolution, and corrective action on audits, inspections, evaluations, and other reviews are documented and in place;

(b)  Timely responses are made to all OIG recommendations, regardless of implementation responsibilities;

(c)  Disagreements are resolved;

(d)  Corrective actions are actually taken; and

(e)  Semiannual reports are sent to the Secretary furnishing a listing of all OIG recommendations not resolved for more than 6 months, the reasons why they have not been resolved, and M’s plan for ensuring resolution; the number of recommendations resolved during the reporting period; the amount of disallowed costs; and collections, offsets, write-offs, demands for payment, other monetary benefits resulting from all audits, inspections, evaluations, and other reviews, and updates on the status of those recommendations reported unresolved for the previous reporting period;

(11) Exercises authority on behalf of the Secretary of State over management-related functions vested in the Department of State and the management of the Foreign Service personnel system;

(12) Serves as Secretary of State as designated by Executive Order 13251 (67 FR 1599), dated December 28, 2001;

(13) Directs and administers the Department’s worldwide information resources; and

(14) Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for 1 FAM 044—Under Secretary for Management (M).

1 FAM 044.2  Management Oversight

(CT:ORG-295;   01-23-2013)

a. The following Department of State bureaus report directly to the Under Secretary (M):

(1)  Bureau of Administration (A);

(2)  Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA);

(3)  Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS);

(4)  Bureau of Information Resource Management (IRM); however, the head of IRM, when carrying out the functions of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) as established by the Clinger-Cohen Act, reports directly to the Secretary;

(6)  Medical Services and Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO);

(5)  Bureau of Human Resources (HR);

(6)  Foreign Service Institute (FSI); and

(7)  Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO);

(8)  The Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services (CGFS); and

(9)  The Bureau of Budget and Planning (BP).

1 FAM 044.3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-587;   09-21-2021)

The Secretary of State has delegated many management-related functions to M.  The following are a representative list of authorities that have been delegated.  For those using Department computers, the full list can be found on the A/GIS/DIR website under Delegations of Authority:

(1)  Delegation of Authority 514, the Secretary of State’s general delegation of management-related functions to the Under Secretary, dated April 20, 2021;

(2)  Delegation of Authority 473, authority to approve submissions to Congress of the certifications required by section 160(a) of the Public Law 100-204, dated June 19, 2019;

(3)  Delegation of Authority 390, authority to accept personnel under the International Organizations Immunities Act, dated November 19, 2015;

(4)  Delegation of Authority 386, authority to waive the inclusion of SCIFs in certain U.S. diplomatic facilities, dated May 28, 2015;

(5)  Delegation of Authority 378, authority to make the determination that an individual’s death resulted from terrorism or an act of terrorism, for approving payment of certain death benefits under the Foreign Service Act, dated Jun 24, 2014;

(6)  Delegation of Authority No. 311, negotiation, conclusion and termination of treaties and other international agreements, dated March 28, 2008;

(7)  Delegation of Authority 175-5, authority to issue waiver determinations with respect to financial interests to Department principals (except the Secretary), dated October 10, 2009;

(8)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 125, Delegation of Federal Advisory Committee management functions, dated November 7, 1972;

(9)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 293-2, Delegation of Authorities under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and other related acts, dated October 23, 2011; and

(10) Other authorities as appropriate.

1 FAM 044.4  Under Secretary for Management Offices

1 FAM 044.4-1  Director of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms (M/FA)

(CT:ORG-246;   06-07-2011)

The Director of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms (M/FA) is responsible for furnishing and maintaining the Diplomatic Reception Rooms and offices and reception rooms of the Secretary, Deputy Secretaries, and Under Secretary for Political Affairs.  The Director is responsible for assembling and maintaining the Americana Project's collection of U.S. antique furniture, paintings, and decorative objects from the 18th and early 19th centuries, made possible by contributed funds.

1 FAM 044.4-2  White House Liaison (M/WHL)

(CT:ORG-460;   07-17-2018)

The White House Liaison (M/WHL):

(1)  Advises, assists, and facilitates all noncareer appointments within the Department, including Presidential Appointees requiring Senate confirmation (PAS), Senior Executive Service (SES), and Schedule C employees.  He or she coordinates between the Department and the White House on the selection and appointment of all boards, commissions, Presidential delegations, and conferences; and

(2)  At the direction of the Under Secretary for Management (M), the White House Liaison facilitates, supports, and represents the Department to the White House, interagency working groups, and other executive organizations.

(3)  Finalizes and clears all U.S. delegation lists for international conferences, whether the proposed delegates are from the government or private sector.

1 FAM 044.4-3  Office of Management Strategy and Solutions (M/SS)

(CT:ORG-556;   09-17-2020)

a. The Director for the Office of Management Strategy and Solutions (M/SS) is an Assistant Secretary-equivalent position responsible for leading the central management organization responsible for management strategy, consultation, and analysis reporting directly to the Under Secretary for Management (M). 

b. M/SS comprises three functional areas, each led by a Managing Director: Policy and Global Presence, Consulting and Advanced Projects, and the Center for Analytics.  Together, they work in collaboration with other Department stakeholders on management issues to:

(1)  Develop policy solutions to advise and guide bureaus on cross cutting topics and continuously improve programs critical to effective management, in addition to sharing existing knowledge and solutions throughout the Department;

(2)  Build and deploy business acumen through advisory and consultative services to solve management and policy challenges through qualitative and quantitative analysis; and

(3)  Elevate the role of data in diplomacy by establishing the foundational structure for a modern analytical capability and solving management and policy challenges through qualitative and quantitative analysis.

1 FAM 044.4-3(A)  M/SS Policy and Global Presence (PGP)

(CT:ORG-556;   09-17-2020)

Policy and Global Presence (PGP) is led by a Managing Director, who reports to the DAS-equivalent M/SS Deputy Director.  Staff are responsible for the following:

(1)  Coordinate and oversee the Department’s initiatives to implement the President’s Management Agenda; 

(2)  Manage the Accountability Review Board (ARB) process for the Secretary of State, and support the M/SS Director as Chair of the ARB/Permanent Coordinating Committee;

(3)  Direct Enterprise Governance Board (EGB) Secretariat activities, including chairing the EGB Working Group;

(4)  Represent the Department as an agency customer of the International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) management platform; 

(5)  Support the M/SS Director as Chair of the ICASS Executive Board;

(6)  Strengthen Department accountability by shepherding communication with OIG and GAO for the Under Secretary for Management (M) and M/SS recommendations and findings;

(7)  Improve U.S. government directives and policies related to Chief-of-Mission authority and affecting the leadership of Chiefs of Mission implementing U.S. foreign policy;

(8)  Advise senior officials on Chief-of-Mission authority; and support the implementation of the National Security Decision Directive NSDD-38 and country clearance processes; 

(9)  Conduct overseas presence reviews of all missions on a regular basis, and prior to planning any new post construction, in order to determine the optimal staffing levels required to meet foreign policy goals;

(10) Identify potential efficiencies through outsourcing, empowerment of local staff, regionalization, and other rightsizing techniques; 

(11) Perform other duties as assigned by the Director for PGP or the M/SS Director or Deputy Director.

1 FAM 044.4-3(B)  M/SS Consulting and Advanced Projects (CAP)

(CT:ORG-556;   09-17-2020)

Consulting and Advanced Projects (CAP) is led by a Managing Director, who reports to the DAS-equivalent M/SS Deputy Director.  Staff are responsible for the following:

(1)  Serve as the primary M representative to the Regional Initiatives Council (RIC) and lead efforts to optimize the global management support platform;

(2)  Provide expertise in management analytics, performance measurement, and Department-wide management best practices to improve management effectiveness and customer satisfaction; 

(3)  Design and implement solutions to enterprise-wide challenges through in-house management consulting, process and quality improvement programs, and sustainability initiatives;

(4)  Provide consultative services and tools and engender best practices in areas including, but not limited to, project management, the overseas support platform, process improvement,  operational planning, change management, scenario planning, greening and sustainability initiatives, building tactical relationships, and negotiation preparation;

(5)  Deploy analytical tools and consultative services to enable a cost effective, high quality, and mission-oriented support platform for DoS employees, dependents, and the inter-agency community at Department locations globally;

(6)  Facilitate discussions, brainstorming, and consensus-building among teams to help them define their current and future operational support of Department priorities;

(7)  Liaise directly with counterparts in the Intelligence Community (IC) and other agencies on behalf of the Under Secretary for Management (M) on areas of shared interest to facilitate interagency cooperation, eliminate duplicative activity, and solve common problems;

(8)  Serve as the Executive Secretariat for the Greening Council and for Under Secretary for Management (M) in his/her role as Chief Sustainability Officer and Chair of the Greening Council for the Department of State; lead and coordinate environmental sustainability compliance across the Department; 

(9)  At the enterprise level, identify and accelerate existing collaborative partnerships and solutions to address Department challenges, and where such partnerships do not exist, to foster these in collaboration with other stakeholders;

(10) Perform other duties as assigned by the Director for CAP or the M/SS Director or Deputy Director.

1 FAM 044.4-3(C)  M/SS Center for Analytics (CfA)

(CT:ORG-556;   09-17-2020)

a. The Center for Analytics Directorate is led by a Managing Director, who also encumbers the title and responsibilities of the Chief Data Officer (CDO), who reports to the DAS-equivalent M/SS Deputy Director. 

b. The core goals for the Center are to deploy an enterprise capability for cross-functional data management and analysis; enhance workforce capabilities and culture to conduct data management and analytics; direct and support data standards and governance; and modernize the Department’s information technology infrastructure to support enterprise level data management and advanced analytics across multiple domains. 

c.  Staff are responsible for the following: 

(1)  Enterprise Analytics, supporting the Department by providing expert advice on analytics and methodology; developing cross-functional analytical tools, products, and capabilities; deploying platforms that enable agency-wide use and adoption of analytics to inform decision-making; and performing the responsibilities of the Department’s Statistical Officer (SO) to include data quality frameworks;

(2)  Enterprise Data Management, supporting the Department by ensuring compliance with related regulatory and statutory data requirements; enabling data to be inventoried and discoverable, readily accessible and interoperable; securely used and shared by all stakeholders; expanding capacity for data management; and serving as steward of the Department’s Enterprise Data Strategy, Agency Priority Goal for Data and Analytics, Enterprise Data Catalog and Master Reference Dataset;

(3)  Enterprise Data and Analytics Communities, cultivating and supporting the Department’s related communities by ensuring productive agency-wide engagements on data management and analytics, introducing related innovations, enhancements and best practices; and serving as the executive secretariat for the Department’s Enterprise Data Council (EDC), Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence Practitioner Group (ML/AI-PG), Application and Data Coordination Working Group (ADCWG), and Enterprise Records Management Working Group (ERMWG);

(a)  The EDC is chaired by the CDO and comprised of Senior Department officials from each Under Secretariat deemed necessary by the Under Secretary for Management (M), including the SO and the Department’s Evaluation Officer(s). 

(b)  EDC membership, charter, and actions are regularly reported to OMB through the Federal Data Strategy.

(4)  Enterprise Data Management and Analytics skills and culture, partnering with Foreign Service Institute and other entities to ensure data management and analytics training and capacity building is made available to enhance workforce capabilities and with Global Talent Management to infuse and cultivate talent and a culture that embraces the use of data-formed insights;

(5)  Enterprise information technology and platform, and working closely with the CIO to specifically enable the Department to conduct enterprise-wide data management and advanced analytics; onboarding new technologies, tools and methods; enabling sharing of data and analyses across the agency and cross-domain;

(6)  Enterprise Data Management Strategy, creating and maintaining a roadmap for data governance and management that enables the Department to meet regulatory and statutory requirements; enables effective use of data management that generates and uses analytical insights to support the foreign policy of the United States;

(7)  Perform other duties as assigned by the Director for CfA or the M/SS Director or Deputy Director.

1 FAM 044.4-4  Major Events and Conferences Staff (M/MECS)

(CT:ORG-322;   11-19-2013)

The Office of the Major Events and Conferences Staff (M/MECS) serves as the Department of State’s logistics office for all major international summits, peace talks, and other international meetings hosted domestically and supported by the Department of State.  Under the direction of the Under Secretary for Management, the office is responsible for creating, staffing, and executing the management logistics platform upon which these major events unfold.  In addition, the office serves in an advisory capacity to functional and regional bureaus should they need assistance with conferences as well as advises M on ways to improve conference-planning procedures for the Department.

1 FAM 045  UNDER SECRETARY FOR CIVILIAN SECURITY, DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS (J)

1 FAM 045.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-280;   08-10-2012)

The Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights (J):

(1)  Reports directly to the Secretary of State (S);

(2)  Serves as Secretary of State as designated by Executive Order 13251 (67 FR 1599), dated December 28, 2001;

(3)  Provides policy direction and coordination for the Department in:

(a)  Strengthening civilian protection and security;

(b)  Preventing and responding to conflict;

(c)  Developing and strengthening Rule of Law;

(d)  Advancing the United States' humanitarian policies, practices, and programs around the world;

(e)  Deepening respect for human rights;

(f)   Countering terrorism and violent extremism;

(g)  Achieving accountability for atrocities;

(h)  Promoting peace and genuine security;

(i)   Building democratic institutions; and

(j)   Empowering young people as economic and civic actors through U.S. programs;

(k)  Developing United States' policy on promoting religious freedom abroad;

(l)   Implementing United States' policies regarding Anti-Semitism;

(4)  For designated areas of responsibility, directs the negotiation and implementation of agreements with foreign countries and oversees related diplomatic efforts;

(5)  Assists the Secretary in representing the United States at international meetings, in performing other representational assignments, and in presenting the Department's position before Congressional committees;

(6)  Undertakes other additional duties as may be requested by the Secretary or the Deputy Secretaries;

(7)  Negotiates, signs, and terminates treaties and other international agreements and authorizes other U.S. Government officials to do so under the Circular 175 procedure of the Department; and

(8)  Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for 1 FAM 045—Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights (J).

1 FAM 045.2  Management Oversight

(CT:ORG-460;   07-17-2018)

a. The following Department of State units report directly to the Under Secretary (J):

(1)  Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations (CSO);

(2)  Bureau of Counter Terrorism (CT);

(3)  Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL);

(4)  Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL);

(5)  Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM);

(6)  Office of Global Criminal Justice (J/GCJ); and

(7)  Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP)

 1 FAM 045.3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-280;   08-10-2012)

The following authorities apply:

(1)  The Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights is authorized by 22 U.S.C. 2651a(b)(4);

(2)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 311—Negotiation, Conclusion, and Termination of Treaties and Other International Agreements; and

(3)  Other authorities, as appropriate.

1 FAM 045.4  Organization

(CT:ORG-280;   08-10-2012)

An organization chart of the Office of the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights (J) is found at 1 FAM Exhibit 045.5.

1 FAM 045.5  Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP)

1 FAM 045.5-1  J/TIP Management

(CT:ORG-323;   12-05-2013)

A Senior Advisor to the Secretary and Ambassador-at-Large, supported by a principal deputy director and a second deputy, oversees J/TIP.

a. The Ambassador-at-Large:

(1)  Reports to the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights (J);

(2)  Formulates, directs, and implements the Department’s policies on human trafficking;

(3)  Provides policy counsel at decision-making levels on matters relating to the integration of human trafficking issues into U.S. foreign policy;

(4)  Advises the Secretary of State and Deputy Secretaries of State on human trafficking issues;

(5)  Supports the Secretary in his or her capacity as Chair of the President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (PITF), the Cabinet-level entity authorized by the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000 (Public Law 106-386), codified at 22 U.S.C. 7001 et seq., and established by Executive Order 13257 (Feb. 13, 2002), to coordinate federal efforts to combat trafficking in persons;

(6)  Chairs the Senior Policy Operating Group (SPOG) on trafficking in persons, which coordinates interagency policy, grants, research, and planning issues involving international trafficking in persons and the implementation—both foreign and domestic--of the U.S. anti-trafficking law, the TVPA and its reauthorizations; coordinates with other U.S. Government departments and agencies on human trafficking issues;

(7)  Oversees the drafting, production, and issuance of the Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report;

(8)  Makes recommendations to the Secretary and Director of Foreign Assistance regarding funding for anti-trafficking projects and compliance with section 634a of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1);

(9)  Represents the Department in international and multilateral negotiations on human trafficking matters; negotiates anti-trafficking agreements, protocols, and conventions when authorized in writing by the Secretary or an officer specifically authorized by the Secretary for that purpose (11 FAM 724.1);

(10) Engages with UN partners towards the universal ratification and full implementation of the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons Especially Women and Children, supplementing the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime;

(11) Engages in senior level diplomacy to foster anti-trafficking policies and measures around the world;

(12) Raises public awareness, speaks to diverse U.S. and foreign audiences to educate them about human trafficking;

(13) Provides guidance regarding coordination on foreign policy and domestic implementation matters relating to human trafficking;

(14) Sets priorities and allocates resources towards the Office’s highest priorities;

(15) Provides overall management of the office, including the selection and recruitment of personnel to carry out the office’s functions; and

(16) Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for J/TIP.

b. The deputies have the following responsibilities:

(1)  Both the principal and the second deputy advise the Ambassador, at his or her direction, on policy formulation and action relating to human trafficking; coordinate with other elements of the State Department, U.S. missions overseas, and other U.S. government agencies; build support for U.S. anti-trafficking policy with Congress, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector; and oversee compliance with international agreements relating to human trafficking;

(2)  The Principal Deputy Director is responsible for the oversight of the Reports and Political Affairs team and the Resource, Management, and Planning team, coordinating multilateral diplomacy, and overall office management;

(3)  The Deputy Director is responsible for the oversight of the International Programs team and the Public Engagement team; and

(4)  The Principal Deputy and Deputy set goals and objectives, and monitor and direct training and use of staff and other resources to achieve office priorities.

1 FAM 045.5-2  J/TIP Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-380;   11-10-2015)

a. The Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP), under the direction of the Ambassador-at-Large has the following general responsibilities:

(1)  Coordinate and lead the U.S. government’s global engagement on human trafficking pursuant to its establishment by the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) of 2000, which defined severe forms of trafficking in persons as:

·         Sex trafficking in which a commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion, or in which the person induced to perform such an act has not attained 18 years of age; or

·         The recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or services, through the use of force, fraud or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.

(2)  Pursue policies, practices, and partnerships that combat modern slavery or trafficking in persons, umbrella terms for activities in which someone obtains or holds another person in compelled service, including forced labor.  Upholds the “3P” paradigm of protecting victims, preventing trafficking, and prosecuting traffickers, as well as the fourth P:  building new partnerships with governments and civil society around the world;

(3)  Work in partnership and collaboration with regional bureaus and U.S. missions on all activities related to diplomatic engagement on trafficking in persons (TIP) issues, particularly in association with the TIP Report;

(4)  Draft and issue the annual TIP Report—the principal diplomatic and diagnostic tool to guide our relations with foreign governments on human trafficking;

(5)  Support the Secretary of State in his or her role as Chair of the President’s Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons and in the implementation and oversight of PITF activities;

(6)  Manage the SPOG on trafficking in persons, which coordinates interagency policy, grants, research, and planning issues involving international trafficking in persons and the implementation of the TVPA and its reauthorizations, and its associated committees and ad hoc working groups in areas such as research/data, grant-making, provision of victim services, and procurement;

(7)  Issue and oversee the implementation of foreign assistance grants, cooperative agreements, and interagency agreements to implement anti-trafficking programming; formulates anti-trafficking programs and monitors the implementation of anti-trafficking grants and cooperative agreements awarded by the office;

(8)  Engage NGOs, faith-based groups, corporations, academia, the media, Congress, and other communities to raise awareness on human trafficking and/or build partnerships to strengthen victim assistance and collaboration with law enforcement;

(9)  Develop partnerships with the business sector to enhance and leverage their abilities to provide in-kind assistance to counter human trafficking, to develop and implement internal codes of conduct, and to ensure that there is not slavery in supply chains;

(10) Work to increase research and data—both unclassified and classified—on human trafficking; and

(11) Engage in diplomacy with international and multilateral organizations on human trafficking.

b. Reporting and Political Affairs responsibilities:

(1)  Engage foreign government interlocutors and other stakeholders (international organizations, NGOs, religious entities, academics, etc.) regarding human trafficking issues;

(2)  Maintain information on global trafficking and prepare briefing memoranda, analyses, and talking points on human trafficking in countries around the world;

(3)  Write the annual TIP Report, which both guides U.S. engagement with foreign governments on human trafficking, and assists foreign governments in their work on the prosecution of traffickers, protection of trafficking victims, and prevention programs through the country-specific recommendations contained in the TIP Report; and

(4)  Work in partnership with regional bureaus and overseas missions in relationship to the TIP Report, and work with them and foreign governments to support engagement in relation to the TIP Report’s associated recommendations.

c.  International programs responsibilities:

(1)  Award and fund grants and cooperative agreements to counter trafficking, guided by trends and needs identified in the TIP Report.  Make annual funding designations through an open and competitive grant process; 

(2)  Provide on-the-ground assessments and assistance to the funded projects; and

(3)  Support foreign government anti-trafficking efforts through targeted training and technical assistance in conjunction with NGO and international organization partners.  Assistance may include law enforcement training, legislative drafting, and promising practices in victim services. 

d. Public engagement responsibilities:

(1)  Act as the Office’s liaison to other U.S. government agencies, NGOs, corporations, academia, research institutes, the media, and the general public on human trafficking; 

(2)  Support the Secretary of State in her role as Chair of the PITF and assists the Ambassador in his role as Chair of the SPOG.  Facilitates and/or co-chair the committees and working groups under the SPOG;

(3)  Work to increase public awareness through targeted media outreach and public outreach and foster partnerships with NGOs, companies, universities, and faith-based organizations to amplify promising practices; and

(4)  Engage Congress on the human trafficking issue by responding to queries, organizing briefings, hearings, and meetings with member offices as well as providing comments on proposed legislation.

e. Resource management and planning responsibilities:

(1)  Provide executive support services which include human resources, budget formulation and execution, procurement of goods and services, security, training, general services, office management, and administrative support; and

(2)  Perform all strategic planning activities, performance reporting, budget-related reporting, and other activities related to the federal budget process.

1 FAM 045.5-3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-280;   08-10-2012)

The Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (J/TIP) derives its authority from the following:

(1)  William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008, Public Law 110-457;

(2)  Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005, Public Law 109-164;

(3)  Executive Order 13333 Amending Executive Order 13257 To Implement the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2003 (March 18, 2004);

(4)  Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2003, Public Law 108-193;

(5)  National Security Presidential Directive on Combating Trafficking in Persons/NSPD-22 (December 16, 2002);

(6)  Executive Order 13257 on President’s Interagency Task Force To Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (February 13, 2002);

(7)  Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, Public Law 106-386 (Div. A);

(8)  Presidential Executive Memorandum on Steps to Combat Violence Against Women and Trafficking in Women and Girls (March 11, 1998); and

(9)  Foreign Assistance Act, as amended, Public Law 87-195.

1 FAM 045.6  Office of International Religious Freedom (J/IRF)

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

J/IRF is headed by the Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom.  The President appoints the Ambassador at Large with the advice and consent of the Senate.  For policy matters, the Ambassador at Large reports directly to the Secretary of State.  For matters relating to religious freedom programs and other activities to ensure effective day-to-day administration and coordination, the Ambassador at Large reports to the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights (J).

1 FAM 045.6-1  Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

Responsibilities of Ambassador at Large:

(1)  Advancing the right to freedom of religion abroad;

(2)  Denouncing violations of that right, and recommending responses by the U.S. Government when that right is violated;

(3)  Integrating U.S. international religious freedom policies and strategies into U.S. foreign policy efforts;

(4)  Acting as a principal advisor to the President and the principal advisor to the Secretary on matters affecting religious freedom abroad and, with the advice from the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, making recommendations regarding the policies of the U.S. Government toward governments that violate freedom of religion or that fail to ensure the individual’s right to religious belief and practice, and recommendations regarding policies to advance the right to religious freedom abroad;

(5)  Subject to the direction of the President and the Secretary of State, acting as the U.S. representative in matters relating to religious freedom abroad; and

(6)  Preparing the annual International Religious Freedom Report and sections of the annual Human Rights Report relating to freedom of religion and freedom from discrimination based on religion under section 116(d) and section 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d) and 22 U.S.C. 2304(b))On May 1 of each year, or the first day thereafter on which the appropriate House of Congress is in session, the Secretary, with the assistance of the Ambassador at Large, submits to Congress the annual report on International Religious Freedom, supplementing the most recent Human Rights Report.  The report is written with the assistance of and input from all posts; and identifies on a country-by-country basis developments in protection and deterioration of the right to religious freedom.

1 FAM 045.6-2  Office of International Religious Freedom (J/IRF)

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

The Office of International Religious Freedom (J/IRF):

(1)  Supports the Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom;

(2)  Continuously monitors foreign governments’ respect for the human right of freedom of religion or belief, and interrelated freedoms, including freedoms of peaceful assembly, association, and expression, as relevant;

(3)  Develops and implements U.S. policy on promoting religious freedom abroad, including in multilateral forums.  Formulates approaches and strategies to advance respect for religious freedom, including country strategies, and provide policy guidance to regional bureaus and U.S. embassies abroad.  Ensures that U.S. religious freedom policies and issues of concern are taken adequately into account in all bilateral relationships and are considered in decisions to provide foreign assistance, as appropriate;

(4)  Interacts with foreign government officials in the United States and abroad to highlight U.S. religious freedom concerns and build support for respect for freedom of religion or belief abroad.  Meets with representatives from Congress, other agencies, the nongovernmental organization (NGO) community, and the private sector in the United States and abroad to explain and build support for U.S. religious freedom policies;

(5)  Furnishes country-specific expertise on religious freedom abuses and practices abroad to senior U.S. officials, other federal agencies, and other Department bureaus and offices to assist them in the performance of their designated responsibilities;

(6)  Designs, evaluates, implements, and monitors foreign assistance programs designed to promote religious freedom.  Provides guidance and assistance to other bureaus, offices, and agencies on religious freedom promotion programs and activities;

(7)  Works with the Foreign Service Institute (FSI), Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA), and other relevant agencies and offices to develop and implement training of U.S. foreign affairs professionals, as well as refugee, asylum, and immigration officials, on religious freedom issues; and

(8)  Is responsible in cooperation with other bureaus and U.S. Government agencies for fulfilling the mandates of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998,  including producing the Annual Report on International Religious Freedom, covering all countries; developing recommendations to the Secretary for the religious freedom designations under the Act; and implementing the visa ineligibility for foreign government officials responsible for particularly severe violations of religious freedom (see 9 FAM 302.7-3).

1 FAM 045.6-3  Special Advisor for Religious Minorities

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

The Special Advisor for Religious Minorities reports to the Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom and supports efforts to advance religious freedom around the world.  The Special Advisor alerts the Ambassador at Large to opportunities for advancing existing policy, helps formulate new policy approaches, and provides strategic inputs with relation to the rights of members of religious minorities.

1 FAM 045.6-4  Executive Director

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

The OES-DRL Executive Director also supports J/IRF.  See 1 FAM 545 for the services provided to J/IRF.

1 FAM 045.6-5  Authorities

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

Authorities related to the functions of the Office of International Religious Freedom (J/IRF) include:

(1)  International Religious Freedom Act of 1998, Public Law 105-292;

(2)  Frank R. Wolf International Religious Freedom Act of 2016, Public Law 114-281; and

(3)  Near East and South Central Asia Religious Freedom Act of 2014, Public Law 113-161.

1 FAM 045.7  Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism (J/SEAS)

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

The Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism (J/SEAS):

(1)  As established by the Global Anti-Semitism Review Act of 2004, J/SEAS serves as the key Department strategist and focal point in the design, development, and implementation of policies and projects to support international efforts addressing anti-Semitism;

(2)  Reports to the Secretary and is located within the organizational structure of the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights (J);

(3)  Represents the U.S. position on anti-Semitism in diplomatic engagements, international discussions, and public fora:

(a)  Engages in discussions with foreign government officials and representatives of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) regarding anti-Semitism; and

(b)  Establishes and maintains an on-going dialogue between and among the United States and the United Nations and other international or regional entities on this issue;

(4)  Researches, analyzes, and provides options for positions and programs most likely to be successful in combating and ending anti-Semitism and improving protection of human rights.  He or she integrates actions on anti-Semitism with other diplomatic efforts to increase international respect for human rights;

(5)  Serves as a principal policy advisor and key official in developing, formulating, presenting, negotiating, and implementing Department and U.S. Government policies regarding anti-Semitism; and

(6)  Provides input on anti-Semitism for the Department’s annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices and annual International Religious Freedom Report.

1 FAM 045.7-1  Executive Director

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

The OES-DRL Executive Director also supports J/SEAS.  See 1 FAM 545 for the services provided to J/SEAS.

1 FAM 045.8  Office of Global Criminal Justice (J/GCJ)

1 FAM 045.8-1  J/GCJ Leadership

(CT:ORG-589;   09-30-2021)

The Office of Global Criminal Justice (J/GCJ) is led by an Ambassador at Large.  The Ambassador at Large:

(1)  Reports to the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights;

(2)  Advises the Secretary of State, Deputy Secretaries of State, and the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights on accountability for war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, and ethnic cleansing (“WCGE atrocities”);

(3)  Provides policy counsel at all decision-making levels on matters relating to the integration of justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities into U.S. foreign policy;

(4)  Participates in the formulation, direction, and implementation of U.S. policies with regard to WCGE atrocities;

(5)  Facilitates coordination of U.S. foreign policy and domestic implementation of policies relating to justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities;

(6)  Engages in senior-level diplomacy and public outreach around the world to foster policies and measures that advance justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities;

(7)  Represents the Department before Congress and in bilateral and multilateral negotiations and discussions on matters pertaining to justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities;

(8)   Sets J/GCJ priorities, allocates resources, provides overall coordination and management of J/GCJ, including the recruitment and selection of personnel to carry out the Office’s functions, and ensures that personnel are conversant on the full range of policy issues relevant to the work of the Office, and receive training, as appropriate, to advance the work of the office.

1 FAM 045.8-2  J/GCJ Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-589;   09-30-2021)

In accordance with the current National Security Strategy and ancillary policy documents applicable to GCJ and all other relevant authorities, including those in 1 FAM 045.8-3, and under the leadership of the Ambassador at Large, the Office of Global Criminal Justice (J/GCJ), has the following responsibilities:

(1)  J/GCJ has primary responsibility for leading the formulation and execution of U.S. policies regarding responses to, and accountability for, WCGE atrocities, and participates in the formulation and execution of U.S. policies regarding atrocity prevention;

(2)  J/GCJ staff advise the Ambassador at Large and, under his or her leadership, other Department principals; J/GCJ serves as the primary coordinating office within the Department (the lead agency within the federal government with respect to justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities) and as the Department’s primary liaison to other federal departments and agencies with respect to all matters pertaining to justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities;

(3)  J/GCJ has the lead role in the Department with regard to the formulation of transitional justice policy and advises U.S. government officials, as well as works with domestic and foreign entities, on transitional justice processes and strategies, to include assisting with the establishment and sustainment of transitional justice mechanisms, such as judicial processes, amnesties, truth commissions, fact-finding initiatives, reparations programs, memorialization, institutional reforms, and other strategies to reduce the risk of recurrence;

(4)  J/GCJ has the lead role in the Department with regard to policy formulation toward international, hybrid, and other tribunals and investigative and fact-finding mechanisms whose respective mandates focus on WCGE atrocities;

(5)  J/GCJ has the lead role in the Department with regard to analyzing evidence of, making recommendations for, and preparing and clearing the necessary documentation for the Secretary to make atrocity determinations;

(6)  J/GCJ conducts international, multilateral, and public diplomacy with respect to justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities, and engages with international, hybrid, and other tribunals and investigative and fact-finding mechanisms, as well as non-governmental organizations, international organizations, faith-based groups, academia, the media, Congress, the public, and other stakeholders to build support for U.S. justice and accountability efforts in response to WCGE atrocities;

(7)  J/GCJ uses its expertise to provide guidance and advice and to otherwise support credible atrocity prevention efforts in coordination with other Department elements, other federal departments and agencies, non-governmental organizations and other private sector partners, foreign governments, and international institutions, and seeks to foster a whole-of-government approach to atrocity prevention;

(8)  J/GCJ coordinates with other relevant federal departments and agencies, as appropriate, regarding the deployment of diplomatic, legal, economic, military, and other tools to help facilitate the collection of evidence of WCGE atrocities; the provision of protection and assistance to victims and witnesses of such acts; accountability for those accused of fostering, facilitating, or perpetrating such acts; and reconciliation and the promotion of the rule of law in contexts with legacies of WCGE atrocities;

(9)  J/GCJ manages the War Crimes Rewards Program, which provides financial rewards for information leading to the arrest, capture, or conviction of foreign nationals indicted for atrocity crimes.  (see 2 FAM 940 – 944); and

(10)  J/GCJ designs, implements, monitors, and evaluates its own foreign assistance programs to promote justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities and to establish and assist transitional justice mechanisms; and it provides advice and assistance to other bureaus, offices, and agencies on the promotion of justice and accountability for WCGE atrocities and on transitional justice through their policies and programs.

1 FAM 045.8-3  J/GCJ Authorities

(CT:ORG-589;   09-30-2021)

J/GCJ Authorities include but are not limited to:

(1)  2 FAM 940 – 944 – Payment and Rewards for Information Relating to War Crimes (War Crimes Rewards Program);

(2)  22 U.S.C. 2708, et seq. – State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956, Department of State Rewards Program;

(3)  22 U.S.C. 9801, et seq. – Global Fragility Act of 2019;

(4)  22 U.S.C. 2151, et seq. – Foreign Assistance Act of 1961;

(5)  22 U.S.C. 2151n – Human Rights and Development Assistance;

(6)  22 U.S.C. 2304 – Human Rights and Security Assistance;

(7)  The annual Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, including Sec. 7031(c), Anti-Kleptocracy and Human Rights (included since 2008);

(8)  22 U.S.C. 8213 – Investigations of Violations of International Humanitarian Law;

(9)  Public Law 114-328, Sec. 1261, et seq. – Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act of 2016;

(10) Public Law 115-441 – Elie Wiesel Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act of 2018;

(11) 22 U.S.C. 8791 – Imposition of Sanctions with Respect to Certain Persons who are Responsible for or Complicit in Human Rights Abuses Committed Against Citizens of Syria or Their Family Members;

(12) Public Law 116-92, Sec. 7401, et seq. – Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act of 2019;

(13) 22 U.S.C. 7421, et seq. – American Servicemembers’ Protection Act of 2002, as amended, including the Dodd Amendment (22 U.S.C. 7433);

(14) Executive Order 13818 – Blocking the Property of Persons Involved in Serious Human Rights Abuse or Corruption (December 21, 2017);

(15) Public Law 115-68 – Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017; and

(16) Executive Order 13729 – A Comprehensive Approach to Atrocity Prevention and Response (May 18, 2016), country-specific executive orders, and other executive actions.

1 FAM 046  UNDER SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS (R)

1 FAM 046.1  Responsibilities

(CT:ORG-406;   01-31-2017)

The Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R):

(1)  Reports directly to the Secretary of State (S);

(2)  Serves as Secretary of State as designated by Executive Order 13251 (67 FR 1599), dated December 28, 2001;

(3)  Serves as the principal adviser to the Secretary and Deputy Secretaries on matters of public diplomacy and public affairs and directs formulation of and/or coordinates Department policies and positions on public diplomacy and public affairs issues.  The Under Secretary supervises the execution of such policies within the Department of State and represents the Department on such matters with other agencies of the U.S. Government, and in pursuing these functions, coordinates, as appropriate, with the other Under Secretaries of State;

(4)  Provides policy direction and coordination for the Department in the following areas:

(a)  International educational, academic and professional exchange policy;

(b)  International cultural diplomacy;

(c)  International information policy;

(d)  Public affairs;

(e)  Foreign public opinion; and

(f)   U.S. Government international civilian broadcasting;

(5)  Serves as the key adviser to the Secretary on all facets of public diplomacy resources, including the allocation of such resources to the regional and functional bureaus as well as the oversight of their use in those bureaus and in the bureaus and offices directly under R;

(6)  For designated areas of responsibility, directs the negotiation and implementation of agreements with foreign countries and oversees related diplomatic efforts;

(7)  Assists the Secretary in representing the United States at international meetings, on special missions, in performing other representational assignments, and in presenting the Department's position before Congressional committees;

(8)  Assists the Secretary, on request, in representing the Department at interdepartmental meetings, including Cabinet councils, and in providing policy advice to the Secretary on matters under consideration by these groups;

(9)  Undertakes additional duties as may be requested by the Secretary or Deputy Secretaries;

(10) Has substantive and coordinating responsibility for 1 FAM 046, Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R); and

(11) Negotiates, concludes, and terminates treaties and other international agreements and authorizes other U.S. Government officials to do so under the Department’s Circular 175 procedure.

1 FAM 046.2  Management Oversight

(CT:ORG-406;   01-31-2017)

a. The following Department of State units report directly to the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R):

(1)  Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA);

(2)  Bureau of Public Affairs (PA);

(3)  Bureau of International Information Programs (IIP);

(4)  Office of Policy, Planning and Resources (R/PPR); and

(5)  Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications (R/CSCC).

b. The Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R) coordinates the human and financial resources that support the Department’s Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs programs and activities. Any proposals or plans related to resource allocations for Department of State units that report directly to the Under Secretary must be routed through the Office of the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R) for review and clearance.  This does not supersede or abrogate resource responsibilities under 1 FAM 044 (M) and 1 FAM 620 (BP).

1 FAM 046.3  Authorities

(CT:ORG-406;   01-31-2017)

The following authorities apply:

(1)  The State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956, as amended (Public Law 84-885; 22 U.S.C. 2651a, et seq.);

(2)  Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 311 (“Negotiation, Conclusion, and Termination of Treaties and Other International Agreements”), dated March 28, 2008;

(3)  Presidential Decision Directive/NSC-68, dated April 30, 1999;

(4)  The U.S. Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, as amended (“Smith-Mundt Act”; Public Law 80-402; 22 U.S.C. 1431, et seq.); section 208 (“Zorinsky Amendment”; 22 U.S.C. 1461-1a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986-1987 (Public Law 99-93; 22 U.S.C. 2651 note, et seq.); and section 1333(c) (22 U.S.C. 6552(c)) of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, as amended (“FARRA”; Division G of Public Law 105-277; 22 U.S.C. 6501 note, et seq.);

(5)  Title VIII of the FREEDOM Support Act (Public Law 102-511; 22 U.S.C. 5801 note, et seq.);

(6)  The Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 (Public Law 101-179; 22 U.S.C. 5401 note, et seq.);

(7)  The Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, as amended (“Fulbright-Hays Act”; Public Law 87-256; 22 U.S.C. 2451, et seq.);

(8)  The functions in section 101(a)(15)(J) (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(J)) and section 212(j) (8 U.S.C. 1182(j)) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended (“INA”; Public Law 82-414; 8 U.S.C. 1101, et seq.); and in section 641 (8 U.S.C. 1372) of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (“IIRIRA”; Division C of Public Law 104-208; 8 U.S.C. 1101 note, et seq.);

(9)  The functions in the Act of October 19, 1965 (Public Law 89-259; 22 U.S.C. 2459), delegated to the Secretary of State by Executive Order 12047 (43 Fed. Reg. 13359 (Mar. 27, 1978)) (as amended by Executive Order 12388 (47 Fed. Reg. 46245 (Oct. 14, 1982)));

(10) Those functions in the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act (Title III of Public Law 97-446; 19 U.S.C. 2601, et seq.) delegated to the Secretary of State by Executive Order 12555 (51 Fed. Reg. 8475 (Mar. 10, 1986));

(11) Section 304 (22 U.S.C. 6203) and section 306 (22 U.S.C. 6205) of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994, as amended (Title III of Public Law 103-236; 22 U.S.C. 6201, et seq.);

(12) Department of State Delegation of Authority No. 234, dated October 1, 1999;

(13) Executive Order 13721 (81 Fed. Reg. 14685 (Mar. 14, 2016)), directing the Secretary of State to establish the Global Engagement Center (GEC); and

(14) Other authorities, as appropriate.

1 FAM 046.4  Office of Policy, Planning and Resources (R/PPR)

(CT:ORG-246;   06-07-2011)

The Office of Policy, Planning and Resources (R/PPR):

(1)  Reports to the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R); and

(2)  Is comprised of three staffs:

(a)  Policy and Strategic Planning (R/PPR/P), responsible for management of trans-regional policy issues, interagency liaison, and strategic planning efforts;

(b)  Resources (R/PPR/R), tasked with strategic management of all human and program resources under the authority of the Under Secretary; and

(c)  The Evaluation and Measurement Unit (R/PPR/EMU), charged with design, implementation, and assessment of program evaluation and performance-measurement tools.

1 FAM 046.5  Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications (R/CSCC)

(CT:ORG-246;   06-07-2011)

The Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications (R/CSCC):

(1)  Reports to the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R);

(2)  Takes the lead in coordinating, orienting, and informing the entirety of U.S Government communications activities targeted against violent extremism to audiences abroad, with the goal of using communication tools to reduce radicalization and extremist violence and terrorism; and

(3)  Operates under the broad policy direction of the White House and interagency leadership, and works in close collaboration with the Secretary’s Coordinator for Counterterrorism (S/CT), other Department bureaus, and other U.S. Government agencies.

1 FAM 046.6  Organization

(CT:ORG-280;   08-10-2012)

An organization chart of the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R) is found at 1 FAM Exhibit 046.6.

1 FAM 047 THROUGH 049  UNASSIGNED


1 FAM EXHIBIT 042.2  
UNDER SECRETARY FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH, ENERGY, AND THE ENVIRONMENT (E)

(CT:ORG-551;   06-08-2020)


 


1 FAM EXHIBIT 045.5  
UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE
FOR CIVILIAN SECURITY, DEMOCRACY, AND HUMAN RIGHTS (J)

(CT:ORG-538;   11-13-2019)

Title: J org chart - Description: J org chart

 

 

 

 

1 FAM EXHIBIT 046.6  
UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS (R)

(CT:ORG-460;   07-17-2018)

 

 

 

UNCLASSIFIED (U)