6 FAM 400 
GENERAL SERVICES AND DOMESTIC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

6 FAM 410 

DOMESTIC EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

(CT:GS-202;   03-15-2018)
(Office of Origin:  A/OEM)

6 FAM 411  MISSION

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. Reduce the loss of life, property, and information and ensure protection of the Department’s critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) from all types of events through a comprehensive, risk-based, emergency management program of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.

b. Ensure the continuity of the Department’s domestic operations are sufficient to maintain the Department’s Primary Mission Essential Functions (PMEFs) and Mission Essential Functions (MEFs) in support of the National Essential Functions (NEFs) during a wide range of emergencies, including localized acts of nature, physical attacks, pandemic disease, accidents, or technological attacks, referred to herein as “events.”

6 FAM 412  POLICY

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

It is the Department’s policy to:

(1)  Protect Department personnel and visitors in all its activities and facilities;

(2)  Ensure the continuity of Department PMEFs and MEFs during all hazards, emergencies, or other events that may disrupt normal operations, to include those that impact national security;

(3)  Provide guidelines and support to bureaus and offices for achieving a reliable and effective Domestic Emergency Management Program;

(4)  Ensure coordination with bureaus/offices, other Federal departments and agencies, and State and local governments for delivery of Department services or guidance before, during, and after an event; and

(5)  Ensure that training and exercise opportunities are made available to all Department personnel and that they are aware of their responsibility to become familiar with Department policy and procedures should a hazard or emergency occur at their duty location.

6 FAM 412.1  Applicability

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

Unless otherwise noted, 6 FAM applies to all Department personnel located in domestic facilities.  For the purposes of this chapter, the term “personnel,” includes any individual working for the Department at any domestic facility, except as noted otherwise.

6 FAM 412.2  Scope

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program provides the policy, guiding principles, and management roles and responsibilities for Department-wide domestic emergency preparedness and response, as well as the Department’s Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Program.  The main leads for domestic emergency management and response are as follows:

(1)  The Domestic Emergency Action Committee (DEAC).  See 6 FAM 415.2.

(2)  The Assistant Secretary for Administration (A).  See 6 FAM 416.2.

(3)  The Assistant Secretary for Diplomatic Security (DS).  See 6 FAM 416.3.

(4)  The Director, Office of Emergency Management (A/OEM).  See 6 FAM 415.3.

6 FAM 413  AUTHORITIES

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

a. Federal law:

(1)  Government Organization and Employees—Department Regulations, 5 U.S.C. 301;

(2)  Records Maintained on Individuals, 5 U.S.C. 552a;

(3)  General Authority of Secretary of State, 22 U.S.C. 2581;

(4)  Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, 40 U.S.C. 101 et seq.;

(5)  Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (Public Law 91-596); and

(6)  Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986, as amended (22 U.S.C. 4802 et seq.)

b. Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs), Title:

(1)  29 CFR Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standards;

(2)  29 CFR Part 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters;

(3)  36 CFR Part 1236, Electronic Records Management;

(4)  40 CFR Part 355, Emergency Planning and Notification; and

(5)  41 CFR 102-74.230 to 260, Occupant Emergency Program.

c.  Executive Orders (EOs):

(1)  12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees, dated February 26, 1980;

(2)  13618, Assignment of National Security and Emergency Preparedness Telecommunications Functions, dated April 3, 1984;

(3)  12656, Assignment of Emergency Preparedness Communications Functions, dated July 6, 2012;

(4)  12977, Interagency Security Committee, dated October 19, 1995;

(5)  13251, Providing an Order Of Succession within the Department of State, dated December 28, 2001, and

(6)  13347, Individuals with Disabilities in Emergency Preparedness, dated July 22, 2004.

d. Federal Continuity Directives (FCDs)

(1)  FCD-1, Federal Executive Branch National Continuity Program and Requirement, dated February 2008;

(2)  FCD-2, Federal Executive Branch Mission Essential Function and Primary Mission Essential Function Identification and Submission Process, dated February 2008; and

(3)  Federal Executive Branch Continuity Plan Template, dated 2009.

e. Presidential Decision Directives; PDD-62 - Protection Against Unconventional Threats to the Homeland and Americans Overseas, dated May 22, 1998

f.  Presidential Policy Directive; PPD-8, National Preparedness, dated March 30, 2011

g. National Security Presidential Directive, NSPD-51 – National Continuity Policy, dated May 9, 2007 (also published as HSPD 20)

h. Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPDs):

(1)  HSPD-1, Organization and Operation of the Homeland Security Council, dated October 29, 2001;

(2)  HSPD-3, Homeland Security Advisory System, dated March 11, 2002;

(3)  HSPD-5, Management of Domestic Incidents, dated February 28, 2003;

(4)  HSPD-7, Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protections, dated December 17, 2003;

(5)  HSPD 8, National Preparedness, Annex I, paragraph 44, dated December 4, 2007; and

(6)  HSPD 20, National Continuity Policy, dated May 9, 2007.

i.  National Initiatives:

(1)  National Response Framework (NRF) of January 2008;

(2)  Facility Security Level Determinations for Federal Facilities, January 14, 2008;

(3)  National Communications System (NCS) Directive 3-10, Minimum Requirements for Continuity Communications Capabilities, dated July 25, 2007;

(4)  Critical Infrastructure Protection, the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) of 2009;

(5)  National Incident Management System (National Incident Management System (NIMS), dated December 2008; and

(6)  National Fire Protection Association 1600, “Standard on Disaster/Emergency Management and Business Continuity Programs,” approved December 20, 2006.

j.  See also:

(1)  1 FAM 212.4, Office of Emergency Management;

(2)  5 FAM 420 – Creating Records; and

(3)  6 FAH-2, Facility Emergency Action Plan (FEAP) Handbook.

6 FAM 414  DEFINITIONS

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

Alternate Facility or Site:  A location, other than the normal duty facility or location, used to carry out official activities/functions should the normal location not be available.  It is also sometimes referred to as a relocation site (RS).  (See the term “Relocation Site (RS).”)

American National Standards Institute (ANSI):  The coordinator of the U.S. voluntary standards system; provides a forum where the private and public sectors can cooperatively work together towards the development of consensus on voluntary national standards.

Bureau Emergency Action Plan (BEAP):  A bureau-specific plan that guides bureau leadership through identifying, prioritizing, and performing bureau functions before, during, and after an event that impacts the bureau’s operations.  It also describes actions taken to ensure bureau readiness to continue Mission Essential Functions (MEFs) in the face of a wide range of disruptive events, including the activation of the Bureau Emergency Action Team (BEAT).  The BEAP can be activated by the Bureau’s Assistant Secretary or other designated Bureau leadership.  In the event the Department’s Continuity of Operations (COOP) plan is activated by either the President or the Secretary of State, the BEAP also addresses how the bureau supports the Department’s Emergency Relocation Group (ERG) during such an event.  The BEAP provides guidance for how a bureau continues to perform its essential functions (EFs) as part of an impending COOP or continuity of government (COG) event or an event that compromises the bureau’s EFs.  (See the term “Continuity of Operations (COOP).”)

Bureau Emergency Action Team (BEAT):  The designated bureau emergency personnel that may be required to remain at or report to work or to an alternate location to ensure bureau Essential Functions (MEFs) continue during emergency situations.  The BEAT may be activated as the sole support to a bureau COOP plan activation or activated in support of the Department’s ERG.  (See the term “Emergency Personnel.”)

Bureau Essential Functions (EFs):  The bureau functions that are performed in direct support of the Department’s MEFs are its EFs.  These functions must be continuous or be resumed within 12-72 hours of notification of an event.  The bureau must be able to perform these functions for 30 days or until normal operations can be resumed.  During an event that requires the activation of the BEAP, performance of these functions shall be the primary responsibility of the Bureau’s continuity personnel (i.e., BEAT members).

Bureau Support Functions:  The bureau functions that do not directly support MEFs but are still deemed critical bureau functions.  These functions should be resumed as soon as possible.  If applicable, the bureau should be able to perform these functions for 30 days or until normal operations can be resumed, as long as performance of these functions does not impede the performance of the EFs.  During an event that requires the activation of the BEAP, performance of these functions shall be the secondary responsibility of the Bureau’s continuity personnel.

Catastrophic Emergency:  Any incident, regardless of location, that results in extraordinary levels of mass casualties, damage, or disruption severely affecting the U.S. population, infrastructure, environment, economy, or government functions.

Communications:  Voice, video, and data capabilities that enable the leadership and staff to conduct the Primary Missions Essential Functions (PMEFs), MEFs of the Department, and EFs of a Bureau.

Communications Center:  A site that provides communications support (e.g., secure and non-secure telephone, computer, radio, etc.) to relay information regarding a potential or an ongoing domestic emergency impacting Department facilities in the National Capital Region (NCR) to appropriate parties, bureaus/offices, and response teams within the Department; as well as involved local, State, or other Federal departments/agencies.  (See 6 FAM 415.3-2 paragraph a.(2).)

Contingency Plan:  A plan used for emergency response, backup operations, and post-disaster recovery to ensure the availability of critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) and to facilitate the continuity requirements of the Department’s COOP Plan, FEAPs, and BEAPs.

Continuity Capability:  The ability of an organization to continue performance of essential functions, using COOP, continuity of government (COG), or enduring constitutional government (ECG) programs and integrated, day-to-day operations with a primary goal of ensuring the preservation of our form of government under the Constitution and the continuing performance of National Essential Functions (NEFs) under all conditions.  Built from the foundation of continuity planning and continuity program management, the key pillars of continuity capability are Leadership, Staff, Communications, and Facilities.

Continuity Coordinator:  An executive branch department or agency representative, selected from the Assistant Secretary (or equivalent) level, who is responsible for ensuring the effectiveness and survivability of the organization’s continuity capability.  The Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Administration holds this position for the Department of State.  (See 1 FAM 211.2 paragraph n).

Continuity of Government (COG):  The executive branch’s coordinated effort to ensure that NEFs continue to be performed during a catastrophic emergency.

Continuity of Operations (COOP):  An effort within individual departments and agencies, as well as their sub-components, to ensure PMEFs continue to be performed during a wide range of emergencies, including localized acts of nature, accidents, and technological or attack-related emergencies.  The Department’s COOP Plan is activated only upon decision of either the President or the Secretary of State.

COOP Event:  Any event that otherwise prevents normal government operations from continuing and causes a department or agency to relocate operations to a relocation site to assure continuance of its PMEFs and/or MEFs.

Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR):  CIKR includes the people, information, facilities, equipment, operations, and activities that support the Department’s PMEFs.

Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP):  An effort, emanating from HSPD-7 - Critical Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protections and the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP), to ensure the security of vulnerable and interconnected infrastructures of the United States (i.e., CIKR).  This effort recognizes certain parts of the national infrastructure as critical to the national and economic security of the United States and the well-being of its citizenry, and the steps required to protect it.

Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Plan:  The plan identifies and outlines protection measures for CIKR that are vital to the Department’s PMEFs and to national security.

Defend-In-Place (DIP):  A situation where it may be necessary for building occupants to remain where they are, should leaving the area or floor pose a threat.  This may include locking office doors and turning out lights (if not automatic) to give the appearance of an empty office, or sealing around office doors and windows to prevent the transfer of smoke into the office while waiting for rescue from emergency response personnel.  A direction to DIP may occur with little or no warning.

Delegation of Authority:  The assignment of policy determination and decision making authorities at the Department, bureau, office, facility, and all other organizational locations.  Generally, delegations of authority in a COOP plan or a BEAP will be written to take effect when normal channels of direction are disrupted and terminate when these channels have resumed.

NOTE:  All “Delegations of Authority” in the Department’s COOP Plan or in an individual BEAP must have clearance from Office of the Legal Adviser’s Office of Management (L/M).

Department Emergency Action Plan (DEAP):  The comprehensive framework for an all-hazards approach to domestic emergency response.  It consists of a core document that explains in detail Department policy and guidance for domestic response, domestic roles and responsibilities, and planning requirements for domestic preparedness both at the Department and national levels to ensure continuation of the Department’s PMEFs and MEFs in support of the NEFs under all conditions.

Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO):  The DASHO formulates policy and provides guidance regarding employee occupational health and safety issues; planning and implementation of procedures for nuclear, biological, and chemical countermeasures; mail and building safety; and coordinating interdepartmental actions in this area.  The Department’s Medical Director holds this position.  (See 16 FAM 600.)

Designated Official (DO):  The highest ranking resident official of the primary occupant Federal department or agency, or, alternatively, a resident in the facility who is selected by mutual agreement of resident department and agency officials.  For General Services Administration (GSA)-owned and -leased facilities this is defined in Title 41 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 102-71.20.

Domestic Emergency Action Committee (DEAC):  The DEAC is the senior decision-making body responsible for ensuring the Department is prepared for all domestic security threats, emergencies, or other events which may affect the safety and welfare of the Department’s CIKR.

Devolution:  The capability to transfer authority and responsibility for essential functions from a department’s/agency’s primary operating staff and facilities to other department/agency personnel and facilities, and to sustain that operational capability for an extended period.

Emergency:  An unforeseen combination of circumstances, or the resulting state, that calls for immediate action.  Emergencies may include a fire, explosion, discovery of an explosive device, severe weather, chemical or biological exposure or threat, hostage situation, or physical threat to building occupants or visitors, terrorist attack, or other national security emergency.

Emergency Action Committee (EAC):  A bureau’s leadership body for planning for and responding to emergency situations.  This group coordinates the bureau’s activities during each phase of the BEAP and is responsible for ensuring the BEAP remains current and accurate.  Prior to an emergency, the bureau must select individuals who currently occupy or can successfully perform the duties of the following positions:

(1)  EAC Chair (Assistant Secretary or equivalent)

(2)  Executive Director and/or Deputy

(3)  Bureau BEAP Coordinator

(4)  Bureau CENS Administrator

(5)  Bureau System Administrator

(6)  Bureau Security Officer

(7)  Bureau General Services Officer

(8)  Bureau HR Representative

(9)  Bureau Financial Officer

(10) Bureau Vital Records Coordinator

Emergency Action Plan (EAP):  A specific plan used to describe the actions taken to ensure the safety of Department personnel and ability for all bureaus, offices, or facilities to continue essential functions.

Emergency Management:  Organized efforts to mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an emergency.

Emergency Management Center (EMC):  The Department’s central location for managing emergencies impacting its domestic facilities.  It is used to coordinate response to, recovery from, and relay information about a domestic emergency that impacts any part of the Department.  The Department’s EMC is managed by A/OEM and is located in the Harry S Truman Building (HST), Room B-235B.

Emergency Operating Records:  One type of vital records.  (See the term “Vital Records.”)  These records are essential to the continued functioning or reconstitution of an organization during and after an emergency.  They include emergency plans and directive(s), orders of succession, delegations of authority, staffing assignments, selected program records needed to continue the most critical agency operations, as well as related policy and procedural records that assist agency staff in conducting operations under emergency conditions and for resuming normal operations after an emergency.

Emergency Personnel:  Pre-identified domestic personnel responsible for performing mission essential functions at a relocation site in support of bureau or Department continuity.  (See the terms “Bureau Emergency Action Team (BEAT)” and “Emergency Relocation Group (ERG).”)

Emergency Relocation Group (ERG): The Department’s senior management personnel from bureaus and offices designated to support the Department’s Continuity Programs.  The President and/or Secretary of State, or their designees, may activate ERG members during emergencies involving national security, extended emergencies, or other unique situations.  (See the term “Emergency Personnel.”)

Emergency Response Staff Program:  A program intended to prepare Department emergency response staff to respond to domestic emergencies that impact the Department. 

Emergency Response Team (ERT):  The personnel from the Department, or from a local, State, or other Federal department or agency, trained to perform a specific task during a particular phase of emergency response.  Within the Department, an emergency response team consists of an Incident Commander (IC) and the emergency response staff.  (See 6 FAM 417.5.)

Enduring Constitutional Government (ECG):  A cooperative effort among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the Federal Government, coordinated by the President, as a matter of comity with respect to the legislative and judicial branches and with proper respect for the constitutional separation of powers among the branches, to preserve the constitutional framework under which the nation is governed and the capability of all three branches of government to execute constitutional responsibilities and provide for orderly succession, appropriate transition of leadership, and interoperability and support of NEFs during a catastrophic emergency.

ePrepare:  A State Department Web site, managed by A/OEM, that serves as a single point for Department personnel to access consolidated emergency preparedness information for both the office and home.

Essential Functions:  The critical activities performed by departments and agencies in the Federal Government.  There are three categories of essential functions:  NEFs, PMEFs, and MEFs.

Evacuation:  An action taken that requires all persons in a Department facility to leave the facility and move to a safe area.  Evacuations are generally ordered under emergency conditions and may occur with little or no warning.  Evacuations may be local (e.g., evacuation of a building) or regional (e.g., evacuation of a city or an area).

Facility Emergency Action Plan (FEAP):  A building-specific emergency action plan used to describe actions taken, across a wide range of domestic emergencies, to ensure the safety of Department personnel and visitors, and to protect property in buildings where the Department occupies space.  (A FEAP is sometimes known as an OEP.  See the term “Occupant Emergency Plan (OEP).”)

Facility Security Committee (FSC):  A committee, consisting of representatives of all Federal tenants in the facility, which is generally responsible for identifying building-specific security issues.  For the purposes of a FEAP, the FSC approves the implementation of emergency management measures and practices based on the current risk assessments developed from the analysis of the current threat and vulnerability assessments.  The Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) must approve any change in any security measure, policy, or practice before the FSC can implement it.

Incident Command System (ICS):  A standardized, on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept.  ICS, required by HSPD-5 and delineated in the National Incident Management System (NIMS), is based upon a flexible, scalable response organization providing a common framework within which people can work together effectively.  ICS has been summarized as a "first-on-scene" structure; that is, where the first person on scene is in charge until the incident is resolved or responsibility is transferred to a more-qualified individual.

Incident Commander (IC):  The person in charge of all emergency response activities during an emergency.

Incident Management Team (IMT):  The Department body that supports and manages all Department level emergency response efforts during a domestic emergency that impacts the Department.

Internal Relocation:  An action taken where Department personnel and visitors are directed to remain within a building but move to a previously unidentified location of away from the danger (e.g., a conference room or auditorium on the opposite side where the danger is occurring) as a safety precaution because of outside threats.  A direction to move to an internal location may occur with little or no warning.

Legal and Financial Rights Records:  A second type of vital records.  (See the term “Vital Records.”)  These records are essential to protect the legal and financial rights of the Government and of the individuals directly affected by its activities.  They include, but are not limited to, accounts receivable records, Social Security records, payroll records, retirement records, insurance records.  These records are also referred to as “rights and interests” records.

Liaison Officer (LOFR):  A subject matter expert drawn from bureaus/offices already engaged in the Department’s domestic emergency response effort but who need not be from the bureau/office leading the IMT.  From their assigned national command structure element (e.g., FEMA’s National Response Coordination Center (NRCC), the National Operations Center (NOC), etc.), LOFRs provide the Executive Secretary’s Crisis Management Support unit (S/ES-O/CMS) with periodic situation reports for inclusion, as appropriate, in briefing materials for the Secretary and Department Principals; or for dissemination, as appropriate, to other bureaus/offices or to U.S. missions overseas.  All LOFRs must be trained on the NRF and NIMS per FEMA standards and LOFRs assigned to the NOC must have Top Secret clearances.

Mission Assurance:  The process carried out at a facility or designated organization to identify CIKR, the assets that support essential functions, and to ensure readiness to respond to threats to those assets.  The Department also uses the term “Emergency Management” as a synonym.

Mission Essential Functions (MEFs):  Those U.S. Government functions that must be performed to support or implement the performance of PMEFs before, during, and after an emergency.  MEFs are identified from the activities performed by the Department’s bureaus and offices.

National Continuity Coordinator (NCC):  The person responsible for coordinating the development and implementation of Federal continuity policies, which includes establishing NEFs and continuity requirements for all executive departments and agencies.  The NCC provides guidance for State, local, territorial, and tribal governments, as well as private sector organizations.  The NCC ensures that there is a comprehensive and integrated national continuity program that will enable a more rapid and effective response to and recovery from a national emergency.  The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism (APHS/CT) holds this position.

National Essential Functions (NEFs):  Those functions and overarching responsibilities of the Federal Government that the President and national leadership will focus on to lead and sustain the nation during a catastrophic emergency and that must be supported through continuity capabilities.

National Incident Management System (NIMS):  A systematic, proactive approach to guide departments and agencies at all levels of government, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to work seamlessly to prevent, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate the effects of incidents, regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity, to reduce the loss of life and property and harm to the environment.  For additional information on this document, contact A/OEM.

National Fire Protection Association (NFPA):  The world's leading advocate for fire prevention and an authoritative source on public safety.

National Response Framework (NRF):  The guiding principles enabling all levels of domestic response partners to prepare for and provide a unified response to disasters and emergencies.  Building on the NIMS, as well as ICS standardization, the NRF's coordinating structures are always in effect for implementation at any level and at any time for local, State, and national emergency or disaster response.  For additional information on this document, contact A/OEM.

Occupant Emergency Plan (OEP):  The term “Occupant Emergency Plan” is used by other organizations instead of the term “Facility Emergency Action Plan.”  (See the term “Facility Emergency Action Plan (FEAP).”)

Order of Succession:  Provisions for the assumption of duties of senior Department officials during an emergency in the event that any of those officials are unavailable to perform their duties. Executive Order 13251 dated December 28, 2001 provides an Order of Succession within the Department for the Office of Secretary of State.  

    NOTE:  All “Orders of Succession” in the Department’s COOP Plan or in an individual BEAP must have clearance from Office of the Legal Adviser’s Office of Management (L/M).

Primary Mission Essential Functions (PMEFs):  Those department and agency essential functions, validated by the NCC, which must be accomplished to support the performance of NEFs before, during, and after an emergency.  PMEFs must be available within 12 hours of an emergency and sustainable for 30 days, or until operations can be resumed at either the original location or a new one.  These activities include formulation and implementation of foreign policy; maintenance of diplomatic and consular relations, and essential consular functions; reporting and advising on relevant conditions overseas; and supporting other cabinet departments and agencies (e.g., Defense, Treasury, Commerce, and Justice).

Reconstitution:  The process by which personnel resume normal operations from the original operating facility or from a replacement location.

Relocation Site (RS):  A location identified to support the Department’s Emergency Relocation Group (ERG) or a bureau’s Bureau Emergency Action Team (BEAT).  Some RSs are classified to ensure team safety and to maintain site integrity.  It can also be referred to as an alternate facility or site.  (See the term “Alternate Facility or Site.”)

Risk Assessment:  A method to calculate risk.  Risk is the result of three factors:

(1)  The impact or consequences of an undesirable event that causes the loss of or damage to a Department asset (i.e., people, information, equipment, facilities, activities, and operations);

(2)  The threat or likelihood that undesirable event will occur; and

(3)  All vulnerabilities associated with that undesirable event.

Shelter-In-Place (SIP):  An action taken to cause building occupants to move from their current location (e.g., their office) to previously designated locations within a building as a safety precaution, while a dangerous situation is impacting the outside perimeter of the building.  A direction to SIP may occur with little or no warning.

Unified Command (UC):  A structure that brings together the "ICs" of all major organizations involved in the incident to coordinate an effective response, while at the same time allowing the IC’s organizational entities to carry out their own jurisdictional responsibilities.  While UC makeup for a specific incident is determined on a case-by-case basis, makeup of the UC may change as the incident progresses; to account for changes in the situation (e.g., transitions out of emergency response and into long-term cleanup).  Linking the various entities responding to the incident, UC is responsible for overall management of the incident (unlike when there is a single IC who is solely responsible for an event) and provides a forum for UC entities to make consensus decisions.

Unified Command Representative:  A representative from one of the organizations involved in and responding to an incident.  UC representatives bring their authorities to the UC, as well as the resources to carry out their responsibilities.  Members in a UC have a responsibility to the UC, but do not relinquish their department/agency authority, responsibility, or accountability.  To be a UC representative, the representative’s organization must:

(1)  Have jurisdictional authority or functional responsibility for the incident under a law or ordinance;

(2)  Have an area of responsibility that is affected by the incident or response operations;

(3)  Be specifically charged with commanding, coordinating, or managing a major aspect of the response; and

(4)  Have the resources to support participation in the response organization.

Vital Records:  Information systems and applications, electronic and hardcopy documents, references, and records needed to support PMEFs and MEFs during a continuity event.  The two basic categories of vital records are

(1)  Emergency operating records; and

(2)  Legal and financial rights records.

6 FAM 415  DEPARTMENT LEVEL PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

6 FAM 415.1  Under Secretary for Management (M)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the Under Secretary for Management (M) in the Domestic Emergency Management Program include:

(1)  Acting as the Senior Department official responsible for domestic emergency management; and

(2)  Serving as chair of the DEAC.

6 FAM 415.2  Domestic Emergency Action Committee (DEAC) and Working Groups

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. The DEAC, chaired by M, is the Department’s senior decision-making body with regard to domestic emergency management.  DEAC membership, as well as its roles and responsibilities, are outlined in the DEAC Charter, which is approved by M and available on A/OEM’s ePrepare Web site.  DEAC roles and responsibilities include ensuring:

(1)  The Department is prepared for all domestic emergencies or undesirable events and effectively responds to those which impact the Department’s domestic CIKR;

(2)  The requirements of National Preparedness programs, embodied in Presidential and national directives, are met;

(3)  The Department, as a cabinet agency operating under the NRF and the NIMS, is capable of responding to incidents impacting or involving the United States and the Department’s PMEFs continue to be performed during a wide-range of domestic emergencies; and

(4)  All Department elements and personnel understand their domestic emergency preparedness roles and responsibilities, including risk management-, response-, and security-related functions; and how to quickly, safely, and effectively respond to emergencies impacting the Department or the United States.

b. The DEAC Working Groups are comprised of representatives assigned by bureaus and offices.  They have the appropriate subject matter expertise and authority to address any issues.  The membership of each DEAC Working Group, as well as their roles and responsibilities, are outlined in the DEAC Charter:

(1)  There are two working groups: the Departmental Protective Functions (DPF) Working Group and the NRF Functions (NRFF) Working Group.  The DPF Working Group addresses preparedness issues, while the NRFF Working Group addresses NRF responsibilities;

(2)  Each working group is comprised of members with the appropriate expertise and authority for the specific working group; and

(3)  The working groups meet as directed by the Working Group Chair (Director, A/OEM) and report to the DEAC in coordination with the DEAC Executive Secretary.

6 FAM 415.3  Director, Office of Emergency Management (A/OEM)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the A/OEM Director in the Domestic Emergency Management Program include:

(1)  Under DEAC direction, ensuring all Department personnel appropriately respond to, and assist in recovery from, an emergency at any of the Department’s domestic facilities by:

(a)  Implementing DEAC policies throughout the Department;

(b)  Developing consistent and effective plans, procedures, and capabilities (e.g., Continuity of Operations (COOP) Plan, Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Plan, Department Emergency Action Plan (DEAP), Facility Emergency Action Plan (FEAP), and Bureau Emergency Action Plan (BEAP)) for use throughout the Department; and

(c)  Conducting a domestic exercise program, where Department personnel participation is mandatory, to ensure Department personnel know what to do before, during, and after a major domestic emergency.

(2)  Coordinating domestic emergency management and continuity activities throughout the Department.  This coordination includes ensuring:

(a)  The Domestic Emergency Management Program is in full compliance with the NRF and the NIMS, as required by national preparedness policy (e.g., HSPD-5);

(b)  The Department accomplishes its internal domestic preparedness responsibilities for CIP, in accordance with HSPD-7 and the NIPP;

(c)  National preparedness efforts, including for plans, organization, equipment, training, and exercises, are attained as provided in PPD-8; and

(d)  Consistent and effective emergency management and continuity policies, procedures, and capabilities are implemented Department-wide.

(3)  Chairing both DEAC Working Groups (i.e., the DPF and NRPF Working Groups) and providing support to each, as well as to the DEAC.  This support includes:

(a)  Records keeping and meeting schedules;

(b)  Advising and making recommendations to the DEAC regarding policies and procedures to ensure a Department-wide domestic emergency preparedness capability is attained and maintained; and

(c)  Supporting emergency management tasks outlined by the DEAC and in the personnel management of the DEAC Working Groups.

(4)  Supporting the Continuity Coordinator.

(5)  Serving as the Domestic Emergency Coordinator (DEC–see 6 FAM 415.3-1) and, as such, ensuring the Department applies resources, response, and recovery activities for any domestic emergency, except for all Law Enforcement/Security responsibilities pursuant to the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986, as amended (22 U.S.C. 4802 et seq.), where the Assistant Secretary for DS has jurisdiction and oversight authority (see 6 FAM 416.3 paragraph (3)).

6 FAM 415.3-1  Domestic Emergency Coordinator (DEC)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The DEC is responsible, under the authority of the Assistant Secretary for Administration (A), for coordinating domestic emergency management and continuity program capabilities and for coordinating response to and recovery from any domestic emergency.  The order of succession for the DEC is as follows:

(1)  Director, Office of Emergency Management (A/OEM);

(2)  Division Chief, Planning and Preparedness Division (A/OEM/PPD);

(3)  Division Chief, Diplomatic Continuity Programs Division (A/OEM/DCP); and

(4)  Director, Office of Operations (A/OPR).

6 FAM 415.3-2  The Emergency Management Center (EMC)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. The EMC, located in the Harry S Truman (HST) building, was established to support incident management during domestic emergencies that impact the Department according to HSPD-5 and the NIMS.  In such emergencies, the EMC:

(1)  Is the primary location where a domestic incident management team (IMT) coordinates:

(a)  Domestic emergency management with senior Department officials and the Operations Center; and

(b)  With all emergency response teams, whether Department-affiliated or from local, State, or other Federal departments and agencies.

(2)  Is a communications center that relays pertinent information regarding domestic emergencies, to:

(a)  Appropriate parties within the Department, including the Department’s Operations Center and Public Affairs personnel;

(b)  Bureaus/offices, as well as emergency response staff, in the National Capital Region (NCR) via the Radio Distribution Program; and

(c)  Local, State, or other Federal departments and agencies.

b. The A/OEM/PPD Division Chief maintains and operates the EMC, and an alternate EMC, to coordinate domestic incident management according to HSPD-5 and the NIMS.  EMC watch staff responsibilities include the following, except for all Law Enforcement/Security responsibilities as provided in 6 FAM 416.3 paragraph (3):

(1)  Monitoring emergency response to events that threaten the security or safety of the Department’s domestic personnel and facilities; alerting/briefing senior Department officials, appropriate bureaus and offices, and the Department’s Operations Center and Security Control Center (SCC); and coordinating follow-up actions, as necessary;

(2)  Distributing advisories and alerts throughout the Department regarding impending or ongoing domestic emergencies;

(3)  Functioning as the Department’s point of contact for interagency and partner organizations’ exchange of domestic emergency-related information;

(4)  Facilitating incident management;

(5)  Consolidating bureau/office accountability during an emergency;

(6)  Coordinating, through the IMT, implementation of FEAPs and BEAPs with bureaus and offices within the Department and with local authorities; and

(7)  Providing a site for training, exercising, and briefing Department personnel in domestic emergency procedures and policies.

6 FAM 415.3-3  Incident Management Team (IMT)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. The IMT is the Departmental body that supports and manages all emergency response efforts during a domestic emergency that impacts, or has the potential to impact, Department personnel or facilities.  In the event of domestic incidents having a potential impact on Department personnel or facilities within the United States, the Executive Secretary or M directs the A Bureau to form an IMT to coordinate the Department’s internal preparedness and response, when deemed necessary.  The Executive Secretary may also direct a Task Force to manage international issues or issues with diplomats/embassies in the United States, when deemed necessary.  The IMT coordinates with senior staff, the Operations Center, and the SCC in tracking and reporting the emergency.  Also, as circumstances require and in consultation with M, the Executive Secretary directs other bureaus and offices to participate in the IMT or otherwise support its internal preparedness and response mission.

b. Once activated, IMT responsibilities include:

(1)  Activating appropriate elements of the DEAP, including COOP and Continuity of Government (COG) planning, Department facility and personnel protection, and communications;

(2)  Managing the Department’s response to events that affect Department personnel and facilities;

(3)  In absence of a Task Force, coordinating with the Executive Secretary’s Crisis Management Support unit (S/ES-O/CMS) to assign appropriate Liaison Officers (LOFRs) to physically relocate to national command structure elements (e.g., Joint Field Offices (JFOs), FEMA’s NRCC, the NOC, and the Interagency Plans Team (co-located at the NOC)); and

(4)  Providing S/ES-O/CMS periodic situation reports (SITREPs) for incorporation into internal reports to the Secretary and for ALDACS and notices, as required.

c.  The IMT operates according to NIMS and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols and is organized according to the ICS as follows:

(1)  Incident Commander (IC);

(2)  Operations Section;

(3)  Planning Section;

(4)  Logistic Section;

(5)  Finance and Administration Section; and

(6)  Command Staff, including:

(a)  Public Affairs;

(b)  Safety Officer;

(c)  Liaison Officers (LOFRs);

(d)  Department bureau and office representatives appropriate to incident; and

(e)  Others (appropriate to the incident).

d. The nature of a domestic incident determines staffing for an IMT or Task Force.  Each is headed by a “lead bureau/office” reinforced by personnel from “supporting bureaus/offices,” as required for the specific emergency.  The “lead bureau/office” works with S/ES-O/CMS staff and/or A/OEM, as required, to develop the IMT/Task Force staffing rosters appropriate to the emergency at hand.  For the following emergencies, the listed bureau/office is designated the “lead bureau/office”.  If time permits, the “lead bureau/office” for other emergencies is determined through discussion between current “lead bureau/offices” or, in an emergency, A/OEM designates a temporary “lead bureau/office” until otherwise directed by M or the designated “lead bureau/offices.”

(1)  Terrorist Incident–CT;

(2)  Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Terrorist Incident (including biological attacks)–CT and ISN;

(3)  Terrorist Incident at a Department of State Facility–DS;

(4)  Natural Disasters (including non-terror emergencies)–A;

(5)  Non-Terrorist Health Emergencies (e.g., pandemics, accidental biological releases, and nuclear accidents)–OES (if pandemic flu, OES/IHB); and

(6)  Cyber Incidents–S/CCI.

e. The IMT manages all response efforts across the Department for internal domestic emergencies.  It also provides requested support and coordinates any actions with on-scene Department, local, State, tribal, regional, and/or Federal entities, as well as with the Operations Center, as appropriate.  IMT responsibilities include:

(1)  Implementing integrated, compatible domestic emergency response plans and procedures;

(2)  Working directly with the Department’s representative on site, including Department representatives who are members of the onsite Unified Command (UC);

(3)  Calling on and directing the use of functional expertise across the Department nationwide;

(4)  Mobilizing resources and activating funding, as authorized;

(5)  Acting as an event advisor and providing decision support, via the Operations Center, to the Secretary;

(6)  Briefing executive leadership on the status of domestic emergencies being monitored; and

(7)  Providing overall enterprise-wide situational awareness of a domestic emergency.

f.  The responsible bureau or office, as designated in 6 FAM 415.3-3 d, activates the IMT and assembles in the EMC, when the following tripwires occur:

(1)  There is a potential threat to the life or safety of Department personnel (based on initial investigation by DS);

(2)  An emergency or potential emergency involves non-Department of State security or emergency responders (e.g., local law enforcement, fire response, EOD, ATF, FBI, or JTTF); and

(3)  The incident involves possible disruption of operations at a Department occupied domestic facility (i.e., either a full or partial evacuation or a temporary shutdown/closure of the facility).

g. In emergencies involving imminent life/safety, the IMT may make unilateral decisions to protect Department personnel and visitors.

6 FAM 415.3-4  Liaison Officer (LOFR)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. A LOFR is a subject matter expert drawn from bureaus/offices already engaged in the Department’s domestic emergency response effort.  But they need not be from the bureau/office leading the IMT.  LOFRs are assigned somewhere in the national command structure (e.g., FEMA’s NRCC, the Interagency Planning Cell of the NOC, etc.).

b. As the lead for domestic disasters, A/OEM coordinates with other entities within the Department to provide the required liaison officer(s).  When personnel and/or subject matter expertise requirements exceed the ability of A/OEM to comply, the Executive Secretary identifies LOFRs for assignment.

c.  From his or her assigned national command structure element, a LOFR provides the S/ES-O/CMS with periodic situation reports for inclusion, as appropriate, in briefing materials for the Secretary and Department Principals; or for dissemination, as appropriate, to other bureaus/offices or to U.S. missions overseas.

d. All LOFRs must be trained on the NRF and NIMS per FEMA standards and LOFRs assigned to the NOC must have Top Secret clearances.

6 FAM 415.3-5  International Coordination Support

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

a. When the Department responds to a domestic incident under the NRF, it is a supporting agency for the overall national level response, but supports the emergency support functions (ESFs) by playing the lead foreign policy role and managing the international aspects of a domestic incident.  As such, the Department is the “Coordinating Agency” for the NRF’s International Coordination Support Annex.  In addition, the Department has two other primary responsibilities:

(1)  Meeting the preparedness, response, and recovery needs of Department domestic personnel and facilities affected by an event; and

(2)  Providing personnel as required to work in the Interagency arena at national and local levels.

b. The following table provides a cross reference between each ESF, the lead Federal department/agency, and the potential bureaus/offices associated with that ESF.

Emergency Support Functions (ESF)

Coordinating Agency (Lead)

Potential Bureau/Office Associated with ESF

ESF 1 –Transportation

DOT

EB, PM, IO, OES, L, Regional Bureaus, and CA

Role: responsible for the international implications of actions that support airspace and maritime protection efforts.

ESF 2 – Communications

DHS/NCS

IRM, EB, INR, INL, PM, DS, and Regional Bureaus

Role: facilitates international preparedness, protection, and mitigation efforts related to communications and information technology (IT) infrastructure protection, working closely with DHS and others during communications and cyber-related incident response efforts.

ESF 3 – Public Works and Engineering

DOD/USACE

WHA, Other Regional Bureaus, and A

Role: coordinates, as requested, any international public works and related infrastructure support assistance with appropriate Federal departments and agencies on identification and movement to the U.S. of needed technical assistance, engineering expertise, and construction management resources.

ESF 4 – Firefighting

USDA/Forest Service

WHA, Other Regional Bureaus, and CA

Role: coordinates cross-border firefighting efforts and mass casualty care, with DHS border agencies, and identification and movement to the U.S. of assets and resources for firefighting.  The Department also facilitates cross-border passport/visa requirements.

ESF 5 – Emergency Management

FEMA

A, DS, HR, and CGFS

Role: responsible for protection of Department personnel and facilities, and providing support to ESF 5 and primary agencies via mission assignments as requested by DHS/FEMA.

ESF 6 – Mass Care, Housing and Human Services

FEMA

Regional Bureaus, DS, USAID/OFDA, CA, EB, and OES

Role: responsible for liaising with foreign embassies/consulates and local governments to enable consular assistance to their nationals in the U.S.

ESF 7 – Logistics Management and Resource Support

GSA and FEMA

A, PM, HR, Regional Bureaus, and IO

Role: provides logistical and resource support as requested but no primary resource provider function.

ESF 8 – Public Health and Medical Services

HHS

OES-IHB, CA, PM, USAID, IO, DS, EB, Regional Bureaus, A, HR, OES-IHB, MED, and L

Role: coordinates with USG agencies, World Health Organization (WHO), and foreign governments on surveillance; containment countermeasures; vaccine and treatment resource sharing; deliver agreements; and actions to curb the spread of disease; as well as expediting visas for foreign experts and assisting American citizens stranded aboard.

ESF 9 – Search and Rescue

FEMA

USAID/OFDA, PM, EUR, CA, DS, IO, L, and Regional Bureaus

Role: coordinates requests for/entry of foreign SAR assets (persons and equipment) under the International Assistance System (IAS).

ESF 10 – Oil and Hazardous Materials Response

EPA

WHA, Other Regional Bureaus, IO, OES, EB, PM, DS, and L

Role: assists in coordinating development of oil and HAZMAT contingency plans/agreements, and information exchange between USG agencies and foreign governments and international organizations for oil and HAZMAT responses; coordinates assistance to cross-border communities and foreign assistance to the U.S.; facilitates entry of U.S. oil and HAZMAT personnel into other countries and notifies foreign governments of travel, transport restrictions/closures.

ESF 11 – Agriculture and Natural Resources

USDA

EB, OES, PM, Regional Bureaus, and IO

Role:  same as for ESF 8 as it applies to pandemics for plants and livestock, and anticipating foreign embargoes of U.S. agricultural products.

ESF 12 – Energy

DOE

EB, IO, Regional Bureaus

Role:  works with governments of major oil-consuming countries (and others) to maintain readiness to deploy a coordinated policy response to energy emergencies, initiates contacts with important energy producers, and coordinates with other agencies issuance of public statements.

ESF 13 – Public Safety and Security

DOJ

DS and A

Role:  provide public safety and security support, as requested.

ESF 14 – Long-Term Community recovery and Mitigation

FEMA

EB, IO, Regional Bureaus, and DS

Role:  facilitates international support for mitigation and recovery efforts.

ESF 15 – External Affairs

DHS

PA, IIP, CA, DS, and Regional Bureaus

Role:  coordinates consistent, timely, and effective USG message to foreign governments and public; manages information to American citizens and U.S. business abroad; and manages welfare, whereabouts, and evacuation inquiries from foreign governments.

6 FAM 415.4  Emergency Relocation Group (ERG)

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

The ERG is an integral part of the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program.  The team provides for the orderly deployment of pre-identified personnel, who will perform the mission essential functions at an emergency relocation site.  The program can only be activated by the President or the Secretary, and is managed by the Diplomatic Continuity Program Division (A/OEM/DCP).  The team is comprised of 250 individuals from the Department.  Each team member is notified via the Centralized Emergency Notification System (CENS) if the team is to be deployed and told when and where to report.  Should the activation occur after-hours, each member is contacted via CENS and provided with instructions on where to report.

6 FAM 415.4-1  ERG Members

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

ERG members are selected based on their skills and the position they hold.  Each member is informed of their membership on the team by his or her Executive Director.  Responsibilities of ERG members include:

(1)  Maintaining a go-kit with clothing and personal items for at least three days;

(2)  Attending the required training and orientation briefing once a year;

(3)  Keeping their contact information up-to-date at all times in CENS;

(4)  Having access to their vital records; and

(5)  If there is a family and/or personal situation that would keep a ERG member from participation on the team, notifying the appropriate Executive Director.

6 FAM 416  BUREAU AND OFFICE LEVEL RESPONSIBILITIES

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

6 FAM 416.1  Assistant Secretary

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

The responsibilities of each Assistant Secretary, or equivalent, in the Domestic Emergency Management Program include:

(1)  Ensuring bureau personnel with specific skills that may be of use in an emergency are identified;

(2)  Ensuring FEAPs for domestic facilities occupied by bureau/office personnel and BEAPs for bureau/office essential functions are developed, certified, maintained, and exercised;

(3)  Ensuring bureau/office representatives located in a domestic facility coordinate with co-located bureaus/offices to appoint the appropriate number of personnel as emergency response staff for the facility;

(4)  Reviewing, updating, and certifying its BEAP on an annual basis and providing A/OEM a copy of the certification page from the BEAP;

(5)  Overseeing the activation of the BEAP in the bureau/office or as part of the overall activation of the Department COOP Plan;

(6)  Ensuring the necessary number of bureau/office personnel are designated in writing as Emergency Relocation Group (ERG) or BEAT members (i.e., primaries and alternates as directed), and that:

(a)  They are not members of both teams at the same time to avoid mission conflict between the teams;

(b)  They have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to support, as required, continuation of the Department’s PMEFs or continuation of the Bureau’s MEFs;

(c)  They are capable of performing the specific responsibilities of their assigned position in the event of an emergency affecting Department and/or bureau continuity;

(d)  They are telework capable; and

(e)  They are Department personnel.  But if they are contractors or employees of contractors, they are designated BEAT members only if authorized by their contract.  (Note:  Contract wording approved by A/LM/AQM for contractors who wish to volunteer to be a member of the ERG or BEAT is available from A/OEM/PPD.)

(7)  Ensuring the ERG roster in the CENS is reviewed and updated monthly, and provided to A/OEM/DCP on request; and ensuring the BEAT roster is reviewed and updated in the BEAP and CENS on a quarterly basis;

(8)  Participating in the appropriate team (i.e., ERG or BEAT) orientation training and exercises to gain a full understanding of individual team responsibilities during an emergency;

(9)  Establishing an emergency action committee (EAC) for the bureau/office and appointing an appropriate group of subject-matter experts (SMEs) to be EAC members, with one SME leading the committee.  The EAC provides the guidance, with senior bureau/office leadership approval, necessary to prepare for and respond to emergencies, ensuring bureau/office MEFs and Department PMEFs continue through any emergency;

(10) Appointing an EAC Chairperson (See 6 FAM 415.4.); and

(11) For those Assistant Secretaries, or equivalents, with membership on the DEAC, providing the necessary support to the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program, through A/OEM (review the 6 FAM 415.2, 416, and 417 for further details on responsibilities).  Responsibilities for all Assistant Secretaries, or equivalents, include ensuring their bureau/office:

(a)  Assist and enable the Department, through A/OEM, to meet its emergency management responsibilities with regards to National Preparedness, Emergency Management, and Continuity Policy programs;

(b)  Coordinate, through A/OEM, achievement of an integrated Domestic Emergency Management Program within the Department; and

(c)  Designate sufficient numbers of bureau/office personnel in their domestic facilities to the emergency response staff, when insufficient personnel volunteer.

6 FAM 416.1-1  Executive Director

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the Executive Director include:

(1)  Supporting the EAC, as well as FEAP and BEAP implementation;

(2)  Developing a roster of bureau personnel’s specific skills that may be of use in an emergency;

(3)  Ensuring that senior leadership at each facility, where bureau/office personnel are tenants, works with the facility’s Designated Official (DO) to ensure that a copy of the most recent FEAP is available to all bureau/office personnel; that they are made aware of the FEAP’s contents; and that a copy of their FEAP is sent to A/OEM by the DO;

(4)  Ensuring that the highest-ranking bureau/office official at a domestic facility represents the bureau/office on the facility’s Facility Security Committee (FSC), whose membership includes representatives from co-located bureaus, offices, outside organizations that are tenants in the facility, as well as representatives from building management and security; (See 6 FAM 417.3)

(5)  Ensuring the BEAT roster is reviewed and updated in the BEAP on a quarterly basis; 

(6)  Activating, when necessary, the bureau notification tree using CENS;

(7)  Conducting quarterly alert and notification tests using CENS;

(8)  Ensuring Department personnel contact information is current in CENS;

(9)  Maintaining a backup phone tree system and current Department personnel contact information in the event CENS is unavailable;

(10) Ensuring the BEAP is posted on the bureau Web site and all bureau personnel are aware of the plan and its related procedures;

(11) Ensuring Personally Identifiable Information (PII) contained in the BEAP is protected in accordance with the Privacy Act and Department policy; 

(12) Ensuring there is a link to the A/OEM SharePoint sites for FEAPs and BEAPs from the bureau/office Web site (i.e., OpenNet and ClassNet) available to bureau/office personnel; and

(13) Ensuring the BEAP is sent to A/OEM.

6 FAM 416.1-2  Office Directors

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the Office Directors include:

(1)  Supporting the EAC, as well as FEAP and BEAP implementation;

(2)  Ensuring office representation on the EAC, as requested;

(3)  Ensuring office personnel review their FEAP and the BEAP; and understand their roles and responsibilities in each;

(4)  Ensuring contact information of office personnel is updated regularly; and

(5)  Ensuring emergency contact notification procedures are tested quarterly.

6 FAM 416.1-3  Emergency Action Committee (EAC) Chairperson

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the EAC Chairperson in the Domestic Emergency Management Program include:

(1)  Coordinating with EAC members and A/OEM to ensure their BEAP is developed, certified, maintained, and exercised;

(2)  Ensuring the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program is implemented within the bureau/office;

(3)  Ensuring an emergency’s impact on bureau/office operations is assessed;

(4)  Ensuring Department personnel and visitors at an impacted domestic location are accounted for and reports are made to the EMC;

(5)  Coordinating with the DEC to ensure the bureau/office provides representation on the IMT at the EMC upon request; and

(6)  Ensuring the appropriate EAP is activated in cases where infrastructure is affected, and during the recovery stage.

6 FAM 416.1-3(A)  Bureau’s Emergency Action Committee (EAC)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The bureau/office EAC is a group of subject-matter experts from the bureau/office, appointed by the principal officer.  It provides senior leadership with guidance in implementing the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program to prepare for and respond to threats and emergencies impacting the bureau/office.  The responsibilities of the EAC include:

(1)  Coordinating with the EAC Chairperson to develop and implement each phase of the BEAP;

(2)  Assisting with review and update of the BEAP as required; and

(3)  Coordinating with the EAC Chairperson to ensure the BEAP is exercised and certified on an annual basis.

6 FAM 416.1-4  Bureau Emergency Action Team (BEAT)

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

The BEAT is an integral part of the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program in two ways:  it supports the ERG in the event of a catastrophic emergency, and it performs the bureau essential functions (EFs) if normal working conditions and operations are compromised.  The BEAT may be required to remain at work, telework, or report to a relocation site to perform bureau EFs.  In the event of an emergency, the Assistant Secretary of a bureau may activate the team.  Deployment procedures vary, depending on the nature of the emergency.  Information about the BEAT is contained in the Bureau’s BEAP.

6 FAM 416.1-4(A)  BEAT Members

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

BEAT members are selected based on their skills and the position they hold.  Each member is informed of their membership on the team by his or her Executive Director.  Responsibilities of BEAT members include:

(1)  Maintaining a go-kit with clothing and personal items for at least three days;

(2)  Keeping their contact information up-to-date at all times;

(3)  Having access to their vital records; and

(4)  If there is a family and/or personal situation that would keep a member from participation on the team, notifying his/her Executive Director.

6 FAM 416.1-5  Other Bureau Personnel

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the bureau personnel not assigned a specific role in emergency management or response include:

(1)  Being familiar with their FEAP and the BEAP; and knowing their individual role and responsibilities, as appropriate, in the event of FEAP or BEAP activation;

(2)  Being prepared to augment BEAT members by deploying and/or supporting bureau essential functions in the event of BEAP activation;

(3)  Providing current home and cellular telephone numbers and personal email address to supervisors.

(4)  Authorizing supervisors to contact them as necessary (e.g., during emergencies); and

(5)  Participating in training and exercises (e.g., phone notification drills) as directed.

6 FAM 416.2  Bureau of Administration (A)

(CT:GS-202;   03-15-2018)

The Assistant Secretary for Administration (A) oversees A/OEM and ensures the Department is prepared to respond to and recover from any domestic emergency.  (See also 1 FAM 210.)  Additional A responsibilities include:

(1)  Serving as the Executive Secretary of the DEAC;

(2)  Serving as the Department’s Continuity Coordinator as directed by Presidential Policy Directive 40, National Continuity Policy (PPD-40);

(3)  Ensuring the effectiveness and survivability of the Department’s continuity capability;

(4)  Overseeing the Department’s preparedness to respond to and recover from any domestic emergency;

(5)  Overseeing the Department’s roles and responsibilities in supporting domestic incidents as required in the NRF;

(6)  Serving on Executive Office of the Interagency Policy Committees (IPCs) when directed; and

(7)  Attending DEAC meetings and ensuring there is appropriate A representation at DEAC Working Group meetings.

6 FAM 416.2-1  Office of Operations (A/OPR)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of A/OPR include:

(1)  Coordinating with A/OEM and the IMT on matters of domestic emergency management.

(2)  Providing A/OPR personnel for:

(a)  The IMT upon activation;

(b)  Disaster recovery of affected areas and temporary housing efforts to provide functional space to Department personnel; and

(c)  Supporting recovery and restoration of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms and the fine and decorative arts collection (in coordination with M/FA).

(3)  Participating in the DEAC working groups for implementation of all aspects of domestic emergency planning.

(4)  Serving as the Deputy DASHO.

6 FAM 416.2-2  Office of Facilities Management Services (A/OPR/FMS)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of A/OPR/FMS include:

(1)  Coordinating with A/OEM and the IMT on matters of domestic emergency management;

(2)  Providing appropriate A/OPR/FMS personnel for the IMT upon activation (e.g., FMS senior representatives for staffing the IMT and DESD personnel to perform the Safety Officer role on the IMT, the onsite Incident Command Staff, or the Unified Command, as appropriate);

(3)  Participating in the DEAC working groups for implementation of all aspects of domestic emergency planning;

(4)  Providing A/OEM with technical information and identification of risks that can assist in prioritization of mitigation, planning, and recovery strategies;

(5)  Conveying facility information (e.g., facility, safety, and industrial hygiene data) to external resources that may be involved in a response (e.g., fire, police, public health) - in coordination with A/OEM;

(6)  Being familiar with relevant parts of the appropriate FEAP.  (See 6 FAH-2 and FEAP Template); and

(7)  Performing the following when an emergency occurs, as appropriate (generally for assigned facilities only):

(a)  Initiating evacuation, if needed;

(b)  Assessing damage to facilities (in coordination with A/OPR/RPM); and

(c)  Initiating repair, recovery, and restoration (in coordination with A/OPR/RPM).

6 FAM 416.2-3  Office of Real Property Management (A/OPR/RPM)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of A/OPR/RPM include:

(1)  Obtaining alternate facilities as needed to support Department operations;

(2)  Assessing damage to facilities (in coordination with A/OPR/FMS); and

(3)  Initiating repair, recovery, and restoration (in coordination with A/OPR/FMS).

6 FAM 416.2-4  Office of Logistics Management (A/LM)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of A/LM include providing logistics support for response and recovery operations (e.g., food, shelter, and lavatories).

6 FAM 416.2-5  Office of Global Information Services (A/GIS)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of A/GIS include:

(1)  Appointing a Vital Records Officer that is responsible for overseeing the development and implementation of the Department’s Vital Records Program.  (See the term “Vital Records”.)

(2)  Working with A/OEM to annually review the vital Records Program to address problem areas, update information, and identify any additional vital record requirement that may result from new Department programs or functions.

(3)  Appointing a Vital Records Coordinator, who is responsible for:

(a)  Ensuring identification of Department vital records and databases and establishment of protective procedures;

(b)  Developing a training program for all bureau/office Records Coordinators and other personnel assigned responsibilities in the Department’s Vital Records Program to ensure:

(i)     Proper identification and inventory of Department vital records

(ii)    Copies of all records selected for retention at the offsite storage location are collected and sent to the alternate facility for storage

(4)  Conducting reviews and tests of the Vital Records Program during COOP/BEAP drills/exercises in coordination with A/OEM;

(5)  Coordinating periodic updating of vital records listings in coordination with each bureau/office Records Coordinator;

(6)  Providing periodic vital record information updates to A/OEM;

(7)  Determining the cycle for removal of obsolete copies of records and replacement with copies of current vital records; and

(8)  Identifying records recovery experts and vendors to assist with records recovery in the event of records damage.

6 FAM 416.3  Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of DS include:

(1)  Coordinating with A/OEM and the IMT on matters of domestic emergency management;

(2)  Providing DS management personnel (e.g., DS/DO/DFP representatives for law enforcement issues) for the IMT upon activation;

(3)  Having jurisdiction and oversight authority for all law enforcement/security responsibilities pursuant to the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986, as amended (22 U.S.C. 4802 et seq.) as it pertains to Emergency Management activities.  This includes:

(a)  Managing the Department’s protective security support programs, which include the Domestic Security Officer Program (under the Office of Domestic Facilities Protection (DS/DO/DFP);

(b)  Ensuring the Uniform Protection Branch (UPB) force is fully trained in its duties during emergencies, as prescribed by the specific FEAP or BEAP;

(c)  Ensuring domestic SCC procedures include contacting the EMC per established tripwires, and with periodic updates, to provide reports on any domestic emergency impacting the Department; and

(d)  Securing Department facilities during an emergency by:

(i)     Deploying security, as appropriate; and

(ii)    Initiating and coordinating evacuation, if warranted.

(4)  Attending DEAC meetings and ensuring there is appropriate DS representation at DEAC Working Group meetings; and

(5)  Supporting the DEAC to ensure that domestic requirements of National Preparedness, Emergency Management, and Continuity Policy programs are implemented throughout the Department.

6 FAM 416.4  Comptroller and Global Financial Services - Chief Financial Officer (CGFS-CFO)

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

The responsibilities of CGFS-CFO include:

(1)  Providing financial data to M regarding costs for domestic emergencies as directed;

(2)  Providing approved funding to support internal Department response and recovery from impacts of domestic emergencies;

(3)  Providing reimbursement funding for approved Federal-to-Federal mutual aid under the NRF;

(4)  Providing CGFS personnel to the EMC upon request to provide assistance and consultation during domestic emergencies;

(5)  Attending DEAC meetings and ensuring there is appropriate CGFS representation at DEAC Working Group meetings; and

(6)  Supporting the DEAC to ensure that domestic requirements of National Preparedness, Emergency Management, and Continuity Policy programs are implemented throughout the Department.

6 FAM 416.5  Bureau of Public Affairs (PA)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of PA include:

(1)  Gathering details from A/OEM, the EMC, the IMT, and the Operations Center for use with media inquiries and for assisting in the preparation of proactive, coordinated messages to be delivered by the onsite Incident Command Staff or the UC to media at the incident site;

(2)  Coordinating media relations between bureaus/offices and the public when dealing with domestic emergencies that impact the Department, a facility occupied by Department personnel, or the surrounding community;

(3)  Providing PA personnel to the EMC upon request to provide technical assistance and consultation regarding the public and media during domestic emergencies; and

(4)  Updating the media and the public regarding the emergency, as needed.

6 FAM 416.6  Bureau of Information Resource Management (IRM)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of IRM include:

(1)  Supporting A/OEM’s IT and communications requirements and equipment (e.g., radio program and notification systems) during an emergency;

(2)  Providing IRM personnel to the EMC upon request to provide technical assistance and consultation during domestic emergencies; and

(3)  Coordinating with A/GIS, bureaus, and offices to protect and support vital systems and databases identified as vital records.

6 FAM 416.7  Medical Director (MED)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of MED include:

(1)  Serving as the DASHO (see 16 FAM 600); and

(2)  Providing MED personnel to the EMC upon request to provide technical assistance and consultation during domestic emergencies.

6 FAM 416.8  Human Resources (HR)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of HR include:

(1)  Coordinating with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) regarding the Department’s operating status;

(2)  Coordinating the requirements of the Special Needs Program to assist people with disabilities and special needs; and

(3)  Providing HR personnel to the EMC upon request to provide technical assistance and consultation during domestic emergencies.

6 FAM 416.9  Foreign Service Institute (FSI)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of FSI include:

(1)  Coordinating with A/OEM to:

(a)  Assist A/OEM with initiating new emergency management-related courses, as needed; and

(c)  Ensure homeland security training is available (e.g., the National Security Professional Development program).

(2)  Providing FSI personnel to the EMC upon request to provide technical assistance and consultation during domestic emergencies.

6 FAM 416.10  Executive Secretary (S/ES)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

S/ES is the conduit for information and policy directives flowing to and from the Department's principals and the bureaus, offices, overseas posts, and other departments and agencies.  When a domestic emergency occurs that impacts the Department, S/ES works through the Operations Center to ensure the flow of information to the Department's principals and the bureaus and offices.  S/ES activates the Alternate Operations Center (AOC), if warranted.

6 FAM 416.11  Legal Adviser (L)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The responsibilities of the Legal Adviser include providing direct legal support to the Department’s various bureaus and offices during domestic emergencies.  The Office of Management (L/M) reviews and approves all orders of succession and delegations of authority in the Department’s COOP Plan and in individual BEAPs.

6 FAM 416.12  Bureau and Offices with Leadership Roles in Domestic Incidents

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The following bureaus and offices have assigned responsibility as “Lead Bureau/Office,” under the Concept of Operations for Domestic Crisis Response, for the domestic incidents specified in 6 FAM 415.3-3d.:

(1)  Bureau of Administration (A);

(2)  Bureau of Counterterrorism (CT);

(3)  Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS);

(4)  Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR);

(5)  Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN); and

(6)  Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES).

6 FAM 417  FACILITY LEVEL RESPONSIBILITIES

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

6 FAM 417.1  Bureau/Office Facility Leadership

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

At each domestic facility, the responsibilities of bureau and office leadership as members of the FSC for the facility in which they work, include:

(1)  Conveying bureau/office operating status and emergency actions to bureau/office personnel during duty and non-duty hours;

(2)  Accounting for bureau/office personnel and visitors after an emergency and reporting that information to the FSC and as required for incident response;

(3)  Ensuring the bureau/office is represented on the FSC, as required;

(4)  Ensuring bureau/office personnel support the facility’s DO and the FSC in implementing emergency management and response actions;

(5)  Ensuring the FEAP for their facility is developed, implemented, certified, maintained, and exercised;

(6)  When insufficient personnel volunteer, appointing the appropriate number of personnel as emergency response staff for the facility.  Personnel selected to the emergency response staff must:

(a)  Be capable of performing the specific responsibilities of their assigned position in the event evacuation or shelter-in-place (and, as directed, an internal relocation) is necessary, as outlined in the facility’s FEAP or as presented during emergency training;

(b)  Be Department personnel.  But if they are contractors or employees of contractors, they are designated emergency response staff members only if authorized by their contract.  Contract wording approved by A/LM/AQM for contractors who wish to volunteer to as emergency response staff is available from A/OEM/PPD;

(c)  Perform the duties prescribed in the appropriate FEAP in conjunction with their regular duties; and

(d)  Participate in the appropriate training, including the completion of FSI’s online “Floor Warden and Monitor” training course (PD 541) on an annual basis.  Also, attend the orientation program to understand that they have an individual responsibility to exercise vigilance and care in complying with their emergency response staff responsibilities during emergencies.

(7)  Ensuring bureau/office personnel and visitors understand and follow the actions outlined in the FEAP during an emergency;

(8)  Identifying the emergency’s impact on their operations and providing this information to the EMC, the IMT, and/or Task Force, when requested; and

(9)  Ensuring the EMC is contacted as soon as possible, following-up by periodic situation reports (SITREPs), to provide information on the domestic emergency impacting their facility (e.g., Department personnel or facility status).

6 FAM 417.2  Designated Official (DO)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

Per GSA directives for Federal Government owned or leased facilities, the DO is the highest ranking official from the largest bureau or office in a facility where the Department is the single Federal tenant; or, is the highest ranking official from the largest Federal department or agency in a facility where there are multi-Federal tenants.  In either case, if the Department is responsible for furnishing the DO, he or she could come from a bureau or office.  While the highest ranking official is normally selected as the DO, facility tenant organizations may select, by mutual agreement, someone other than that person to be the DO.  But in most cases, the DO must work fulltime in the facility for which he/she is the DO.  The responsibilities of the DO include:

(1)  Developing and maintaining the facility’s emergency preparedness program, which includes the FEAP, and chairing the FSC; and

(2)  Ensuring procedures in the FEAP include providing situation reports (SITREPs) to the EMC regarding any domestic emergency that impacts his or her facility (e.g., Department personnel or facility status).

6 FAM 417.3  Facility Security Committee (FSC)

(CT:GS-169;   06-01-2012)

An FSC is required in all Federal facilities by the Interagency Security Committee (ISC) standard—“Facility Security Level Determinations for Federal Facilities.”  An FSC is a committee consisting of representatives of all Federal tenants in the facility, generally responsible for identifying building-specific security issues and approving the implementation of security measures and practices, as coordinated with appropriate security organizations (e.g., DS and Federal Protective Service (FPS)).  The responsibilities of the FSC include:

(1)  For the purposes of a FEAP, approving the implementation of emergency management measures and practices based on the current risk assessments developed from the analysis of the current threat and vulnerability assessments;

(2)  Coordinating with DS on security matters in the FSC role as the officials responsible for developing, implementing, certifying, and maintaining the FEAP.  DS must approve any change in a security measure, policy, or practice before it can be implemented;

(3)  Coordinating with all government and civilian organizations in the facility to, if possible, create a single FEAP for the entire building, not a different plan for each organization.  Other organizations (i.e., non-Federal organizations, etc.) in the facility should be offered the opportunity to be members.  However, each tenant organization in the facility needs to have some input into what to do during an emergency (e.g., fire, severe weather, intruder, bomb threat, etc.); and

(4)  Coordinating with the DO; the owner, commercial manager, or leasing department or agency; DS; and the security organization(s) responsible for the facility (e.g., DS, FPS) to determine the facility’s security level (FSL).

6 FAM 417.4  Domestic Security Officer (DSO)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

A Domestic Security Officer (DSO) is assigned by DS to most domestic facilities in the National Capital Region (NCR) that are under the protection of DS.  The DSO exercises oversight and management of the DS Uniformed Protective Officers (UPOs) and coordinates all physical security matters at the assigned facility.  The DSO coordinates security activities with the FSC for multi-tenant facilities within the NCR.  For those facilities outside the NCR where access is controlled by DS UPOs, there is a DSO assigned to coordinate activities from Washington, DC, and to make periodic visits.

6 FAM 417.5  Facility Emergency Response Team (ERT)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

6 FAM 417.5-1  Incident Commander (IC)

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The IC is the person designated by the FSC, or as provided in 6 FAM 423.6-1, to be responsible for coordinating all activities of the emergency response staff in the facility.  The IC remains in charge of the emergency response staff until such time command is transferred to another fully qualified IC, UC or he or she is relieved by proper authority (e.g., local fire or police department representative).  When a UC is established, the Department’s IC coordinates resource assets with the EMC, especially regarding logistics and public affairs.

6 FAM 417.5-2  Emergency Response Staff

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The emergency response staff, made up of occupants of the facility, is responsible for ensuring occupants evacuate their office spaces, quickly and safely, to the appropriate assembly point.  Each emergency response staff member is also responsible for ensuring local emergency responders are made aware of the location of trapped or incapable occupants, as well as areas not searched.  There is emergency response staff assigned to each floor of the facility.

6 FAM 418  PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

6 FAM 418.1  Domestic Emergency Management Program Administration

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

Under DEAC direction, A/OEM administers the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program, except for all law enforcement/security responsibilities as delineated in 6 FAM 416.3 paragraph (3), and includes:

(1)  Providing overall policy coordination in the formulation and execution of domestic mission assurance efforts, which include COG, COOP, enduring constitutional government (ECG), CIP, Business Continuity Planning (BCP), Disaster Preparedness Planning (DPP), Information Technology Disaster Recovery Planning (ITDRP), and other national security emergency preparedness activities, to ensure the Department is able to conduct its PMEFs.  This also includes assisting and coordinating with Department personnel to meet the requirements of National Preparedness programs, embodied in Presidential, national, and Department of State directives;

(2)  Maintaining and operating the EMC to coordinate emergency response using the NIMS;

(3)  Overseeing the emergency preparedness exercise program to ensure the Department and respective bureaus/offices are prepared to operate in domestic emergency situations;

(4)  Providing drill and exercise results, including participation levels, in an After Action Report (AAR) to the DEAC;

(5)  Ensuring the Department accomplishes its internal domestic preparedness responsibilities for CIP emanating from HSPD-7 and the NIPP.  This is accomplished by:

(a)  Identifying, prioritizing, and protecting the Department’s CIKR that support its MEFs and PMEFs;

(b)  Maintaining a viable CIP Plan for the Department; and

(c)  Coordinating response to domestic tasks emanating from the NIPP.

(6)  Receiving and coordinating all inquiries and tasks concerning domestic emergency management and continuity from the National Security Council Staff (NSS), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), or other departments and agencies;

(7)  Providing domestic emergency management, coordination, and support to interagency committees, working groups, and task forces when designated;

(8)  Coordinating and managing, from the EMC or at alternate EMC sites, domestic continuity and emergency management program support capabilities;

(9)  Maintaining the A/OEM ePrepare Web site to provide important resource information on emergency preparedness and situational updates, during emergency operations;

(10) Providing guidance and assistance to IMT members regarding training, exercises, preparation, and operations within domestic emergency activities;

(11) Submitting an annual status report of the Department’s domestic emergency management and continuity program capabilities to the DEAC Chairperson via the designated DEAC Working Group;

(12) Coordinating development of plans for performing PMEFs to meet the Department’s foreign policy objectives and to comply with existing Federal statutes or international agreements; 

(13) Ensuring the continuity of the Department’s PMEFs during a wide range of emergencies, including localized natural phenomena, accidents, technological incidents, or attack-related emergencies;

(14) Coordinating with each bureau and office to develop a list of MEFs to support continuance of the Department’s PMEFs;

(15) Ensuring Department personnel, who have a role in performing PMEFs participate in the exercises conducted to validate PMEFs;

(16) Ensuring that appropriate Department personnel are involved in validating the FEAP for the facility in which they are located and that each bureau/office develops, maintains, and validates its BEAP (which includes performing MEFs under exercise conditions);

(17) Identifying CIKR to ensure that it is protected and is a primary focus of attention during any emergency that impacts the Department per the NIPP;

(18) Working with the Department’s Vital Records Officer to annually review the Vital Records Program to address problem areas, update information, and identify any additional vital records requirement that may result from new Department programs or functions;

(19) Promulgating policies and procedures for Department-wide emergency response through the Mission Assurance effort.  A/OEM ensures a desired state of emergency preparedness is maintained by making recommendations to the DEAC, the Operations Center, and others in the Department in the development, implementation, and coordination of the Department’s domestic emergency response;

(20) Ensuring Department personnel, who are eligible to receive training, in coordination with FSI, are provided training in emergency procedures to know what to do before, during, and after a major domestic emergency if performing either in an emergency management or contingency position, or as a facility occupant;

(21) Overseeing the efforts of DOs, who are responsible for developing a facility occupant training program in emergency management and response;

(22) Coordinating development and overall maintenance of the DEAP with appropriate Department elements to ensure that integrated domestic emergency preparedness is achieved;

(23) Providing bureaus and offices guidance and oversight in development and approval of:

(a)  FEAPs, following guidance in 6 FAH-2 (FEAP) and the FEAP Template; and

(b)  BEAPs, following guidance in the BEAP Template.

(24) Making all emergency action plans (EAPs), whether at the Department, bureau, office, or facility level, available through the A/OEM Web site on OpenNet and on ClassNet, where access to Privacy Act data is protected.  All bureaus and offices must:

(a)  Link all references to their FEAPs to the A/OEM Web site, whether on OpenNet or on ClassNet.  The A/OEM Web site is the only location for electronically accessing domestic FEAPs; and

(b)  Ensure the A/OEM ePrepare Web site (on OpenNet and ClassNet) is linked directly to each bureau/office Web site and their BEAPs.

(25) Facilitating incident management of all domestic emergencies that impact any Department domestic facility, including first responders, from its EMC in HST using the NIMS.  In such emergencies, except for all Law Enforcement/Security responsibilities as delineated in 6 FAM 416.3 paragraph (3), A/OEM facilitates:

(a)  Management of domestic emergencies by coordinating with senior Department officials and the Department’s Operations Center.  In most localized events, emergency management partners (i.e., A/OEM, A/OPR, A/OPR/FMS, and DS) ensure sufficient personnel are available to respond to the EMC to coordinate a plan of action.  This includes support to A/OEM/DCP to carry out its responsibilities for the ERG and its activation, including working with bureaus and offices with regards to the ERG;

(b)  Initial actions of all first responders, whether Department-affiliated or from local, State, or other Federal departments and agencies, who react to the emergency; and

(c)  Relay of information pertaining to ongoing domestic emergencies, except for law enforcement sensitive information, to:

(i)     Appropriate parties within the Department, including the Department’s Operations Center and Public Affairs personnel; and

(ii)    Local, State, tribal, or other Federal departments and agencies.

6 FAM 418.2  Requirement to Communicate with Department Personnel

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

The Department of State must be able to communicate with its personnel in the event of an emergency, natural disaster, or other event affecting Department operations.  However, contractors and employees of contractors are covered only by 6 FAM 418.2-4, not the remainder of 6 FAM 418.2.

6 FAM 418.2-1  Bureau Authority

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. Bureaus have the authority to collect, maintain, and use, when necessary, personal contact information (i.e., the home and cell telephone phone numbers and email addresses) of personnel for emergency notification and other official purposes, as provided in 6 FAM 418.2-2.

b. Personnel that refuse to provide personal contact information could adversely affect the efficiency of Department operations, as it may interfere with the Department’s ability to contact personnel in the event of an emergency.  This will affect the Department’s ability to fulfill its mission.

c.  Department employees who refuse to provide personal contact information may be subject to disciplinary action under 3 FAM 4300, Disciplinary Action (Including Separation for Cause) (Foreign Service), or 3 FAM 4500, Civil Service Disciplinary Actions (Civil Service).

6 FAM 418.2-2  Use of Contact Information

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

a. Bureaus will maintain personnel contact information (e.g., home and cell telephone numbers and email addresses) as part of their vital records, which may be used by the Department to communicate with personnel in the event of an emergency or other event affecting Department operations.  The Bureau will share information regarding the contact information with the S/ES Operations Center, the EMC, and the DS Coordination Center.

b. Authorized Department of State personnel may use the information on an occasional basis to contact personnel who are out of the office, or after regular duty hours, to obtain or pass on information necessary for official business (although personnel may not be required to respond unless officially recalled to duty), or to contact friends or family members if personnel experience a personal emergency.

c.  The information provided by personnel may also be released to Federal, State, or local departments and agencies for law enforcement, counter-terrorism, and homeland security purposes, and may be used for other authorized purposes under the Privacy Act.

6 FAM 418.2-3  Handling Contact Information

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

Personal contact information (e.g., home and cell telephone numbers and email addresses) of Department personnel is considered sensitive personal information.  As such, they may be protected by the Privacy Act of 1974.  Accordingly, the Department requires that personal contact information be treated, protected, and handled as Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU) information.  For further details, see 5 FAM 460, Privacy Act Requirements, and 12 FAM 540, Sensitive But Unclassified Information (SBU).

6 FAM 418.2-4  Contractors and Employees of Contractors

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

Contractors and employees of contractors are not covered by 6 FAM 418.2 provisions cited above.  If the Department requires contractors and employees of contractors to provide their personal contact information (e.g., home and cell telephone numbers and email addresses), that requirement must be authorized in their contracts.  In addition, the Privacy Act requires that a Privacy Act clause be included in their contracts.

6 FAM 418.3  Preparedness Training and Exercises

(CT:GS-195;   07-12-2017)

6 FAM 418.3-1  Preparedness Training

(CT:GS-195;   07-12-2017)

a. Training, a key part of the Department’s Domestic Emergency Management Program, is a requirement to ensure a viable program exists within the Department.  It is consistent with FSI policies and is accomplished through the efforts of A/OEM and the leadership of the other bureaus and offices, as well as the participation of all Department personnel who are eligible to receive training.  Each group’s role in training is outlined below.

b. A/OEM oversees the development and implementation of the emergency preparedness training program throughout the Department.  A/OEM is responsible for the following:

(1)  Providing technical assistance (as requested) to bureaus and offices in the development and conduct of bureau-level training and exercises;

(2)  Providing training material for emergency response staff and assembly point coordinators for each bureau/office;

(3)  Providing technical assistance to HR/OAA/DRAD (as requested) with the conduct of the Special Needs Program;

(4)  Conducting Department-level preparedness activities (e.g. “R U Ready” Speaker Series and Town Hall Meetings);

(5)  When requested, providing introductory emergency preparedness presentations as part of orientation courses conducted by FSI; and

(6)  Developing on-line emergency preparedness training in coordination with FSI.

c.  Bureaus and offices implement the emergency preparedness training program at the bureau/office and facility level.  Bureaus and offices are responsible for the following:

(1)  Coordinating with the DO and, as appropriate, the building manager, the owner, commercial manager, and/or the leasing department or agency, in conducting training on the FEAP;

(2)  Conducting bureau/office level training on the BEAP; and

(3)  Conducting bureau/office level training on personal preparedness and individual actions to take during an emergency.

d. The DO develops and maintains the facility’s emergency preparedness program.  DOs are responsible for the following:

(1)  Conducting quarterly group meeting of leaders from emergency response staff to discuss roles and responsibilities; and

(2)  Conducting semi-annual meeting between DO, all emergency response staff and, as appropriate, the building manager, the owner, commercial manager, and/or the leasing department or agency,  to discuss results of training, staffing, exercises (and real-world events), and lessons learned.

e. Department personnel participate in the emergency preparedness training program through the guidance of their bureau/office and facility leadership.  Department personnel, unless not eligible to receive training, are responsible for the following:

(1)  Participating in training on general emergency preparedness related topics (e.g., actions to take by individuals for their safety and for the safety of their fellow employees); and

(2)  Participating in specific emergency preparedness training (e.g., emergency roles and responsibility training).

6 FAM 418.3-2  Preparedness Exercises

(CT:GS-167;   05-17-2012)

Exercises ensure emergency plans can be effectively executed and also identify areas for improvement.  Exercises are accomplished through the efforts of A/OEM and the leadership of other bureaus and offices, as well as the participation of Department personnel.  Each group’s role in exercises is outlined below:

(1)  A/OEM oversees development and implementation of the emergency preparedness exercise program throughout the Department.  A/OEM is responsible for the following:

(a)  Scheduling Department-level exercises far enough in advance to ensure maximum participation;

(b)  Coordinating mandatory participation in Department-level exercises by necessary Department personnel;

(c)  Coordinating quarterly notification exercises to validate bureau and office notification procedures;

(d)  Cooperating with A/OPR/FMS (e.g., building manager) and, as appropriate, the owner, commercial manager, and/or the leasing department or agency, to provide guidance for conducting domestic facility-level drills and exercises; and

(e)  Providing technical assistance, when requested, to bureaus and offices conducting FEAP- or BEAP-level exercises.

(2)  Bureaus and offices develop and implement the emergency preparedness exercise program at the bureau and facility level.  Bureaus and offices are responsible for the following:

(a)  Requiring full participation in scheduled exercises by all bureau/office personnel;

(b)  Participating in development and conduct of FEAP-level exercises;

(c)  Developing and conducting BEAP-level exercises; and

(d)  Conducting quarterly notification exercises to validate notification procedures.

(3)  The DO develops and conducts exercises for the facility’s emergency preparedness program in coordination with, as appropriate, the building manager, the owner, commercial manager, and/or the leasing department or agency.

(4)  Department personnel participate in emergency exercises to ensure they are familiar with their role and responsibilities within bureau and facility emergency plans.

6 FAM 419  Department Personnel RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

(CT:GS-195;   07-12-2017)

6 FAM 419.1  Department Personnel Rights

(CT:GS-195;   07-12-2017)

As applicable, Department personnel rights include:

(1)  Having access to their facility’s FEAP, their bureau’s/office’s BEAP, and any other directives or guidance that involves their security and safety, which are available through the A/OEM Web site (on OpenNet and ClassNet):

(2)  Offering comments on their emergency plans through their bureau’s/office’s Executive Office: and

(3)  Requesting special needs assistance by filling out the Self Identification Form (DS-4126, Emergency Preparedness Employee Self-Identification) and forwarding it to HR/OAA/DRAD.

6 FAM 419.2  Department Personnel Responsibilities

(CT:GS-198;   11-17-2017)

Department personnel responsibilities include:

(1)  Complying with the requirements set forth in this FAM, unless otherwise noted:

(2)  Following the Department’s prescribed personal safety practices:

(3)  Providing home and cell telephone numbers to designated personnel for use by bureau/office leadership in emergency notification situations and other official purposes:

(4)  Advising supervisors of any unmet or special need required during domestic emergencies (e.g., assistance to safely evacuate a building or to shelter-in-place); and

(5)  Contacting the HR Work Life Program Office (HR/ER/WLD) if satisfactory action is not achieved after reporting an unmet need for reasonable accommodation to a supervisor and/or the bureau or office Executive Director.  (NOTE:  That office must investigate and ensure that appropriate actions are taken in consultation with A/OEM.)